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Books > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Early Church

The Irrational Augustine (Hardcover): Catherine Conybeare The Irrational Augustine (Hardcover)
Catherine Conybeare
R4,138 Discovery Miles 41 380 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The Irrational Augustine takes the notion of St Augustine as rigid and dogmatic Father of the Church and turns it on its head. Catherine Conybeare reads Augustine's earliest works to discover the anti-dogmatic Augustine, who values changeability and human interconnectedness and deplores social exclusion. The novelty of her book lies in taking seriously the nature of these early works as performances, through which multiple questions can be raised and multiple options explored, both in words and through their dramatic framework. The theological consequences are considerable. A very human Augustine emerges, talking and playing with friends and family, including his mother - and a very sympathetic set of ideas is the result.

Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (Paperback, New edition): Judith Lieu Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (Paperback, New edition)
Judith Lieu
R1,443 Discovery Miles 14 430 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

'I am a Christian' is the confession of the martyrs of early Christian texts and, no doubt, of many others; but what did this confession mean, and how was early Christian identity constructed? This innovative study sets the emergence of Christian identity in the first two centuries, as it is constructed by the broad range of surviving literature, within the wider context of Jewish and Graeco-Roman identity. It uses a number of models from contemporary constructionist views of identity formation to explore how what comes to be seen as 'Christian' literature creates a sense of what to be 'a Christian' means, and traces both continuities and discontinuities with the ways in which Jewish and Graeco-Roman identity were also being constructed through their texts. It seeks to acknowledge the centrality of texts in shaping early Christianity, historically as well as in our perception of it, while also exploring how we might move from those texts to the individuals and communities who preserved them. Such an approach challenges more traditional emphases on the development of institutions, whether structures or credal and ethical formulations, which often fail to recognize the rhetorical function of the texts on which they draw, and the uncertainties of how well these reflect the actual practice and experience of individuals and communities. While building on recent recognition of the diversity of early Christianity, the book goes on to explore the question whether it is possible to speak of a distinctive Christian identity across both the range of early texts and as a pressing historical and theological question in the contemporary world.

The Jesus Story in the Twenty-Seven Books That Changed the World (Hardcover): William Calloley Tremmel The Jesus Story in the Twenty-Seven Books That Changed the World (Hardcover)
William Calloley Tremmel
R1,242 R1,071 Discovery Miles 10 710 Save R171 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The Jesus Story has been told for almost 2000 years, and a good share of the time told differently, depending on who was telling and where and when. This book targets on the earliest telling that occurred from the time of the death of Jesus to the middle of the second century - the twenty-seven books of the New Testament being the primary record we have for the telling of that early story. This book begins with the tellings in the gospels - from Jerusalem to Rome. It then examines the story as the telling shifts from charismatic, free-wheeling preaching to the orderliness of church establishment. Finally there is a report on how the early tellers told of the coming of the end of time.

Almsgiving in the Later Roman Empire - Christian Promotion and Practice 313-450 (Hardcover, New): Richard Finn Almsgiving in the Later Roman Empire - Christian Promotion and Practice 313-450 (Hardcover, New)
Richard Finn
R4,933 Discovery Miles 49 330 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Richard Finn OP examines the significance of almsgiving in Churches of the later empire for the identity and status of the bishops, ascetics, and lay people who undertook practices which differed in kind and context from the almsgiving practised by pagans. It reveals how the almsgiving crucial in constructing the bishop's standing was a co-operative task where honour was shared but which exposed the bishop to criticism and rivalry. Finn details how practices gained meaning from a discourse which recast traditional virtues of generosity and justice to render almsgiving a benefaction and source of honour, and how this pattern of thought and conduct interacted with classical patterns to generate controversy. He argues that co-operation and competition in Christian almsgiving, together with the continued existence of traditional euergetism, meant that, contrary to the views of recent scholars, Christian alms did not turn bishops into the supreme patrons of their cities.

Marcellus of Ancyra and the Lost Years of the Arian Controversy 325-345 (Hardcover): Sara Parvis Marcellus of Ancyra and the Lost Years of the Arian Controversy 325-345 (Hardcover)
Sara Parvis
R4,810 Discovery Miles 48 100 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Is it true, as has often been claimed in recent years, that there was no real controversy in the period immediately following the Council of Nicaea? Sara Parvis, in this lively and meticulous study, argues not. She shows that the two opposing parties which had formed in support of Alexander of Alexandria and Arius in the years before Nicaea continued their activities afterwards, targeting one another with ruthless zeal at a series of synods which may look neutral but are revealed to be demonstrably partisan. Only the deaths of all the original party leaders except Marcellus of Ancyra, and the rise of Athanasius, broke the impasse which followed and allowed new political and theological configurations to form.

Trajectories through the New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers (Hardcover, New): Andrew Gregory, Christopher Tuckett Trajectories through the New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers (Hardcover, New)
Andrew Gregory, Christopher Tuckett
R5,627 Discovery Miles 56 270 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The two-volume work The New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers offers a comparative study of two collections of early Christian texts: the New Testament; and the texts, from immediately after the New Testament period, which are conventionally referred to as the Apostolic Fathers.
The second volume, Trajectories through the New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers, discusses broad theological, literary, and historical issues that arise in the comparative study of these texts, and which are of importance to the study of early Christianity. It deals with the most important current debates concerning both the Apostolic Fathers and the New Testament, such as baptism, Pauline theology, the function of apocalyptic elements, Church order, and Jewish and Christian identity.

Execution and Invention - Death Penalty Discourse in Early Rabbinic and Christian Cultures (Hardcover): Beth A. Berkowitz Execution and Invention - Death Penalty Discourse in Early Rabbinic and Christian Cultures (Hardcover)
Beth A. Berkowitz
R2,560 Discovery Miles 25 600 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The death penalty in classical Judaism has been a highly politicized subject in modern scholarship. Enlightenment attacks on the Talmud's legitimacy led scholars to use the Talmud's criminal law as evidence for its elevated morals. But even more pressing was the need to prove Jews' innocence of the charge of killing Christ. The reconstruction of a just Jewish death penalty was a defense against the accusation that a corrupt Jewish court was responsible for the death of Christ.
In Execution and Invention, Beth A. Berkowitz tells the story of modern scholarship on the ancient rabbinic death penalty and offers a fresh perspective using the approaches of ritual studies, cultural criticism, and talmudic source criticism. Against the scholarly consensus, Berkowitz argues that the early Rabbis used the rabbinic laws of the death penalty to establish their power in the wake of the destruction of the Temple. Following recent currents in historiography, Berkowitz sees the Rabbis as an embattled, almost invisible sect within second-century Judaism. The function of their death penalty laws, Berkowitz contends, was to create a complex ritual of execution under rabbinic control, thus bolstering rabbinic claims to authority in the context of Roman political and cultural domination.
Understanding rabbinic literature to be in dialogue with the Bible, with the variety of ancient Jews, and with Roman imperialism, Berkowitz shows how the Rabbis tried to create an appealing alternative to the Roman, paganized culture of Palestine's Jews. In their death penalty, the Rabbis substituted Rome's power with their own. Early Christians, on the other hand, used death penalty discourse to critique judicialpower. But Berkowitz argues that the Christian critique of execution produced new claims to authority as much as the rabbinic embrace. By comparing rabbinic conversations about the death penalty with Christian ones, Berkowitz reveals death penalty discourse as a significant means of creating authority in second-century western religious cultures. Advancing the death penalty discourse as a discourse of power, Berkowitz sheds light on the central relationship between religious and political authority and the severest form of punishment.

Early Celtic Christianity (Paperback, New edition): Brendan Lehane Early Celtic Christianity (Paperback, New edition)
Brendan Lehane
R599 Discovery Miles 5 990 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This lively and original account of early Celtic Christianity - which was of far greater importance in the development of Western culture than we commonly realize - is told against the background of European history of the first seven centuries A.D. It focuses on the lives of Saints Brendan, Columba, and Columbanus, who lived active and effective lives in the cause of the early Church. Brendan, one of the founding fathers of Christianity in Ireland, was known in legend as a voyager and was thought to have reached the Western Hemisphere long before the Vikings. Columba took Celtic Christianity to Scotland and helped to re-establish it in Wales and in the North and West of England. Columbanus was the great Irish missionary to continental Europe, where he and his followers helped to convert the heathen invaders from the East. When Rome, in the person of St. Augustine, Pope Gregory's apostle to the Angles, penetrated again to England, a showdown between Roman and Celtic Christianity was inevitable. The dramatic confrontation occurred at the Council of Whitby in 664. Rome, with its organization and authority, won, and Celtic Catholicism went into eclipse. But some of its influence persisted all over Europe, and it had a large share in shaping the culture that ultimately emerged from the dark ages. This book's fascination is the picture that it gives of the movements of peoples, the shaping of new countries, and the development of ideas during those too-little-known centuries.

Evangelical Foundations - Religion in England, 1378-1683 (Hardcover): Marvin W. Anderson Evangelical Foundations - Religion in England, 1378-1683 (Hardcover)
Marvin W. Anderson
R1,831 R1,558 Discovery Miles 15 580 Save R273 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Evangelical Foundations surveys renewal in the English Church from Wyclif to Roger Williams. This account explores the biblical roots which Wyclif, the Evangelical Doctor, planted in English soil and the Puritans transplanted in Colonial North America. The purpose is to show how, by use of an English Bible, a national church was renewed through the centrality of preaching. Recent studies by Collinson/Morgan and Hudson/Dent trace the concern of the English religious majority for godly living and learning through the influence of Cambridge and Oxford. Puritan sermons and commentaries, taken from continental models, influenced every level of national life. This vibrant contribution, which extends into the episcopal and parish level, still affects the perceptions of American religion well into the twentieth century. It calls out for recognition in studies such as this which incorporate the dissenting tradition into the moderate stream of English Puritan life and lore.

Gregory of Nyssa and the Concept of Divine Persons (Hardcover, New): Lucian Turcescu Gregory of Nyssa and the Concept of Divine Persons (Hardcover, New)
Lucian Turcescu
R1,829 Discovery Miles 18 290 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The concept of personhood is central to a wide range of contemporary issues, ranging from reproductive rights to the death penalty and euthanasia. We may think that the concept of person is a modern development. In fact, however, this idea does not originate with our discovery of human rights, consciousness, and individuality.
In this study Lucian Turcescu shows that the fourth-century theologian Gregory of Nyssa developed a very sophisticated concept of the person in the context of his attempts to clarify the paradox of the Trinity-a single God comprising three distinct persons. Turcescu offers the first in-depth analysis of Gregory's writings about the divine persons. He shows that Gregory understood personhood as characterized by uniqueness, relationality, and freedom. He reasoned that the three persons of the Trinity have distinctive properties that make them individuals, that is, capable of being enumerated and circumscribed. But this idea of individuation, inherited from the neo-Platonists, falls short of expressing a clear notion of personal uniqueness. By itself it would suggest that a person is merely a collection of properties. Gregory's great contribution was to perceive the importance of relationality to personhood. The three divine persons know and love each other, are in communion with each other, and freely act together in their common will. This understanding, argues Turcescu, adds up to a concept of personal uniqueness much like our modern one.
Turcescu's work not only contributes to our knowledge of the history of Trinitarian theology but can be helpful to theologians who are dealing with issues in contemporary ethics.

The Byzantine Christ - Person, Nature, and Will in the Christology of Saint Maximus the Confessor (Hardcover): Demetrios... The Byzantine Christ - Person, Nature, and Will in the Christology of Saint Maximus the Confessor (Hardcover)
Demetrios Bathrellos
R5,191 Discovery Miles 51 910 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

St Maximus the Confessor is one of the giants of Christian theology. His doctrine of two wills gave the final shape to ancient Christology and was ratified by the Sixth Ecumenical Council in AD 681. This study throws new light upon one of the most interesting periods of historical and systematic theology. Its focus is the seventh century, the century that saw the rapid expansion of Islam, and the Empire's failed attempt to retain many of its south-eastern provinces by inventing and promoting the heresy of Monothelitism (only one will in Christ) as a bridge between the Byzantine Church and the anti-Chalcedonian Churches which prevailed in some of these areas. From the point of view of systematic theology, the book examines the meaning of the terms person/hypostasis, nature/essence, and will in the context of Christology after the Council of Chalcedon (AD 451), with special reference to Maximus. It also explores the complex question of the human will of Jesus Christ and its relation to his person and natures. The Byzantine Christ enhances our understanding of Eastern Orthodox theology and of some of the reasons that still separate it both from Western Christianity and from the so-called Oriental Orthodox Churches.

Cyril of Alexandria and the Nestorian Controversy - The Making of a Saint and of a Heretic (Hardcover, New): Susan Wessel Cyril of Alexandria and the Nestorian Controversy - The Making of a Saint and of a Heretic (Hardcover, New)
Susan Wessel
R5,600 Discovery Miles 56 000 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

What were the historical and cultural processes by which Cyril of Alexandria was elevated to canonical status while his opponent, Nestorius, bishop of Constantinople, was made into a heretic? In contrast to previous scholarship, Susan Wessel concludes that Cyril's success in being elevated to orthodox status was not simply a political accomplishment based on political alliances he had fashioned as opportunity arose. Nor was it a dogmatic victory, based on the clarity and orthodoxy of Cyril's doctrinal claims. Instead, it was his strategy in identifying himself with the orthodoxy of the former bishop of Alexandria, Athanasius, in his victory over Arianism, in borrowing Athanasius' interpretive methods, and in skilfully using the tropes and figures of the second sophistic that made Cyril a saint in the Greek and Coptic Orthodox Churches.

T&T Clark Handbook to Early Christian Meals in the Greco-Roman World (Hardcover): Soham Al-Suadi, Peter-Ben Smit T&T Clark Handbook to Early Christian Meals in the Greco-Roman World (Hardcover)
Soham Al-Suadi, Peter-Ben Smit
R3,584 Discovery Miles 35 840 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This handbook situates early Christian meals in their broader context, with a focus on the core topics that aid understanding of Greco-Roman meal practice, and how this relates to Christian origins. In addition to looking at the broader Hellenistic context, the contributors explain the unique nature of Christian meals, and what they reveal about early Christian communities and the development of Christian identity. Beginning with Hellenistic documents and authors before moving on to the New Testament material itself, according to genre - Gospels, Acts, Letters, Apocalyptic Literature - the handbook culminates with a section on the wider resources that describe daily life in the period, such as medical documents and inscriptions. The literary, historical, theological and philosophical aspects of these resources are also considered, including such aspects as the role of gender during meals; issues of monotheism and polytheism that arise from the structure of the meal; how sacrifice is understood in different meal practices; power dynamics during the meal and issues of inclusion and exclusion at meals.

The Macarian Legacy - The Place of Macarius-Symeon in the Eastern Christian Tradition (Hardcover, New): Marcus Plested The Macarian Legacy - The Place of Macarius-Symeon in the Eastern Christian Tradition (Hardcover, New)
Marcus Plested
R5,455 Discovery Miles 54 550 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The Macarian writings are among the most important and influential works of the early Christian ascetic and mystical tradition. This book offers an introduction to the work of Macarius-Symeon (commonly referred to as Pseudo-Macarius), outlining the lineaments of his teaching and the historical context of his works. The book goes on to examine and re-evaluate the complex question of his relationship with the Messalian tendency and to explore the nature of his theological and spiritual legacy in the later Christian tradition. In so doing the book also offers substantial treatments of the work of Mark the Monk, Diadochus of Photice, Abba Isaiah, and Maximus Confessor. It stands therefore not only as an exploration of the teaching and legacy of Macarius-Symeon but also as a chapter in the history of the Christian spiritual tradition.

The Appropriation of Divine Life in Cyril of Alexandria (Hardcover, New): Daniel A. Keating The Appropriation of Divine Life in Cyril of Alexandria (Hardcover, New)
Daniel A. Keating
R5,585 Discovery Miles 55 850 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Cyril of Alexandria (d.444) was one of the architects of Christian orthodoxy. Daniel A. Keating presents the first comprehensive account of Cyril's narrative of salvation. He offers a corrective to certain readings of Cyril and argues that Cyril presents a balanced picture of our union with Christ. The final chapter compares Cyril with Theodore of Mopsuestia, Augustine, and Leo the Great, in order to examine in brief the relationship between Eastern and Western accounts of salvation.

The Westminster Handbook to Origen (Paperback): John Anthony McGuckin The Westminster Handbook to Origen (Paperback)
John Anthony McGuckin
R908 R699 Discovery Miles 6 990 Save R209 (23%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This book provides ready access into and sure guidance through the marvelous, often convoluted, invariably rich world of Origen: the man, the ecclesiastical dynamics of his day, his extant works, the range of his theological explorations, his influence, and the controversies associated with him in life and in death. Included are recommendations for use and clear presentation of topics which enable the reader, whether novice or specialist, to engage Origen in ways that address the reader's interest.

The Westminster Handbook to Christian Theology series provides a set of resources for the study of historic and contemporary theological movements and Christian theologians. These books are intended to help students and scholars find concise and accurate treatments of important theological terms.

The Making of a Saint - The Life, Times and Sanctification of Neophytos the Recluse (Paperback, Revised): Catia Galatariotou The Making of a Saint - The Life, Times and Sanctification of Neophytos the Recluse (Paperback, Revised)
Catia Galatariotou
R1,107 Discovery Miles 11 070 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Every case of sanctification is unique - as unique as the holy man or woman at its centre. Yet at the same time the problem posed is a general one: how does an individual become a Saint? In this bold and pioneering study the author answers the question by providing a detailed analysis of the case of the late twelfth- and early thirteenth-century Byzantine holy man, the Cypriot Saint Neophytos the Recluse.

Poverty in the Early Church and Today - A Conversation (Hardcover): Steve Walton, Hannah Swithinbank Poverty in the Early Church and Today - A Conversation (Hardcover)
Steve Walton, Hannah Swithinbank
R3,074 Discovery Miles 30 740 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This book is open access and available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. It is funded by Knowledge Unlatched. This innovative volume focuses on the significance of early Christianity for modern means of addressing poverty, by offering a rigorous study of deprivation and its alleviation in both earliest Christianity and today's world. The contributors seek to present the complex ways in which early Christian ideas and practices relate to modern ideas and practices, and vice versa. In this light, the book covers seven major areas of poverty and its causes, benefaction, patronage, donation, wealth and dehumanization, 'the undeserving poor', and responsibility. Each area features an expert in early Christianity in its Jewish and Graeco-Roman settings, paired with an expert in modern strategies for addressing poverty and benefaction; each author engages with the same topic from their respective area of expertise, and responds to their partner's essay. Giving careful attention toboth the continuities and discontinuities between the ancient world and today, the contributors seek to inform and engage church leaders, those working in NGOs concerned with poverty, and all interested in these crucial issues, both Christian and not.

Institutions of the Emerging Church (Paperback): Sven-Olav Back, Erkki Koskenniemi Institutions of the Emerging Church (Paperback)
Sven-Olav Back, Erkki Koskenniemi
R1,107 Discovery Miles 11 070 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The contributors to this volume address the key institutions of the first and second Church, considering the development of rituals and sacraments, and the development of Church leadership, and of the Church itself. The first part of the book looks at the offices of the Church - the Apostolate and the development of other religious authorities - as well as the notion of Apostolic Tradition. The second part looks at the sacraments, with in-depth consideration of the Eucharist, and of Baptismal texts from the early Church. The essays are of interest to scholars researching the development of the early Church and of Church rituals and practices.

Second-Century Christianity, Revised and Expanded - A Collection of Fragments (Paperback, Revised and expanded ed): Robert M.... Second-Century Christianity, Revised and Expanded - A Collection of Fragments (Paperback, Revised and expanded ed)
Robert M. Grant
R618 Discovery Miles 6 180 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This revised and expanded edition of a book that first appeared in 1945 offers an inside look at the growth and spread of Christianity in the second century by providing source materials from pagan witnesses, Christian churches, and movements that became known as heretical. Reading these selections provides a first-hand sense of issues and concerns in that period. It brings the reader right into the arena in which Christianity and Christians were being discussed and provides a first-hand look at what churches were facing as the Christian movement spread. Thirty-nine sections plus a biography are included.

Christianity in the Second Century - The Case of Tatian (Paperback): Emily J. Hunt Christianity in the Second Century - The Case of Tatian (Paperback)
Emily J. Hunt
R1,010 Discovery Miles 10 100 Out of stock


Tatian is a significant figure in the early Church, his work both representing and revealing his second century context. This study offers a detailed exploration of his thought. It is also a valuable introduction to the entire period, particularly the key developments it witnessed in Christianity.
Emily Hunt examines a wide range of topics in depth: Tatian's relationship with Justin Martyr and his Oration to the Greeks; the Apologetic attempt to defend and define Christianity against the Graeco-Roman world, and Christian use of hellenistic philosophy. Tatian was accused of heresy after his death, and this work sees him at the heart of the orthodox/heterodox debate. His links with the East, and his Gospel harmony the Diatessaron, lead to an exploration of Syriac Christianity and asceticism.
In the process, scholarly assumptions about heresiology and the Apologists' relationship with hellenistic philosophy are questioned, and the development of a Christian philosophical tradition is traced from Philo, through Justin Martyr, to Tatian - and then within several key Syriac writers.
This is the first dedicated study of Tatian for more than 40 years.

Maximus the Confessor and his Companions - Documents from Exile (Hardcover): Pauline Allen, Bronwen Neil Maximus the Confessor and his Companions - Documents from Exile (Hardcover)
Pauline Allen, Bronwen Neil
R4,398 Discovery Miles 43 980 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Maximus the Confessor and his Companions provides the first English translations of seven documents from the seventh century which recount the legal trials, banishment, and deaths of the monk Maximus the Confessor, his disciples and friends, and Pope Martin I. The background to these documents is formed by Byzantine imperial religious policy, radical change in the Byzantine empire, Arab and Persian attacks, and the close ties which existed between Maximus and his followers and the West.

Augustine's Commentary on Galatians - Introduction, Text, Translation, and Notes (Hardcover): Eric Plumer Augustine's Commentary on Galatians - Introduction, Text, Translation, and Notes (Hardcover)
Eric Plumer
R4,799 Discovery Miles 47 990 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Now available in English for the first time, Augustine's Commentary on Galatians is his only complete, formal commentary on any book of the Bible and offers unique insights into his understanding of Paul and of his own task as a biblical interpreter. In addition to an English translation with facing Latin text, Eric Plumer provides a comprehensive introduction and copious notes.

The World That Shaped the New Testament, Revised Edition (Paperback, 2nd Revised edition): Calvin J. Roetzel The World That Shaped the New Testament, Revised Edition (Paperback, 2nd Revised edition)
Calvin J. Roetzel
R681 R532 Discovery Miles 5 320 Save R149 (22%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In this book, Calvin Roetzel explores the social, political, religious, and intellectual environment of the New Testament writers. Roetzel maps the major features of the first-century landscape so that the student may be able to view the whole, and through the whole gain new perspective on and insight into each part. Now updated with the most current scholarship and with revisions taking into account archeological findings, this is the best available introduction to the subject.

Expanded materials include discussion of the social structure of Roman society, political dimensions of Pharisaism, Hellenistic religious expression, the Jewish Diaspora, the influence of the Septuagint on the Gospel writers and Paul, and women in antiquity. Pictures are integrated into the text at relevant points, the end of each chapter contains suggestions for further reading, and there is also a current and comprehensive bibliography of topics and authors.

The Artificiality of Christianity - Essays on the Poetics of Monasticism (Hardcover): M.B. Pranger The Artificiality of Christianity - Essays on the Poetics of Monasticism (Hardcover)
M.B. Pranger
R1,897 Discovery Miles 18 970 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The writings of Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109) reveal how the monastic mind, oscillating between hope and despair, was absorbed in technical exercises rather than in religious emotions. Early on monasticism had developed procedures for " ruminating on" the Bible and the works of the Church Fathers. Applying the art of logic to this theme, Anselm offers a denser version of monastic meditation that constitutes a poetics of monastic literature.
Before engaging Anselm' s works, this book addresses texts-- by Gregory the Great, Bernard of Clairvaux, Rupert of Deutz, and Richard of St. Victor-- based on the same principles. In them, the potentially violent nature of an existence in which time has almost come to a halt manifests itself in a vision of the act of reading as a struggle with the text and as violent, amorous passion. The book then traces the decline of the monastic poetical principle in the writings of John of the Cross, Pierre de Be rulle, Calvin, and Ignatius of Loyola.
A concluding chapter on Ignatius and James Joyce shows how the poetics of monasticism both survives and is exiled in modernist literature.

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