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Books > Social sciences > Politics & government > Political control & freedoms > Human rights > Civil rights & citizenship

Memoir of a Race Traitor - Fighting Racism in the American South (Paperback): Mab Segrest Memoir of a Race Traitor - Fighting Racism in the American South (Paperback)
Mab Segrest
R348 R283 Discovery Miles 2 830 Save R65 (19%) 14 working days
Place, Diversity and Solidarity (Hardcover): Stijn Oosterlynck, Nick Schuermans, Maarten Loopmans Place, Diversity and Solidarity (Hardcover)
Stijn Oosterlynck, Nick Schuermans, Maarten Loopmans
R1,804 Discovery Miles 18 040 Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

In many countries, particularly in the Global North, established forms of solidarity within communities are said to be challenged by the increasing ethnic and cultural diversity of the population. Against the backdrop of renewed geopolitical tensions - which inflate and exploit ethno-cultural, rather than political-economic cleavages - concerns are raised that ethnic and cultural diversity challenge both the formal mechanisms of redistribution and informal acts of charity, reciprocity and support which underpin common notions of community. This book focuses on the innovative forms of solidarity that develop around the joint appropriation and the envisaged common future of specific places. Drawing on examples from schools, streets, community centres, workplaces, churches, housing projects and sporting projects, it provides an alternative research agenda from the 'loss of community' narrative. It reflects on the different spatiotemporal frames in which solidarities are nurtured, the connections forged between solidarity and citizenship, and the role of interventions by professionals to nurture solidarity in diversity. This timely and original work will be essential reading for those working in human geography, sociology, ethnic studies, social work, urban studies, political studies and cultural studies.

Crimmigration in Australia - Law, Politics, and Society (Hardcover, 1st ed. 2019): Peter Billings Crimmigration in Australia - Law, Politics, and Society (Hardcover, 1st ed. 2019)
Peter Billings
R2,580 R2,305 Discovery Miles 23 050 Save R275 (11%) Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

This multidisciplinary book introduces readers to original perspectives on crimmigration that foster holistic, contextual, and critical appreciation of the concept in Australia and its individual consequences and broader effects. This collection draws together contributions from nationally and internationally respected legal scholars and social scientists united by common and overlapping interests, who identify, critique, and reimagine crimmigration law and practice in Australia, and thereby advance understanding of this important field of inquiry. Specifically, crimmigration is addressed and analysed from a variety of standpoints, including: criminal law/justice; administrative law/justice; immigration law; international law; sociology of law; legal history feminist theory, settler colonialism, and political sociology. The book aims to: explore the historical antecedents of contemporary crimmigration and continuities with the past in Australia reveal the forces driving crimmigration and explain its relationship to border securitisation in Australia identify and examine the different facets of crimmigration, comprising: the substantive overlaps between criminal and immigration law; crimmigration processes; investigative techniques, surveillance strategies, and law enforcement agents, institutions and practices uncover the impacts of crimmigration law and practice upon the human rights and interests of non-citizens and their families. analyse crimmigration from assorted critical standpoints; including settler colonialism, race and feminist perspectives By focusing upon these issues, the book provides an interconnected collection of chapters with a cohesive narrative, notwithstanding that contributors approach the themes and specific issues from different theoretical and critical standpoints, and employ a range of research methods.

The Good Immigrant - 26 Writers Reflect on America (Hardcover): Nikesh Shukla, Chim Ene Suleyman The Good Immigrant - 26 Writers Reflect on America (Hardcover)
Nikesh Shukla, Chim Ene Suleyman 1
R534 R419 Discovery Miles 4 190 Save R115 (22%) 14 working days
Cold War Civil Rights - Race and the Image of American Democracy (Paperback, Revised edition): Mary L. Dudziak Cold War Civil Rights - Race and the Image of American Democracy (Paperback, Revised edition)
Mary L. Dudziak
R607 R477 Discovery Miles 4 770 Save R130 (21%) Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

In 1958, an African-American handyman named Jimmy Wilson was sentenced to die in Alabama for stealing two dollars. Shocking as this sentence was, it was overturned only after intense international attention and the interference of an embarrassed John Foster Dulles. Soon after the United States' segregated military defeated a racist regime in World War II, American racism was a major concern of U.S. allies, a chief Soviet propaganda theme, and an obstacle to American Cold War goals throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Each lynching harmed foreign relations, and "the Negro problem" became a central issue in every administration from Truman to Johnson.

In what may be the best analysis of how international relations affected any domestic issue, Mary Dudziak interprets postwar civil rights as a Cold War feature. She argues that the Cold War helped facilitate key social reforms, including desegregation. Civil rights activists gained tremendous advantage as the government sought to polish its international image. But improving the nation's reputation did not always require real change. This focus on image rather than substance--combined with constraints on McCarthy-era political activism and the triumph of law-and-order rhetoric--limited the nature and extent of progress.

Archival information, much of it newly available, supports Dudziak's argument that civil rights was Cold War policy. But the story is also one of people: an African-American veteran of World War II lynched in Georgia; an attorney general flooded by civil rights petitions from abroad; the teenagers who desegregated Little Rock's Central High; African diplomats denied restaurant service; black artists living in Europe and supporting the civil rights movement from overseas; conservative politicians viewing desegregation as a communist plot; and civil rights leaders who saw their struggle eclipsed by Vietnam.

Never before has any scholar so directly connected civil rights and the Cold War. Contributing mightily to our understanding of both, Dudziak advances--in clear and lively prose--a new wave of scholarship that corrects isolationist tendencies in American history by applying an international perspective to domestic affairs.

In her new preface, Dudziak discusses the way the Cold War figures into civil rights history, and details this book's origins, as one question about civil rights could not be answered without broadening her research from domestic to international influences on American history.

Sisters in the Struggle - African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement (Paperback): Bettye Collier-Thomas,... Sisters in the Struggle - African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement (Paperback)
Bettye Collier-Thomas, V.P. Franklin
R634 Discovery Miles 6 340 14 working days

Read the Introduction.

"Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2002"

aThe quality of each individual essay makes" Sisters in the Struggle" stand out as an unusual anthology, one whose total sum is actually more than its partsa
--Journal of American History

"Sisters in the Struggle is a powerful, inspirational and insightful book that takes the reader on a journey into the lives of some of the nation's most gifted and courageous African American women leaders, feminist organizers, and Black Power advocates. It was through the dint of their efforts that they helped shape and define what American society should become. These "sheroes" remind us that the prices they paid for freedom bequeathed a legacy of human dignity and opportunity that must be sustained by generations to follow."
--Joyce A. Ladner, author of "Tomorrow's Tomorrow: The Black Woman"

If Bettye Collier-Thomas and V.P. Franklin had only gathered together a distinguished group of scholars to document the role woman played in the black freedom movement, their contribution would be immense. But Sisters in the Struggle is more than an acknowledgment and celebration of black woman's activism. It is a major revision of history, revealing that black women were the critical thinkers, strategists, fighters, and dreamers of the movement. Black feminists developed a social vision expansive enough to emancipate us all."
--Robin D.G. Kelley, author of "Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class"

Women were at the forefront of the civil rights struggle, but their indvidiual stories were rarely heard. Only recently have historians begun to recognize the central role women played in the battle forracial equality.

In Sisters in the Struggle, we hear about the unsung heroes of the civil rights movements such as Ella Baker, who helped found the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper who took on segregation in the Democratic party (and won), and Septima Clark, who created a network of "Citizenship Schools" to teach poor Black men and women to read and write and help them to register to vote. We learn of Black women's activism in the Black Panther Party where they fought the police, as well as the entrenched male leadership, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, where the behind-the-scenes work of women kept the organization afloat when it was under siege. It also includes first-person testimonials from the women who made headlines with their courageous resistance to segregation--Rosa Parks, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, and Dorothy Height.

This collection represents the coming of age of African-American women's history and presents new stories that point the way to future study.

Contributors: Bettye Collier-Thomas, Vicki Crawford, Cynthia Griggs Fleming, V. P. Franklin, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Farah Jasmine Griffin, Duchess Harris, Sharon Harley, Dorothy I. Height, Chana Kai Lee, Tracye Matthews, Genna Rae McNeil, Rosa Parks, Barbara Ransby, Jacqueline A. Rouse, Elaine Moore Smith, and Linda Faye Williams.

The Voting Rights Act - Historical Context and Associated Issues and Trends (Hardcover): Harvey Parish The Voting Rights Act - Historical Context and Associated Issues and Trends (Hardcover)
Harvey Parish
R2,836 R2,510 Discovery Miles 25 100 Save R326 (11%) Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

The Voting Rights Act (VRA) is a landmark federal law enacted in 1965 to remove race-based restrictions on voting. It is perhaps the country's most important voting rights law, with a history that dates to the Civil War. After that conflict ended, a number of constitutional amendments were adopted that addressed the particular circumstances of freed slaves, including the Fifteenth Amendment that guaranteed the right to vote for all U.S. citizens regardless of "race, color, or previous condition of servitude." This book provides background information on the historical circumstances that led to the adoption of the VRA, a summary of its major provisions, and a brief discussion of the U.S. Supreme Court decision and related legislation in the 113th Congress.

Zion in Africa - The Jews of Zambia (Hardcover): Hugh Macmillan, Frank Shapiro Zion in Africa - The Jews of Zambia (Hardcover)
Hugh Macmillan, Frank Shapiro
R2,146 Discovery Miles 21 460 Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

This work represents the definitive account of the Jewish community in central Africa. It tells the story of the coming of the first Jews to the area in the late 19th century, the heyday of the Jewish community in the mid-20th century, and its decline since Zambian independence. Dealing primarily with the Jewish traders in Zambia who flourished in the face of both anti-semitism and their own acute social dislocation, Macmillan explores a number of interrelated topics: the colonial office discussions about Jewish immigration in the 1930s, the attempts to settle refugees in Africa by both pro- and anti-semites, Jewish religious life in the region, and the remarkable cultural and professional role played by the Jewish settlers. Setting these issues in the context of a general history of southern and central Africa, this book constitutes a major contribution to our understanding of the economic history of the entire region. It will be of interest to both historians of Africa and anyone concerned with economic development, identity and immigrant communities.

Town Hall Meetings and the Death of Deliberation (Paperback): Jonathan Beecher Field Town Hall Meetings and the Death of Deliberation (Paperback)
Jonathan Beecher Field
R204 Discovery Miles 2 040 Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

Tracing the erosion of democratic norms in the US and the conditions that make it possible Jonathan Beecher Field tracks the permutations of the town hall meeting from its original context as a form of democratic community governance in New England into a format for presidential debates and a staple of corporate governance. In its contemporary iteration, the town hall meeting models the aesthetic of the former but replaces actual democratic deliberation with a spectacle that involves no immediate electoral stakes or functions as a glorified press conference. Urgently, Field notes that though this evolution might be apparent, evidence suggests many US citizens don't care to differentiate. Forerunners: Ideas First Short books of thought-in-process scholarship, where intense analysis, questioning, and speculation take the lead

When Islam Is Not a Religion - Inside America's Fight for Religious Freedom (Hardcover): Asma T Uddin When Islam Is Not a Religion - Inside America's Fight for Religious Freedom (Hardcover)
Asma T Uddin
R537 R423 Discovery Miles 4 230 Save R114 (21%) 14 working days
Steve Biko (Paperback): Lindy Wilson Steve Biko (Paperback)
Lindy Wilson
R165 R131 Discovery Miles 1 310 Save R34 (21%) Shipped within 11 - 17 working days

The new Jacana series of pocket guides is meant for those who are looking for a brief but lively introduction to a wide range of relevant topics of South African history, politics and biography. Written by some of the leading experts in their fields, the individual volumes are informative and accessible, inexpensive yet well produced, slim enough to put in your pocket and carry with you to read.

Understanding the Path to Citizenship (Hardcover): Kremena Spengler Understanding the Path to Citizenship (Hardcover)
Kremena Spengler
R606 R572 Discovery Miles 5 720 Save R34 (6%) 14 working days
Police Abuse in Contemporary Democracies (Hardcover, 1st ed. 2018): Michelle D. Bonner, Guillermina Seri, Mary Rose Kubal,... Police Abuse in Contemporary Democracies (Hardcover, 1st ed. 2018)
Michelle D. Bonner, Guillermina Seri, Mary Rose Kubal, Michael Kempa
R3,259 R2,030 Discovery Miles 20 300 Save R1,229 (38%) Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

This volume offers a much-needed analysis of police abuse and its implications for our understanding of democracy. Sometimes referred to as police violence or police repression, police abuse occurs in all democracies. It is not an exception or a stage of democratization. It is, this volume argues, a structural and conceptual dimension of extant democracies. The book draws our attention to how including the study of policing into our analyses strengthens our understanding of democracy, including the persistence of hybrid democracy and the decline of democracy. To this end, the book examines three key dimensions of democracy: citizenship, accountability, and socioeconomic (in)equality. Drawing from political theory, comparative politics, and political economy, the book explores cases from France, the US, India, Argentina, Chile, South Africa, Brazil, and Canada, and reveals how integrating police abuse can contribute to a more robust study of democracy and government in general.

Citizenship under Fire - Democratic Education in Times of Conflict (Paperback): Sigal R. Ben-Porath Citizenship under Fire - Democratic Education in Times of Conflict (Paperback)
Sigal R. Ben-Porath
R706 R543 Discovery Miles 5 430 Save R163 (23%) Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

"Citizenship under Fire" examines the relationship among civic education, the culture of war, and the quest for peace. Drawing on examples from Israel and the United States, Sigal Ben-Porath seeks to understand how ideas about citizenship change when a country is at war, and what educators can do to prevent some of the most harmful of these changes.

Perhaps the most worrisome one, Ben-Porath contends, is a growing emphasis in schools and elsewhere on social conformity, on tendentious teaching of history, and on drawing stark distinctions between them and us. As she writes, "The varying characteristics of citizenship in times of war and peace add up to a distinction between belligerent citizenship, which is typical of democracies in wartime, and the liberal democratic citizenship that is characteristic of more peaceful democracies."

Ben-Porath examines how various theories of education--principally peace education, feminist education, and multicultural education--speak to the distinctive challenges of wartime. She argues that none of these theories are satisfactory on their own theoretical terms or would translate easily into practice. In the final chapter, she lays out her own alternative theory--"expansive education"--which she believes holds out more promise of widening the circles of participation in schools, extending the scope of permissible debate, and diversifying the questions asked about the opinions voiced.

The Jim Crow Routine - Everyday Performances of Race, Civil Rights, and Segregation in Mississippi (Paperback): Stephen A Berrey The Jim Crow Routine - Everyday Performances of Race, Civil Rights, and Segregation in Mississippi (Paperback)
Stephen A Berrey
R737 Discovery Miles 7 370 14 working days

The South's system of Jim Crow racial oppression is usually understood in terms of legal segregation that mandated the separation of white and black Americans. Yet, as Stephen A. Berrey shows, it was also a high-stakes drama that played out in the routines of everyday life, where blacks and whites regularly interacted on sidewalks and buses and in businesses and homes. Every day, individuals made, unmade, and remade Jim Crow in how they played their racial roles--how they moved, talked, even gestured. The highly visible but often subtle nature of these interactions constituted the Jim Crow routine. In this study of Mississippi race relations in the final decades of the Jim Crow era, Berrey argues that daily interactions between blacks and whites are central to understanding segregation and the racial system that followed it. Berrey shows how civil rights activism, African Americans' refusal to follow the Jim Crow script, and national perceptions of southern race relations led Mississippi segregationists to change tactics. No longer able to rely on the earlier routines, whites turned instead to less visible but equally insidious practices of violence, surveillance, and policing, rooted in a racially coded language of law and order. Reflecting broader national transformations, these practices laid the groundwork for a new era marked by black criminalization, mass incarceration, and a growing police presence in everyday life.

Social Death - Racialized Rightlessness and the Criminalization of the Unprotected (Paperback): Lisa Marie Cacho Social Death - Racialized Rightlessness and the Criminalization of the Unprotected (Paperback)
Lisa Marie Cacho
R602 Discovery Miles 6 020 14 working days

Winner of the 2013 John Hope Franklin Book Prize presented by the American Studies Association Social Death tackles one of the core paradoxes of social justice struggles and scholarship-that the battle to end oppression shares the moral grammar that structures exploitation and sanctions state violence. Lisa Marie Cacho forcefully argues that the demands for personhood for those who, in the eyes of society, have little value, depend on capitalist and heteropatriarchal measures of worth. With poignant case studies, Cacho illustrates that our very understanding of personhood is premised upon the unchallenged devaluation of criminalized populations of color. Hence, the reliance of rights-based politics on notions of who is and is not a deserving member of society inadvertently replicates the logic that creates and normalizes states of social and literal death. Her understanding of inalienable rights and personhood provides us the much-needed comparative analytical and ethical tools to understand the racialized and nationalized tensions between racial groups. Driven by a radical, relentless critique, Social Death challenges us to imagine a heretofore "unthinkable" politics and ethics that do not rest on neoliberal arguments about worth, but rather emerge from the insurgent experiences of those negated persons who do not live by the norms that determine the productive, patriotic, law abiding, and family-oriented subject. Winner of the 2013 John Hope Franklin Book Prize presented by the American Studies Association Social Death tackles one of the core paradoxes of social justice struggles and scholarship-that the battle to end oppression shares the moral grammar that structures exploitation and sanctions state violence. Lisa Marie Cacho forcefully argues that the demands for personhood for those who, in the eyes of society, have little value, depend on capitalist and heteropatriarchal measures of worth. With poignant case studies, Cacho illustrates that our very understanding of personhood is premised upon the unchallenged devaluation of criminalized populations of color. Hence, the reliance of rights-based politics on notions of who is and is not a deserving member of society inadvertently replicates the logic that creates and normalizes states of social and literal death. Her understanding of inalienable rights and personhood provides us the much-needed comparative analytical and ethical tools to understand the racialized and nationalized tensions between racial groups. Driven by a radical, relentless critique, Social Death challenges us to imagine a heretofore "unthinkable" politics and ethics that do not rest on neoliberal arguments about worth, but rather emerge from the insurgent experiences of those negated persons who do not live by the norms that determine the productive, patriotic, law abiding, and family-oriented subject.

Saving Our Children from the First Amendment (Paperback, New Ed): Kevin W. Saunders Saving Our Children from the First Amendment (Paperback, New Ed)
Kevin W. Saunders
R627 Discovery Miles 6 270 14 working days

View the Table of Contents.
Read the Introduction.

"Brave and appealing. Saunders deserves attention for challenging free-expression orthodoxy."
--"American Journalism Review"

"This is an unusually thoughtful and sophisticated book about what freedom of speech means in the real world. Offers a clear, sensible, and rule-governed system of free speech for the younger generation."
--John Garvey, Boston College Law School

The First Amendment is vital to our political system, our cultural institutions, and our routine social interactions with others. In this provocative book, Kevin Saunders asserts that freedom of expression can be very harmful to our children, making it more likely that they will be the perpetrators or victims of violence, will grow up as racists, or will use alcohol or tobacco.

Saving Our Children from the First Amendment examines both the value and cost of free expression in America, demonstrating how an unregulated flow of information can be detrimental to youth. While the great value of the First Amendment is found in its protection of our most important political freedoms, this is far more significant for adults, who can fully grasp and benefit from the freedom of expression, than for children. Constitutional prohibitions on distributing sexual materials to children, Saunders proposes, should be expanded to include violent, vulgar, or profane materials, as well as music that contains hate speech.

Saunders offers an insightful meditation on the problem of protecting our children from the negative effects of freedom of expression without curtailing First Amendment rights for adults.

None of Your Damn Business - Privacy in the United States from the Gilded Age to the Digital Age (Hardcover): Lawrence Cappello None of Your Damn Business - Privacy in the United States from the Gilded Age to the Digital Age (Hardcover)
Lawrence Cappello
R583 R459 Discovery Miles 4 590 Save R124 (21%) 14 working days

You can't pass through an airport customs checkpoint without having your picture taken and your fingertips scanned, that information stored away in an archive you'll never see. Nor can you use your home's smart technology without occasionally experiencing uncertainty about what, exactly, that technology might do with what you've been sharing about your shopping habits and media choices. Every day, Americans surrender their private information to entities that claim to have their best interests in mind, in exchange for a promise of safety or simply the sake of convenience. This trade-off has long been taken for granted, but the extent of its nefariousness has recently become much more clear. As Lawrence Cappello's None of Your Damn Business reveals, the problem is not so much that data will be used in ways we don't want, but rather how willing we have been to have our information used, abused, and sold right back to us. In this startling book, Cappello shows that this state of affairs was not the inevitable byproduct of technological progress. He targets key moments from the past hundred and thirty years of US history when privacy was central to battles over journalistic freedom, national security, surveillance, big data, and reproductive rights. As he makes dismayingly clear, Americans have had numerous opportunities to protect the public good while simultaneously safeguarding our information, and we've squandered those opportunities every time. The wide range of the debates presented here illustrates how, despite America's long history of praising individual freedom, we actually have one of the weakest systems for privacy protection in the developed world. None of Your Damn Business is a rich and provocative survey of an alarming topic that only grows more relevant with each fresh outrage of trust betrayed.

To Face Down Dixie - South Carolina's War on the Supreme Court in the Age of Civil Rights (Hardcover): James O Heath To Face Down Dixie - South Carolina's War on the Supreme Court in the Age of Civil Rights (Hardcover)
James O Heath
R984 Discovery Miles 9 840 14 working days

In an era during which the United States Supreme Court handed down some of its most important decisions, including Brown v. Board of Education (1954), Baker v. Carr (1962), and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), three senators from South Carolina- Olin Johnston, Strom Thurmond, and Ernest ""Fritz"" Hollings- waged war on the court's progressive agenda by targeting the federal judicial nominations process. To Face Down Dixie explores these senators' role in some of the most contentious confirmation battles in recent history, including those of Thurgood Marshall, Abe Fortas, and Clement Haynsworth. In scrutinizing Supreme Court nominees and attempting to restrict the power of the nine justices of the court, these senators defied not only the leadership of the Democratic Party but also the Senate traditions of hierarchy and seniority. Along with South Carolina's conservative, segregationist political establishment, which maintained ironclad control over the state's legislature, Johnston, Thurmond, and Hollings effectively drowned out the many moderate voices in South Carolina that remained critical of their obstructionism, thus advancing their own conservative credentials and boosting their chances of reelection. To Face Down Dixie examines for the first time the central role that South Carolina played in turning Supreme Court nomination hearings into confrontational and political public events. James O. Heath argues that the state's war on the court concealed its antipathy to civil rights by using the confirmation process to challenge the court's function as the final arbiter of policy on questions relating to law and order, obscenity, communist subversion, and school prayer. Heath's study illustrates that while South Carolina's history of ""massive resistance"" is less prominent than that of other states, its politicians acted as persistent antagonists in the complex and dramatic debates in the U.S. Senate during the era of civil rights.

Rightlessness - Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps since World War II (Paperback): A Naomi Paik Rightlessness - Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps since World War II (Paperback)
A Naomi Paik
R637 Discovery Miles 6 370 14 working days

In this bold book, A. Naomi Paik grapples with the history of U.S. prison camps that have confined people outside the boundaries of legal and civil rights. Removed from the social and political communities that would guarantee fundamental legal protections, these detainees are effectively rightless, stripped of the right even to have rights. Rightless people thus expose an essential paradox: while the United States purports to champion inalienable rights at home and internationally, it has built its global power in part by creating a regime of imprisonment that places certain populations perceived as threats beyond rights. The United States' status as the guardian of rights coincides with, indeed depends on, its creation of rightlessness. Yet rightless people are not silent. Drawing from an expansive testimonial archive of legal proceedings, truth commission records, poetry, and experimental video, Paik shows how rightless people use their imprisonment to protest U.S. state violence. She examines demands for redress by Japanese Americans interned during World War II, testimonies of HIV-positive Haitian refugees detained at Guantanamo in the early 1990s, and appeals by Guantanamo's enemy combatants from the War on Terror. In doing so, she reveals a powerful ongoing contest over the nature and meaning of the law, over civil liberties and global human rights, and over the power of the state in people's lives.

The Power of Nonviolent Resistance - Selected Writings (Paperback): Mohandas Gandhi The Power of Nonviolent Resistance - Selected Writings (Paperback)
Mohandas Gandhi; Edited by Tridip Suhrud
R324 R263 Discovery Miles 2 630 Save R61 (19%) 14 working days

The Power of Nonviolent Resistance is a comprehensive selection of writings from one of the twentieth century's greatest figures. Bringing together excerpts, letters and essays from some of his most celebrated texts including Hind Swaraj, Satyagraha in South Africa and Yeravda Mandir, this volume offers readers an insightful understanding of Gandhi's views on non-violent civil disobedience and activism.

The Women's Suffrage Cookery Book (Hardcover): Mrs Aubrey Dowson The Women's Suffrage Cookery Book (Hardcover)
Mrs Aubrey Dowson 1
R251 R201 Discovery Miles 2 010 Save R50 (20%) 14 working days

Enjoy hearty wholesome meals courtesy of the foot soldiers of the Women's Suffrage movement. The recipes in this book cover every meal of the day, as well as sections on vegetarian dishes, beverages and preserves. Choose between a Curry contributed by Mrs Julian Osler from Edgbaston, Cauliflower Souffle sent in by Miss Mildred Martineau of Esher, Eggs a la Suisse contributed by Mrs Gerard Dowson of Radcliffe-on-Trent, and Madeira Marmalade supplied by Miss Ethel Jacobs of Hull. There is also a section of miscellaneous hints and tips that cover all manner of things from recipes to making furniture polish or a tincture for soothing burns, to getting rid of moths in carpets or an infestation of ants. The book ends with a section on 'Menus for Meals for Suffrage Workers' with a selection of dishes that 'must be simple and such as can be eaten quickly, and also ... which will keep hot without spoiling and can be eaten with impunity at any hour'. As a snapshot of history and a very useful resource for simple homemade meals, this book is a rare treat.

Fifty Miles Wide (Paperback): Julian Sayarer Fifty Miles Wide (Paperback)
Julian Sayarer
R253 R208 Discovery Miles 2 080 Save R45 (18%) Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

Ten years after breaking a world record for cycling around the world, award-winning travel writer Julian Sayarer returns to two wheels on the roads of Israel and occupied Palestine. His route weaves from the ancient hills of Galilee, along the blockaded walls of the Gaza Strip and down to the Bedouin villages of the Naqab Desert. He speaks with Palestinian hip-hop artists who wonder if music can change their world, Israelis hoping that kibbutz life can, and Palestinian cycling clubs determined to keep on riding despite the army checkpoints and settlers that bar their way. Pedalling through a military occupation, in the chance encounters of the roadside, a bicycle becomes a vehicle of more than just travel, and cuts through the tension to find a few simple truths, and some hope. As the miles pass, the journey becomes a meditation on making change - how people in dark times keep their spirit, and go on believing that a different world is possible.

Strange Neighbors - The Role of States in Immigration Policy (Hardcover): Carissa Byrne Hessick, Gabriel J. Chin Strange Neighbors - The Role of States in Immigration Policy (Hardcover)
Carissa Byrne Hessick, Gabriel J. Chin
R980 Discovery Miles 9 800 14 working days

Since its founding, the U.S. has struggled with issues of federalism and states' rights. In almost every area of law, from abortion to zoning, conflicts arise between the states and the federal government over which entity is best suited to create and enforce laws. In the last decade, immigration has been on the front lines of this debate, with states such as Arizona taking an extremely assertive role in policing immigrants within their borders. While Arizona and its notorious SB 1070 is the most visible example of states claiming expanded responsibility to make and enforce immigration law, it is far from alone. An ordinance in Hazelton, Pennsylvania prohibited landlords from renting to the undocumented. Several states have introduced legislation to deny citizenship to babies who are born to parents who are in the United States without authorization. Other states have also enacted legislation aimed at driving out unauthorized migrants. Strange Neighbors explores the complicated and complicating role of the states in immigration policy and enforcement, including voices from both sides of the debate. While many contributors point to the dangers inherent in state regulation of immigration policy, at least two support it, while others offer empirically-based examinations of state efforts to regulate immigration within their borders, pointing to wide, state-by-state disparities in locally-administered immigration policies and laws. Ultimately, the book offers an extremely timely, thorough, and spirited discussion on an issue that will continue to dominate state and federal legislatures for years to come.

Agent of Change - Adela Sloss-Vento, Mexican American Civil Rights Activist and Texas Feminist (Hardcover): Cynthia E Orozco Agent of Change - Adela Sloss-Vento, Mexican American Civil Rights Activist and Texas Feminist (Hardcover)
Cynthia E Orozco
R797 Discovery Miles 7 970 Shipped within 20 - 25 working days

The essayist Adela Sloss-Vento (1901-1998) was a powerhouse of activism in South Texas's Lower Rio Grande Valley throughout the Mexican American civil rights movement beginning in 1920 and the subsequent Chicano movement of the 1960s and 1970s. At last presenting the full story of Sloss-Vento's achievements, Agent of Change revives a forgotten history of a major female Latina leader. Bringing to light the economic and political transformations that swept through South Texas in the 1920s as ranching declined and agribusiness proliferated, Cynthia E. Orozco situates Sloss-Vento's early years within the context of the Jim Crow/Juan Crow era. Recounting Sloss-Vento's rise to prominence as a public intellectual, Orozco highlights a partnership with Alonso S. Perales, the principal founder of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Agent of Change explores such contradictions as Sloss-Vento's tolerance of LULAC's gender-segregated chapters, even though the activist was an outspoken critic of male privilege in the home and a decidedly progressive wife and mother. Inspiring and illuminating, this is a complete portrait of a savvy, brazen critic who demanded reform on both sides of the US-Mexico border.

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