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Probability Theory Paradoxes - Simpson's Paradox, Birthday Problem, Monty Hall Problem, St. Petersburg Paradox, Boy or Girl Paradox (Paperback) Loot Price: R270 Discovery Miles 2 700
Probability Theory Paradoxes - Simpson's Paradox, Birthday Problem, Monty Hall Problem, St. Petersburg Paradox, Boy or...
Probability Theory Paradoxes - Simpson's Paradox, Birthday Problem, Monty Hall Problem, St. Petersburg Paradox, Boy or...

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Probability Theory Paradoxes - Simpson's Paradox, Birthday Problem, Monty Hall Problem, St. Petersburg Paradox, Boy or Girl Paradox (Paperback)

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Loot Price R270 Discovery Miles 2 700

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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 41. Chapters: Simpson's paradox, Birthday problem, Monty Hall problem, St. Petersburg paradox, Boy or Girl paradox, Two envelopes problem, Bertrand's box paradox, Three Prisoners problem, Nontransitive dice, Bertrand paradox, Exchange paradox, Sleeping Beauty problem, Borel-Kolmogorov paradox, Berkson's paradox, Necktie paradox, Littlewood's law. Excerpt: The Monty Hall problem is a probability puzzle loosely based on the American television game show Let's Make a Deal and named after the show's original host, Monty Hall. The problem, also called the Monty Hall paradox, is a veridical paradox because the result appears odd but is demonstrably true. The Monty Hall problem, in its usual interpretation, is mathematically equivalent to the earlier Three Prisoners problem, and both bear some similarity to the much older Bertrand's box paradox. The problem was originally posed in a letter by Steve Selvin to the American Statistician in 1975. (Selvin 1975a) (Selvin 1975b) A well-known statement of the problem was published in Marilyn vos Savant's "Ask Marilyn" column in Parade magazine in 1990 (vos Savant 1990): Vos Savant's response was that the contestant should always switch to the other door. If the car is initially equally likely to be behind each door, a player who picks Door 1 and doesn't switch has a 1 in 3 chance of winning the car while a player who picks Door 1 and does switch has a 2 in 3 chance. Consequently, contestants who switch double their chances of winning the car. Many readers refused to believe that switching is beneficial. After the Monty Hall problem appeared in Parade, approximately 10,000 readers, including nearly 1,000 with PhDs, wrote to the magazine claiming that vos Savant was wrong. (Tierney 1991) Even when given explanations, simulations, and formal mathematical proofs, many people still do not accept tha...

General

Imprint: Books LLC, Wiki Series
Country of origin: United States
Release date: September 2011
First published: September 2011
Authors: Source Wikipedia
Creators: Books Llc
Dimensions: 246 x 189 x 2mm (L x W x T)
Format: Paperback - Trade
Pages: 42
ISBN-13: 978-1-155-25748-8
Barcode: 9781155257488
Categories: Books
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LSN: 1-155-25748-0

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