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Books > Social sciences > Politics & government > Political control & freedoms > Human rights > Civil rights & citizenship

The Verso Book of Dissent - Revolutionary Words from Three Millennia of  Rebellion and Resistance (Paperback): Andrew Hsiao,... The Verso Book of Dissent - Revolutionary Words from Three Millennia of Rebellion and Resistance (Paperback)
Andrew Hsiao, Audrea Lim 1
R291 R247 Discovery Miles 2 470 Save R44 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Throughout the ages and across every continent, people have struggled against those in power and raised their voices in protest--rallying others around them and inspiring uprisings in eras yet to come. Their echoes reverberate from Ancient Greece, China and Egypt, via the dissident poets and philosophers of Islam and Judaism, through to the Arab slave revolts and anti-Ottoman rebellions of the Middle Ages. These sources were tapped during the Dutch and English revolutions at the outset of the Modern world, and in turn flowed into the French, Haitian, American, Russian and Chinese revolutions. More recently, resistance to war and economic oppression has flared up on battlefields and in public spaces from Beijing and Baghdad to Caracas and Los Angeles. This anthology, global in scope, presents voices of dissent from every era of human history: speeches and pamphlets, poems and songs, plays and manifestos. Every age has its iconoclasts, and yet the greatest among them build on the words and actions of their forerunners. The Verso Book of Dissent will become an invaluable resource, reminding today's citizens that these traditions will never die.

What the Hell Do You Have to Lose? - Trump's War on Civil Rights (Hardcover): Juan Williams What the Hell Do You Have to Lose? - Trump's War on Civil Rights (Hardcover)
Juan Williams
R567 R475 Discovery Miles 4 750 Save R92 (16%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Unsympathetic, ambiguous, and openly racist remarks are a hallmark of Donald Trump's public life. They may have reached their nadir after he failed to condemn white supremacy in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville, but perhaps no remark of his is more telling than his campaign pitch to African Americans: "What the hell do you have to lose?" Quite a lot, as it turns out. In this vigorous and timely book, civil rights historian and political analyst Juan Williams issues the truth about just what African Americans have to lose, and how Trump is threatening to take it away. In Williams's lifetime, civil rights have improved, vastly and against great resistance -- including from Trump and his family. Using the 1964 Civil Rights Act as a rubric, Williams recounts the less known and forgotten stories of heroes like Bob Moses, A. Philip Randolph, and Everett Dirksen, who fought for voting rights, integration of public schools and spaces, and more. This book is not merely a much-needed and highly visible history lesson. It signals the alarm about the Trump administration's policies and intentions, which pose a threat to civil rights without precedent in modern America. In a polarized era, it's especially telling when moderates like Williams are prepared to stand up and shout. This book is clear-sighted, inspiring, and necessary, from an author with the experience and standing to make it heard.

Projecting Race - Postwar America, Civil Rights, and Documentary Film (Paperback): Stephen Charbonneau Projecting Race - Postwar America, Civil Rights, and Documentary Film (Paperback)
Stephen Charbonneau
R689 R546 Discovery Miles 5 460 Save R143 (21%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Projecting Race presents a history of educational documentary filmmaking in the postwar era in light of race relations and the fight for civil rights. Drawing on extensive archival research and textual analyses, the volume tracks the evolution of race-based, nontheatrical cinema from its neorealist roots to its incorporation of new documentary techniques intent on recording reality in real time. The films featured include classic documentaries, such as Sidney Meyers's The Quiet One (1948), and a range of familiar and less familiar state-sponsored educational documentaries from George Stoney (Palmour Street, 1950; All My Babies, 1953; and The Man in the Middle, 1966) and the Drew Associates (Another Way, 1967). Final chapters highlight community-development films jointly produced by the National Film Board of Canada and the Office of Economic Opportunity (The Farmersville Project, 1968; The Hartford Project, 1969) in rural and industrial settings. Featuring testimonies from farm workers, activists, and government officials, the films reflect communities in crisis, where organized and politically active racial minorities upended the status quo. Ultimately, this work traces the postwar contours of a liberal racial outlook as government agencies came to grips with profound and inescapable social change.

Come and Take It - The Gun Printer's Guide to Thinking Free (Paperback): Cody Wilson Come and Take It - The Gun Printer's Guide to Thinking Free (Paperback)
Cody Wilson
R397 R371 Discovery Miles 3 710 Save R26 (7%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Civilian Internment in Canada - Histories and Legacies (Paperback): Rhonda L. Hinther, Jim Mochoruk Civilian Internment in Canada - Histories and Legacies (Paperback)
Rhonda L. Hinther, Jim Mochoruk
R820 R641 Discovery Miles 6 410 Save R179 (22%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Civilian Internment in Canada examines abuse of the civil rights and liberties of tens of thousands of Canadians and Canadian residents via internment from 1914 to the present day. This ongoing story spans both war and peacetime and has affected people from a wide variety of political backgrounds and ethno-cultural communities, bequeathing a complex legacy for survivors and their descendants. Despite the well-known impounding of tens of thousands of Japanese, Ukrainians, assorted eastern Europeans, Germans, and Italians as 'enemy aliens' during the two World Wars, civilian internment in this country has not been widely discussed, particularly in comparative ways. Indeed, there has been a propensity to sweep these events under the proverbial rug, keeping them out of the national discourse. Civilian Internment in Canada brings together senior scholars in the field of internment and civil liberties studies with emerging scholars, graduate students, community members, teachers, public historians, artists, former internees, descendants of internees, and redress activists to examine the processes and consequences of civilian internment during real and perceived wartime contexts, ranging from the Great War to the Cold War to the 'War on Terror.' It demonstrates the ways in which 'shared authority' between scholars and subjects can both reshape our understanding of crucial episodes in Canada's history and bring a sense of vibrancy and immediacy to the all-too current question of civil liberties and minority rights in today's security state.

When All Else Fails - The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice (Hardcover): Jason Brennan When All Else Fails - The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice (Hardcover)
Jason Brennan
R621 R500 Discovery Miles 5 000 Save R121 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Why you have the right to resist unjust government The economist Albert O. Hirschman famously argued that citizens of democracies have only three possible responses to injustice or wrongdoing by their governments: we may leave, complain, or comply. But in When All Else Fails, Jason Brennan argues that there is a fourth option. When governments violate our rights, we may resist. We may even have a moral duty to do so. For centuries, almost everyone has believed that we must allow the government and its representatives to act without interference, no matter how they behave. We may complain, protest, sue, or vote officials out, but we can't fight back. But Brennan makes the case that we have no duty to allow the state or its agents to commit injustice. We have every right to react with acts of "uncivil disobedience." We may resist arrest for violation of unjust laws. We may disobey orders, sabotage government property, or reveal classified information. We may deceive ignorant, irrational, or malicious voters. We may even use force in self-defense or to defend others. The result is a provocative challenge to long-held beliefs about how citizens may respond when government officials behave unjustly or abuse their power.

Difficult Women - A History of Feminism in 11 Fights (Paperback): Helen Lewis Difficult Women - A History of Feminism in 11 Fights (Paperback)
Helen Lewis 1
R340 R267 Discovery Miles 2 670 Save R73 (21%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Well-behaved women don't make history: difficult women do. Helen Lewis argues that feminism's success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It's time to reclaim the history of feminism as a history of difficult women. In this book, you'll meet the working-class suffragettes who advocated bombings and arson; the princess who discovered why so many women were having bad sex; the pioneer of the refuge movement who became a men's rights activist; the 'striker in a sari' who terrified Margaret Thatcher; the wronged Victorian wife who definitely wasn't sleeping with the prime minister; and the lesbian politician who outraged the country. Taking the story up to the present with the twenty-first-century campaign for abortion services, Helen Lewis reveals the unvarnished - and unfinished - history of women's rights. Drawing on archival research and interviews, Difficult Women is a funny, fearless and sometimes shocking narrative history, which shows why the feminist movement has succeeded - and what it should do next. The battle is difficult, and we must be difficult too.

Social Death - Racialized Rightlessness and the Criminalization of the Unprotected (Paperback): Lisa Marie Cacho Social Death - Racialized Rightlessness and the Criminalization of the Unprotected (Paperback)
Lisa Marie Cacho
R608 R516 Discovery Miles 5 160 Save R92 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Winner of the 2013 John Hope Franklin Book Prize presented by the American Studies Association Social Death tackles one of the core paradoxes of social justice struggles and scholarship-that the battle to end oppression shares the moral grammar that structures exploitation and sanctions state violence. Lisa Marie Cacho forcefully argues that the demands for personhood for those who, in the eyes of society, have little value, depend on capitalist and heteropatriarchal measures of worth. With poignant case studies, Cacho illustrates that our very understanding of personhood is premised upon the unchallenged devaluation of criminalized populations of color. Hence, the reliance of rights-based politics on notions of who is and is not a deserving member of society inadvertently replicates the logic that creates and normalizes states of social and literal death. Her understanding of inalienable rights and personhood provides us the much-needed comparative analytical and ethical tools to understand the racialized and nationalized tensions between racial groups. Driven by a radical, relentless critique, Social Death challenges us to imagine a heretofore "unthinkable" politics and ethics that do not rest on neoliberal arguments about worth, but rather emerge from the insurgent experiences of those negated persons who do not live by the norms that determine the productive, patriotic, law abiding, and family-oriented subject. Winner of the 2013 John Hope Franklin Book Prize presented by the American Studies Association Social Death tackles one of the core paradoxes of social justice struggles and scholarship-that the battle to end oppression shares the moral grammar that structures exploitation and sanctions state violence. Lisa Marie Cacho forcefully argues that the demands for personhood for those who, in the eyes of society, have little value, depend on capitalist and heteropatriarchal measures of worth. With poignant case studies, Cacho illustrates that our very understanding of personhood is premised upon the unchallenged devaluation of criminalized populations of color. Hence, the reliance of rights-based politics on notions of who is and is not a deserving member of society inadvertently replicates the logic that creates and normalizes states of social and literal death. Her understanding of inalienable rights and personhood provides us the much-needed comparative analytical and ethical tools to understand the racialized and nationalized tensions between racial groups. Driven by a radical, relentless critique, Social Death challenges us to imagine a heretofore "unthinkable" politics and ethics that do not rest on neoliberal arguments about worth, but rather emerge from the insurgent experiences of those negated persons who do not live by the norms that determine the productive, patriotic, law abiding, and family-oriented subject.

Contracting Human Rights - Crisis, Accountability, and Opportunity (Paperback): Alison Brysk, Michael Stohl Contracting Human Rights - Crisis, Accountability, and Opportunity (Paperback)
Alison Brysk, Michael Stohl
R835 Discovery Miles 8 350 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The securitization that accompanied many national responses after 11 September 2001, along with the shortfalls of neo-liberalism, created waves of opposition to the growth of the human rights regime. By chronicling the continuing contest over the reach, range, and regime of rights, Contracting Human Rights analyses the way forward in an era of many challenges. f Through an examination of both global and local challenges to human rights, including loopholes, backlash, accountability, and new opportunities to move forward, the expert contributors analyse trends across multiple-issue areas. These include; international institutions, humanitarian action, censorship and communications, discrimination, human trafficking, counter-terrorism, corporate social responsibility and civil society and social movements. The topical chapters also provide a comprehensive review of the widening citizenship gaps in human rights coverage for refugees, women's rights in patriarchal societies, and civil liberties in chronic conflict. This timely study will be invaluable reading for academics, upper-level undergraduates, and those studying graduate courses relating to international relations, human rights, and global governance.

Digital Citizenship in a Datafied Society (Paperback): Arne Hintz, Lina Dencik, Karin Wahl-Jorgensen Digital Citizenship in a Datafied Society (Paperback)
Arne Hintz, Lina Dencik, Karin Wahl-Jorgensen
R435 Discovery Miles 4 350 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Digitization has transformed the way we interact with our social, political and economic environments. While it has enhanced the potential for citizen agency, it has also enabled the collection and analysis of unprecedented amounts of personal data. This requires us to fundamentally rethink our understanding of digital citizenship, based on an awareness of the ways in which citizens are increasingly monitored, categorized, sorted and profiled. Drawing on extensive empirical research, Digital Citizenship in a Datafied Society offers a new understanding of citizenship in an age defined by data collection and processing. The book traces the social forces that shape digital citizenship by investigating regulatory frameworks, mediated public debate, citizens' knowledge and understanding, and possibilities for dissent and resistance.

White Balance - How Hollywood Shaped Colorblind Ideology and Undermined Civil Rights (Paperback): Justin Gomer White Balance - How Hollywood Shaped Colorblind Ideology and Undermined Civil Rights (Paperback)
Justin Gomer
R783 Discovery Miles 7 830 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The racial ideology of colorblindness has a long history. In 1963, Martin Luther King famously stated, "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." However, in the decades after the civil rights movement, the ideology of colorblindness co-opted the language of the civil rights era in order to reinvent white supremacy and dismantle the civil rights movement's legal victories without offending political decorum. Yet, the spread of colorblindness could not merely happen through political speeches, newspapers, or books. The key, Justin Gomer contends, was film--as race-conscious language was expelled from public discourse, Hollywood provided the visual medium necessary to dramatize an anti-civil rights agenda over the course of the 70s, 80s, and 90s. In blockbusters like Dirty Harry, Rocky, and Dangerous Minds, filmmakers capitalized upon the volatile racial, social, and economic struggles in the decades after the civil rights movement, shoring up a powerful, bipartisan ideology that would be wielded against race-conscious policy, the memory of black freedom struggles, and core aspects of the liberal state itself.

Rightlessness - Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps since World War II (Paperback): A Naomi Paik Rightlessness - Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps since World War II (Paperback)
A Naomi Paik
R785 Discovery Miles 7 850 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In this bold book, A. Naomi Paik grapples with the history of U.S. prison camps that have confined people outside the boundaries of legal and civil rights. Removed from the social and political communities that would guarantee fundamental legal protections, these detainees are effectively rightless, stripped of the right even to have rights. Rightless people thus expose an essential paradox: while the United States purports to champion inalienable rights at home and internationally, it has built its global power in part by creating a regime of imprisonment that places certain populations perceived as threats beyond rights. The United States' status as the guardian of rights coincides with, indeed depends on, its creation of rightlessness. Yet rightless people are not silent. Drawing from an expansive testimonial archive of legal proceedings, truth commission records, poetry, and experimental video, Paik shows how rightless people use their imprisonment to protest U.S. state violence. She examines demands for redress by Japanese Americans interned during World War II, testimonies of HIV-positive Haitian refugees detained at Guantanamo in the early 1990s, and appeals by Guantanamo's enemy combatants from the War on Terror. In doing so, she reveals a powerful ongoing contest over the nature and meaning of the law, over civil liberties and global human rights, and over the power of the state in people's lives.

Touched with Fire - Morris B. Abram and the Battle Against Racial and Religious Discrimination (Hardcover): David E. Lowe Touched with Fire - Morris B. Abram and the Battle Against Racial and Religious Discrimination (Hardcover)
David E. Lowe
R707 R560 Discovery Miles 5 600 Save R147 (21%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Morris B. Abram had one hell of a career. Rising from humble origins in the small Georgia town of Fitzgerald, by the end of his life his resume included participation in the prosecution of Nazi war criminals; service as the first General Counsel of the Peace Corps; the presidency of the American Jewish Committee and Brandeis University; and chairmanship of the United Negro College Fund, the Moreland Commission investigation of nursing homes in the state of New York, and the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations-all while gaining prominence as a highly successful trial lawyer. Remembered most for his fight in the civil rights movement and establishing the "one man, one vote" law, Abram's career was not without fault. His reputation took a turn during his presidency at Brandeis University when his frustration with the politicization of the university alienated students, faculty, and trustees, and he eventually became a pariah in the very movement he helped to shape. A major source of contention was over the establishment of a Black Studies Department, which exposed Abram to what he regarded as the ills of racial separatism. When the leadership of what remained of the civil rights movement moved away from opposition to racial discrimination to the promotion of racial preference, Abram warned that what they were advocating was the mirror image of the racism he spent most of his life fighting. In Touched with Fire, David Lowe chronicles the professional and personal life of this larger-than-life man. With a unique personal connection to Abram's presidency at Brandeis, Lowe adds a rare contextual perspective on the events that transpired. Having dealt with many of the contentious issues we still face today, Abram's varied career sheds light on current affairs, such as legislative apportionment, affirmative action, campus unrest, and the enforcement of international human rights.

Handbook of Political Citizenship and Social Movements (Paperback): Hein-Anton van der Heijden Handbook of Political Citizenship and Social Movements (Paperback)
Hein-Anton van der Heijden
R1,163 Discovery Miles 11 630 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Since the 1960s, social movements and political citizenship have become buzzwords not only in social and political life but also in social and political science. The impact of the environmental and women's movements, and the advance of multicultural, European and cosmopolitan citizenship in modern history are cases in point. The study of citizenship traditionally refers to the individual dimension of social and political behavior. Social movement studies, however, refer to the collective dimension of such behavior. Despite distinct trajectories in their theoretical development, the social movement and citizenship paradigms converge where social movements are viewed as collective forms of political citizenship. This Handbook uniquely collates results of several decades of academic research in these two fields. The expert contributions successively address the different forms of political citizenship and current approaches and recent developments in social movement studies. Salient social movements in recent history are explored in depth, covering the environmental, women's, international human rights, urban, Tea Party, and animal rights movements. Social movements and political citizenship in the 'global South': China, India, Africa, and the Arab World, are discussed, presenting a novel empirical insight into these fields of study. Social scientists, MA and PhD students conducting research in social movements and citizenship, at a theoretical and empirical level, will benefit from the authoritative assessment of forms of political citizenship and major developments in social movement studies.

Edexcel A Level History, Paper 3: Civil rights and race relations in the USA, 1850-2009 Student Book + ActiveBook (Paperback):... Edexcel A Level History, Paper 3: Civil rights and race relations in the USA, 1850-2009 Student Book + ActiveBook (Paperback)
Derrick Murphy
R583 Discovery Miles 5 830 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This book: covers the essential content in the new specifications in a rigorous and engaging way, using detailed narrative, sources, timelines, key words, helpful activities and extension material helps develop conceptual understanding of areas such as evidence, interpretations, causation and change, through targeted activities provides assessment support for A level with sample answers, sources, practice questions and guidance to help you tackle the new-style exam questions. It also comes with three years' access to an ActiveBook, an online, digital version of your textbook to help you personalise your learning as you go through the course - perfect for revision.

Migration and Freedom - Mobility, Citizenship and Exclusion (Paperback): Brad K. Blitz Migration and Freedom - Mobility, Citizenship and Exclusion (Paperback)
Brad K. Blitz
R754 Discovery Miles 7 540 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Migration and Freedom is a thorough and revealing exploration of the complex relationship between mobility and citizenship in Europe. Brad Blitz draws upon European and international law, political theory, economics, history and contemporary studies of migration to provide an original account of the opportunities and challenges associated with the right to free movement in Europe and beyond. Integrating over 160 interviews with individuals in Croatia, Slovenia, Italy, Spain, the UK and Russia, this book provides a unique focus on both internal and inter-state mobility and a re-evaluation of the concept of freedom of movement. The author documents successful and unsuccessful settlement and establishment cases and records how both official and informal restrictions on individuals' mobility have effectively created new categories of citizenship and exclusion within Europe. This book is an original study aimed at academics, students and government officials interested in migration, international studies, public and social policy, and politics.

Brown v. Board and the Transformation of American Culture - Education and the South in the Age of Desegregation (Hardcover):... Brown v. Board and the Transformation of American Culture - Education and the South in the Age of Desegregation (Hardcover)
Ben Keppel
R1,137 Discovery Miles 11 370 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Brown v. Board of Education, which ended legally sanctioned segregation in American public schools, brought issues of racial equality to the forefront of the nation's attention. Beyond its repercussions for the educational system, the decision also heralded broad changes to concepts of justice and national identity. ""Brown v. Board"" and the Transformation of American Culture examines the prominent cultural figures who taught the country how to embrace new values and ideas of citizenship in the aftermath of this groundbreaking decision. Through the lens of three cultural ""first responders,"" Ben Keppel tracks the creation of an American culture in which race, class, and ethnicity could cease to imply an inferior form of citizenship. Psychiatrist and social critic Robert Coles, in his Pulitzer Prize--winning studies of children and schools in desegregating regions of the country, helped citizens understand the value of the project of racial equality in the lives of regular families, both white and black. Comedian Bill Cosby leveraged his success with gentle, family-centric humor to create televised spaces that challenged the idea of whiteness as the cultural default. Public television producer Joan Ganz Cooney designed programs like Sesame Street that extended educational opportunities to impoverished children, while offering a new vision of urban life in which diverse populations coexisted in an atmosphere of harmony and mutual support. Together, the work of these pioneering figures provided new codes of conduct and guided America through the growing pains of becoming a truly pluralistic nation. In this cultural history of the impact of Brown v. Board, Keppel paints a vivid picture of a society at once eager for and resistant to the changes ushered in by this pivotal decision.

Overturning Brown - The Segregationist Legacy of the Modern School Choice Movement (Hardcover): Steve Suitts Overturning Brown - The Segregationist Legacy of the Modern School Choice Movement (Hardcover)
Steve Suitts
R741 Discovery Miles 7 410 Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Political Communication - A Critical Introduction (Paperback, 1st ed. 2017): Heather Savigny Political Communication - A Critical Introduction (Paperback, 1st ed. 2017)
Heather Savigny
R810 Discovery Miles 8 100 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This major international text introduces the key themes, issues and theoretical approaches in the field. A central concern is to put the politics back into the study of communication by posing key critical questions about power and ideology: what is being communicated, by whom, how, in whose interests, and with what effects and implications?

The Politics of Gay Marriage in Latin America - Argentina, Chile, and Mexico (Hardcover): Jordi D iez The Politics of Gay Marriage in Latin America - Argentina, Chile, and Mexico (Hardcover)
Jordi D iez
R922 Discovery Miles 9 220 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Addressing one of the defining social issues of our time, The Politics of Gay Marriage in Latin America explores how and why Latin America, a culturally Catholic and historically conservative region, has become a leader among nations of the Global South, and even the Global North, in the passage of gay marriage legislation. In the first comparative study of its kind, Jordi Diez explains cross-national variation in the enactment of gay marriage in three countries: Argentina, Chile, and Mexico. Based on extensive interviews in the three countries, Diez argues that three main key factors explain variation in policy outcomes across these cases: the strength of social movement networks forged by activists in favor of gay marriage; the access to policy making afforded by particular national political institutions; and the resonance of the frames used to demand the expansion of marriage rights to same-sex couples.

Learning One's Native Tongue - Citizenship, Contestation, and Conflict in America (Paperback): Tracy B. Strong Learning One's Native Tongue - Citizenship, Contestation, and Conflict in America (Paperback)
Tracy B. Strong
R666 Discovery Miles 6 660 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Citizenship is much more than the right to vote. It is a collection of political capacities constantly up for debate. From Socrates to contemporary American politics, the question of what it means to be an authentic citizen is an inherently political one. With Learning One's Native Tongue, Tracy B. Strong explores the development of the concept of American citizenship and what it means to belong to this country, starting with the Puritans in the seventeenth century and continuing to the present day. He examines the conflicts over the meaning of citizenship means in the writings and speeches of prominent thinkers and leaders ranging from John Winthrop and Roger Williams to Thomas Jefferson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Franklin Roosevelt, among many others who have participated in these important cultural and political debates. The criteria that define what being a citizen entails change over time and in response to historical developments, and they are thus also often the source of controversy and conflict, as with voting rights for women and African Americans. Strong looks closely at these conflicts and the ensuing changes in the conception of citizenship, paying attention to what difference each change makes and what each particular conception entails socially and politically.

The Night Malcolm X Spoke at the Oxford Union - A Transatlantic Story of Antiracist Protest (Hardcover): Stephen Tuck The Night Malcolm X Spoke at the Oxford Union - A Transatlantic Story of Antiracist Protest (Hardcover)
Stephen Tuck; Foreword by Henry Louis Gates
R562 R456 Discovery Miles 4 560 Save R106 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Less than three months before he was assassinated, Malcolm X spoke at the Oxford Union the most prestigious student debating organization in the United Kingdom. The Oxford Union regularly welcomed heads of state and stars of screen and served as the training ground for the politically ambitious offspring of Britain's better classes. Malcolm X, by contrast, was the global icon of race militancy. For many, he personified revolution and danger. Marking the fiftieth anniversary of the debate, this book brings to life the dramatic events surrounding the visit, showing why Oxford invited Malcolm X, why he accepted, and the effect of the visit on Malcolm X and British students. Stephen Tuck tells the human story behind the debate and also uses it as a starting point to discuss larger issues of Black Power, the end of empire, British race relations, immigration, and student rights. Coinciding with a student-led campaign against segregated housing, the visit enabled Malcolm X to make connections with radical students from the Caribbean, Africa, and South Asia, giving him a new perspective on the global struggle for racial equality, and in turn, radicalizing a new generation of British activists. Masterfully tracing the reverberations on both sides of the Atlantic, Tuck chronicles how the personal transformation of the dynamic American leader played out on the international stage.

Soldier of Change - From the Closet to the Forefront of the Gay Rights Movement (Hardcover): Stephen Snyder-Hill Soldier of Change - From the Closet to the Forefront of the Gay Rights Movement (Hardcover)
Stephen Snyder-Hill
R411 R318 Discovery Miles 3 180 Save R93 (23%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

When "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," the official U.S. policy on gays serving in the military, was repealed in September 2011, soldier Stephen Snyder-Hill (then Captain Hill) was serving in Iraq. Having endured years of this policy, which passively encouraged a culture of fear and secrecy for gay soldiers, Snyder-Hill submitted a video to a Republican primary debate (held two days after the repeal). In the video he asked for the Republicans' thoughts regarding the repeal and their plans, if any, to extend spousal benefits to legally married gay and lesbian soldiers. His video was booed by the audience on national television. Soldier of Change captures not only the media frenzy that followed that moment, placing Snyder-Hill at the forefront of this modern civil rights movement, but also his twenty-year journey as a gay man in the army: from self-loathing to self-acceptance, to the most important battle of his life-protecting the disenfranchised. Since that time, Snyder-Hill has traveled the country with his husband, giving interviews on major news networks and speaking at universities, community centers, and pride parades, a champion of LGBT equality.

Wilmington's Lie - The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy (Hardcover): David Zucchino Wilmington's Lie - The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy (Hardcover)
David Zucchino
R675 R538 Discovery Miles 5 380 Save R137 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

From Pulitzer Prize-winner David Zucchino comes a searing account of the Wilmington riot and coup of 1898, an extraordinary event unknown to most Americans By the 1890s, Wilmington was North Carolina's largest city and a shining example of a mixed-race community. It was a bustling port city with a burgeoning African American middle class and a Fusionist government of Republicans and Populists that included black aldermen, police officers and magistrates. There were successful black-owned businesses and an African American newspaper, The Record. But across the state--and the South--white supremacist Democrats were working to reverse the advances made by former slaves and their progeny. In 1898, in response to a speech calling for white men to rise to the defense of Southern womanhood against the supposed threat of black predators, Alexander Manly, the outspoken young Record editor, wrote that some relationships between black men and white women were consensual. His editorial ignited outrage across the South, with calls to lynch Manly. But North Carolina's white supremacist Democrats had a different strategy. They were plotting to take back the state legislature in November "by the ballot or bullet or both," and then use the Manly editorial to trigger a "race riot" to overthrow Wilmington's multi-racial government. Led by prominent citizens including Josephus Daniels, publisher of the state's largest newspaper, and former Confederate Colonel Alfred Moore Waddell, white supremacists rolled out a carefully orchestrated campaign that included raucous rallies, race-baiting editorials and newspaper cartoons, and sensational, fabricated news stories. With intimidation and violence, the Democrats suppressed the black vote and stuffed ballot boxes (or threw them out), to win control of the state legislature on November eighth. Two days later, more than 2,000 heavily armed Red Shirts swarmed through Wilmington, torching the Record office, terrorizing women and children, and shooting at least sixty black men dead in the streets. The rioters forced city officials to resign at gunpoint and replaced them with mob leaders. Prominent blacks--and sympathetic whites--were banished. Hundreds of terrified black families took refuge in surrounding swamps and forests. This brutal insurrection is a rare instance of a violent overthrow of an elected government in the U.S. It halted gains made by blacks and restored racism as official government policy, cementing white rule for another half century. It was not a "race riot," as the events of November 1898 came to be known, but rather a racially motivated rebellion launched by white supremacists. In Wilmington's Lie, Pulitzer Prize-winner David Zucchino uses contemporary newspaper accounts, diaries, letters and official communications to create a gripping and compelling narrative that weaves together individual stories of hate and fear and brutality. This is a dramatic and definitive account of a remarkable but forgotten chapter of American history.

A Boy from Georgia - Coming of Age in the Segregated South (Paperback): Hamilton Jordan A Boy from Georgia - Coming of Age in the Segregated South (Paperback)
Hamilton Jordan; Edited by Kathleen Jordan; Foreword by Jimmy Carter
R540 R434 Discovery Miles 4 340 Save R106 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

When Hamilton Jordan died of peritoneal mesothelioma in 2008, he left behind a mostly finished memoir, a book on which he had been working for the last decade. Jordan's daughter, Kathleen - with the help of her brothers and mother -took up the task of editing and completing the book. A Boy from Georgia - the result of this posthumous father-daughter collaboration - chronicles Hamilton Jordan's childhood in Albany, Georgia, charting his moral and intellectual development as he gradually discovers the complicated legacies of racism, religious intolerance, and southern politics, and affords his readers an intimate view of the state's wheelers and dealers. Jordan's middle-class childhood was bucolic in some ways and traumatizing in others. As Georgia politicians battled civil rights leaders, a young Hamilton straddled the uncomfortable line between the southern establishment to which he belonged and the movement in which he believed. Fortunate enough to grow up in a family that had considerable political clout within Georgia, Jordan went into politics to put his ideals to work. Eventually he became a key aide to Jimmy Carter and was the architect of Carter's stunning victory in the presidential campaign of 1976; Jordan later served as Carter's chief of staff. Clear eyed about the triumphs and tragedies of Jordan's beloved home state and region, A Boy from Georgia tells the story of a remarkable life in a voice that is witty, vivid, and honest.

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