0
Your cart

Your cart is empty

Browse All departments
Price
  • R50 - R100 (17)
  • R100 - R250 (647)
  • R250 - R500 (2,128)
  • R500+ (3,045)
  • -
Status
Format
Author / Contributor
Publisher

Books > History > European history > From 1900

The Crime And The Silence - A Quest For The Truth Of A Wartime Massacre (Paperback): Anna Bikont The Crime And The Silence - A Quest For The Truth Of A Wartime Massacre (Paperback)
Anna Bikont 1
R256 R194 Discovery Miles 1 940 Save R62 (24%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Winner of the European Book Prize.

On 10 July 1941 a horrifying crime was committed in the small Polish town of Jedwadbne. Early in the afternoon, the town's Jewish population - hundreds of men, women and children - were ordered out of their homes, and marched into the town square. By the end of the day most would be dead. It was a massacre on a shocking scale, and one that was widely condemned. But only a few people were brought to justice for their part in the atrocity. The truth of what actually happened on that day was to be suppressed for more than sixty years.

Part history, part memoir, part investigation, The Crime And The Silence is an award-winning journalist's account of the events of that day: both the story of a massacre told through oral histories of survivors and witnesses, and a portrait of a Polish town coming to terms with its dark past.

Letters Of Stone - Discovering A Family's History In Nazi Germany (Paperback): Steven Robins Letters Of Stone - Discovering A Family's History In Nazi Germany (Paperback)
Steven Robins 3
R260 R205 Discovery Miles 2 050 Save R55 (21%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

As a young boy growing up in Port Elizabeth in the 1960s and 1970s, Steven Robins was haunted by an old postcard-size photograph of three unknown women on a table in the dining room. Only later did he learn that the women were his father’s mother and sisters, photographed in Berlin in 1937, before they were killed in the Holocaust. Steven’s father, who had fled Nazi Germany before it was too late, never spoke about the fate of his family who remained there. Steven became obsessed with finding out what happened to the women, but had little to go on. In time he stumbled on bare facts in museums in Washington DC and Berlin, and later he discovered over a hundred letters sent to his father and uncle from the family in Berlin between 1936 and 1943. The women who before had been unnamed faces in a photograph could now tell their story to future generations.

Letters of Stone tracks Steven’s journey of discovery about the lives and fates of the Robinski family. It is also a book about geographical journeys: to the Karoo town of Williston, where his father’s uncle settled in the late nineteenth century and became mayor; to Berlin, where Steven laid ‘stumbling stones’ (Stolpersteine) in commemoration of his family and other Jewish victims of the Holocaust; to Auschwitz, where his father’s siblings perished.

Most of all, this book is a poignant reconstruction of a family trapped in an increasingly terrifying and deadly Nazi state, and of the immense pressure on Steven’s father in faraway South Africa, which forced him to retreat into silence.

50 Children - One Ordinary American Couple's Extraordinary Rescue Mission Into the Heart of Nazi Germany (Paperback):... 50 Children - One Ordinary American Couple's Extraordinary Rescue Mission Into the Heart of Nazi Germany (Paperback)
Steven Pressman
R304 R284 Discovery Miles 2 840 Save R20 (7%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Two ordinary Americans. Fifty innocent lives. One unforgettable journey.

In early 1939, few Americans were thinking about the darkening storm clouds over Europe. Nor did they have much sympathy for the growing number of Jewish families who were increasingly threatened and brutalized by Adolf Hitler's policies in Germany and Austria.

But one ordinary American couple decided that something had to be done. Despite overwhelming obstacles—both in Europe and in the United States—Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus made a bold and unprecedented decision to travel into Nazi Germany in an effort to save a group of Jewish children.

This is their story.

The High Nest (Hardcover): Roxane van Iperen The High Nest (Hardcover)
Roxane van Iperen 1
R446 R357 Discovery Miles 3 570 Save R89 (20%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

During the Second World War two Jewish sisters - Janny and Lien Brilleslijper - run one of the largest hideaways in The Netherlands: The High Nest, a villa in The Gooi area. While the last remaining Jews are being hunted in The Netherlands, the lives of dozens of hideaways kept going for better or for worse, right under the noses of their National Socialist neighbours. Eventually, the nest is exposed and the Brilleslijper family put on one of the last transports to Auschwitz, along with the (Anne) Frank family. Roxane's novelistic eye combined with her rigorous research result in a hugely compelling portrayal of courage, treason and human resilience. THE HIGH NEST is a truly unforgettable book. After Roxane and her family moved into The High Nest in 2012 she spent six years writing and piecing together its story. Fundamental elements of Roxane's research into The High Nest are the personal, unpublished memoirs Janny Brilleslijper wrote for their close friends and family members. Roxane gained access to historic interviews with Janny, Lien, Eberhard and others, as well as many personal conversations with Janny and Lien's children. The book will contain many photographs from the Brilleslijper family archive.

Renia's Diary - A Girl's Life in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Hardcover): Renia Spiegel Renia's Diary - A Girl's Life in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Hardcover)
Renia Spiegel 1
R406 R335 Discovery Miles 3 350 Save R71 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Introduction by Deborah Lipstadt, author of Denial July 15, 1942, Wednesday Remember this day; remember it well. You will tell generations to come. Since 8 o'clock today we have been shut away in the ghetto. I live here now. The world is separated from me and I'm separated from the world. Renia is a young girl who dreams of becoming a poet. But Renia is Jewish, she lives in Poland and the year is 1939. When Russia and Germany invade her country, Renia's world shatters. Separated from her mother, her life takes on a new urgency as she flees Przemysl to escape night bombing raids, observes the disappearances of other Jewish families and, finally, witnesses the creation of the ghetto. But alongside the terror of war, there is also great beauty, as she begins to find her voice as a writer and falls in love for the first time. She and the boy she falls in love with, Zygmunt, share their first kiss a few hours before the Nazis reach her hometown. And it is Zygmunt who writes the final, heartbreaking entry in Renia's diary. Recently rediscovered after seventy years, Renia's Diary is already being described as a classic of Holocaust literature. Written with a clarity and skill that is reminiscent of Anne Frank, it is an extraordinary testament to both the horrors of war, and to the life that can exist even in the darkest times.

The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz - The Sunday Times Bestseller (Paperback): Jeremy Dronfield The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz - The Sunday Times Bestseller (Paperback)
Jeremy Dronfield 2
R195 R154 Discovery Miles 1 540 Save R41 (21%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

Pre-order the inspiring true story of a father and son's fight to stay together and survive the Holocaust, for anyone captivated by The Choice and The Tattooist of Auschwitz. 'An emotionally devastating story of courage - and survival' i Paper 'Extraordinary' Observer _______ Where there is family, there is hope . . . Vienna, 1930s. The Kleinmann family live a simple, ordinary life. Gustav works as a furniture upholsterer while Tini keeps their modest apartment. Their greatest joy is their children: Fritz, Edith, Herta and Kurt. But after the Nazis annex Austria, the Kleinmanns' world rapidly shifts before their eyes. Neighbours turn on them, the business is seized, as the threat to the family becomes ever greater. Gustav and Fritz are among the first to be taken. Nazi police send the pair to Buchenwald in Germany, the beginning of an unimaginable ordeal. Over the months of suffering that follow, there is one constant that keeps them alive: the love between father and son. Then, they discover that Gustav will be transferred to Auschwitz, a certain death sentence, and Fritz is faced with a choice: let his father to die alone, or join him... Based on Gustav's secret diary and meticulous archival research, this book tells the Kleinemanns' story for the first time - a story of love and courage in the face of unparalleled horrors. The Boy Who Followed His Father Into Auschwitz is a reminder of the worst and the best of humanity, of the strength of family ties and the human spirit.

Renia's Diary - A Girl's Life in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Paperback): Renia Spiegel Renia's Diary - A Girl's Life in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Paperback)
Renia Spiegel 1
R320 R252 Discovery Miles 2 520 Save R68 (21%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

Introduction by Deborah Lipstadt, author of Denial

July 15, 1942, Wednesday

Remember this day; remember it well. You will tell generations to come. Since 8 o’clock today we have been shut away in the ghetto. I live here now. The world is separated from me and I’m separated from the world.

Renia is a young girl who dreams of becoming a poet. But Renia is Jewish, she lives in Poland and the year is 1939. When Russia and Germany invade her country, Renia's world shatters. Separated from her mother, her life takes on a new urgency as she flees Przemysl to escape night bombing raids, observes the disappearances of other Jewish families and, finally, witnesses the creation of the ghetto.

But alongside the terror of war, there is also great beauty, as she begins to find her voice as a writer and falls in love for the first time. She and the boy she falls in love with, Zygmunt, share their first kiss a few hours before the Nazis reach her hometown. And it is Zygmunt who writes the final, heartbreaking entry in Renia’s diary.

Recently rediscovered after seventy years, Renia’s Diary is already being described as a classic of Holocaust literature. Written with a clarity and skill that is reminiscent of Anne Frank, it is an extraordinary testament to both the horrors of war, and to the life that can exist even in the darkest times.

The Children's Block - Based on a True Story by an Auschwitz Survivor (Paperback): Otto B Kraus The Children's Block - Based on a True Story by an Auschwitz Survivor (Paperback)
Otto B Kraus 1
R175 R138 Discovery Miles 1 380 Save R37 (21%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

'We lived on a bunk built for four but in times of overcrowding, it slept seven and at times even eight. There was so little space on the berth that when one of us wanted to ease his hip, we all had to turn in a tangle of legs and chests and hollow bellies as if we were one many-limbed creature, a Hindu god or a centipede. We grow intimate not only in body but also in mind because we knew that though we were not born of one womb, we would certainly die together.'

Alex Ehren is poet, a prisoner and a teacher in block 31 in Auschwitz-Birkenau, the children’s block. He spends his days trying to survive while illegally giving lessons to his young charges while shielding them as best he can from the impossible horrors of the camp. But trying to teach the children is not the only illicit activity that Alex is in

volved in. Alex is keeping a diary…

Originally published as THE PAINTED WALL, Otto Kraus’s autobiographical novel, tells the true story of 500 Jewish children who lived in the Czech Family Camp in Auschwitz-Birkenau between September 1943 and June 1944.

The High Nest (Paperback): Roxane van Iperen The High Nest (Paperback)
Roxane van Iperen 1
R352 R292 Discovery Miles 2 920 Save R60 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
The Tattooist Of Auschwitz (Paperback, Young Adult Edition): Heather Morris The Tattooist Of Auschwitz (Paperback, Young Adult Edition)
Heather Morris 1
R193 R159 Discovery Miles 1 590 Save R34 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

For readers of Schindler's List, The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz and The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas comes a heart-breaking story of the very best of humanity in the very worst of circumstances.

In 1942, Lale Sokolov arrived in Auschwitz-Birkenau. He was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival - scratching numbers into his fellow victims' arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust. Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale - a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer - it was love at first sight. And he was determined not only to survive himself, but to ensure this woman, Gita, did, too.

So begins one of the most life-affirming, courageous, unforgettable and human stories of the Holocaust: the true love story of the tattooist of Auschwitz.

Bitter Reckoning - Israel Tries Holocaust Survivors as Nazi Collaborators (Hardcover): Dan Porat Bitter Reckoning - Israel Tries Holocaust Survivors as Nazi Collaborators (Hardcover)
Dan Porat
R589 R465 Discovery Miles 4 650 Save R124 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Beginning in 1950, the state of Israel prosecuted and jailed dozens of Holocaust survivors who had served as camp kapos or ghetto police under the Nazis. At last comes the first full account of the kapo trials, based on records newly declassified after forty years. In December 1945, a Polish-born commuter on a Tel Aviv bus recognized a fellow rider as the former head of a town council the Nazis had established to manage the Jews. When he denounced the man as a collaborator, the rider leapt off the bus, pursued by passengers intent on beating him to death. Five years later, to address ongoing tensions within Holocaust survivor communities, the State of Israel instituted the criminal prosecution of Jews who had served as ghetto administrators or kapos in concentration camps. Dan Porat brings to light more than three dozen little-known trials, held over the following two decades, of survivors charged with Nazi collaboration. Scouring police investigation files and trial records, he found accounts of Jewish policemen and camp functionaries who harassed, beat, robbed, and even murdered their brethren. But as the trials exposed the tragic experiences of the kapos, over time the courts and the public shifted from seeing them as evil collaborators to victims themselves, and the fervor to prosecute them abated. Porat shows how these trials changed Israel's understanding of the Holocaust and explores how the suppression of the trial records-long classified by the state-affected history and memory. Sensitive to the devastating options confronting those who chose to collaborate, yet rigorous in its analysis, Bitter Reckoning invites us to rethink our ideas of complicity and justice and to consider what it means to be a victim in extraordinary circumstances.

The Choice (Paperback): Edith Eger The Choice (Paperback)
Edith Eger 1
R195 R154 Discovery Miles 1 540 Save R41 (21%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

THE AWARDWINNING INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

'One of those rare and eternal stories you don't want to end and that leave you forever changed' - Desmond Tutu

'A masterpiece of holocaust literature. Her memoir, like her life, is extraordinary, harrowing and inspiring in equal measure' – The Times Literary Supplement

'Little dancer', Mengele says, ‘dance for me’

In 1944, sixteen-year-old ballerina Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.

The horrors of the Holocaust didn't break Edith. In fact, they helped her learn to live again with a life-affirming strength and a truly remarkable resilience.

The Choice is her unforgettable story. It shows that hope can flower in the most unlikely places.

The Diary of a Young Girl - The Definitive Edition (Paperback): Anne Frank The Diary of a Young Girl - The Definitive Edition (Paperback)
Anne Frank; Edited by Otto Frank, Mirjam Pressler; Translated by Susan Massotty; Introduction by Elie Wiesel 1
R221 R146 Discovery Miles 1 460 Save R75 (34%) In stock

Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl is an inspiring and tragic account of an ordinary life lived in extraordinary circumstances that has enthralled readers for generations. This Penguin Classics edition is edited by Otto H. Frank and Mirjam Pressler, translated by Susan Massotty, and includes an introduction by Elie Wiesel, author of Night. 'June, 1942: I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope you will be a great source of comfort and support.' In Amsterdam, in the summer of 1942, the Nazis forced teenager Anne Frank and her family into hiding. For over two years, they, another family and a German dentist lived in a 'secret annexe', fearing discovery. All that time, Anne kept a diary. Since its publication in 1947, Anne Frank's diary has been read by tens of millions of people. This Definitive Edition restores substantial material omitted from the original edition, giving us a deeper insight into Anne Frank's world. Her curiosity about her emerging sexuality, the conflicts with her mother, her passion for Peter, a boy whose family hid with hers, and her acute portraits of her fellow prisoners reveal Anne as more human, more vulnerable and more vital than ever. 'One of the greatest books of the twentieth century' Guardian 'A modern classic' Julia Neuberger, The Times

Elli - Coming of Age in the Holocaust (Paperback): Livia E. Bitton Jackson Elli - Coming of Age in the Holocaust (Paperback)
Livia E. Bitton Jackson
R183 R133 Discovery Miles 1 330 Save R50 (27%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days
Learning from the Germans - Confronting Race and the Memory of Evil (Hardcover): Susan Neiman Learning from the Germans - Confronting Race and the Memory of Evil (Hardcover)
Susan Neiman 1
R430 R332 Discovery Miles 3 320 Save R98 (23%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

As the western world struggles with its legacies of racism and colonialism, what can we learn from the past in order to move forward? Susan Neiman's Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. Neiman, who grew up as a white girl in the American South during the civil rights movement, is a Jewish woman who has spent much of her adult life in Berlin. In clear and gripping prose, she uses this unique perspective to combine philosophical reflection, personal history and conversations with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories. Through focusing on the particularities of those histories, she provides examples for other nations, whether they are facing resurgent nationalism, ongoing debates over reparations or controversies surrounding historical monuments and the contested memories they evoke. It is necessary reading for all those confronting their own troubled pasts.

The Complete MAUS (Paperback): Art Spiegelman The Complete MAUS (Paperback)
Art Spiegelman 1
R365 R286 Discovery Miles 2 860 Save R79 (22%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

Combined for the first time here are Maus I: A Survivor's Tale and Maus II - the complete story of Vladek Spiegelman and his wife, living and surviving in Hitler's Europe. By addressing the horror of the Holocaust through cartoons, the author captures the everyday reality of fear and is able to explore the guilt, relief and extraordinary sensation of survival - and how the children of survivors are in their own way affected by the trials of their parents. A contemporary classic of immeasurable significance. 

Non-Germans Under the Third Reich - The Nazi Judicial and Administrative System in Germany and Occupied Eastern Europe, with... Non-Germans Under the Third Reich - The Nazi Judicial and Administrative System in Germany and Occupied Eastern Europe, with Special Regard to Occupied Poland, 1939-1945 (Paperback)
Diemut Majer; Translated by Peter Thomas Hill, Edward Vance Humphrey, Brian Levin
R953 R753 Discovery Miles 7 530 Save R200 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Under the legal and administrative system of Nazi Germany, people categorized as Fremdvolkische (literally, "foreign people") were subject to special laws that restricted their rights, limited their protection under the law, and exposed them to extraordinary legal sanctions and brutal, extralegal police actions. These special laws, one of the central constitutional principles of the Third Reich, applied to anyone perceived as different or racially inferior, whether German citizens or not.
""Non-Germans" under the Third Reich" traces the establishment and evolution of these laws from the beginnings of the Third Reich through the administration of annexed and occupied eastern territories during the war. Drawing extensively on German archival sources as well as on previously unexplored material from Poland and elsewhere in eastern Europe, the book shows with chilling detail how the National Socialist government maintained a superficial legal continuity with the Weimar Republic while expanding the legal definition of Fremdvolkische, to untimately give itself legal sanction for the actions undertaken in the Holocaust. Replete with revealing quotations from secret decrees, instructions, orders, and reports, this major work of scholarship offers a sobering assessment of the theory and practice of law in Nazi Germany.
Published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Eavesdropping on Hell - Historical Guide to Western Communications Intelligence and the Holocaust, 1939-1945 (Paperback, 2nd... Eavesdropping on Hell - Historical Guide to Western Communications Intelligence and the Holocaust, 1939-1945 (Paperback, 2nd edition)
Robert J. Hanyok
R297 R245 Discovery Miles 2 450 Save R52 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

This recent government publication investigates an area often overlooked by historians: the impact of the Holocaust on the Western powers' intelligence-gathering community. A guide for researchers rather than a narrative study, it explains the archival organization of wartime records accumulated by the U.S. Army's Signal Intelligence Service and Britain's Government Code and Cypher School. In addition, it summarizes Holocaust-related information intercepted during the war years and deals at length with the fascinating question of how information about the Holocaust first reached the West.
The guide begins with brief summaries of the history of anti-Semitism in the West and early Nazi policies in Germany. An overview of the Allies' system of gathering communications intelligence follows, along with a list of American and British sources of cryptologic records. A concise review of communications intelligence notes items of particular relevance to the Holocaust's historical narrative, and the book concludes with observations on cryptology and the Holocaust. Numerous photographs illuminate the text.

The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz - The Sunday Times Bestseller (Paperback): Jeremy Dronfield The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz - The Sunday Times Bestseller (Paperback)
Jeremy Dronfield 1
R320 R252 Discovery Miles 2 520 Save R68 (21%) Shipped within 4 - 8 working days

The inspiring, true story of a father and son's fight to stay together and to survive the Holocaust. In 1939, Gustav Kleinmann, a Jewish upholsterer in Vienna, was seized by the Nazis. Along with his teenage son Fritz, he was sent to Buchenwald in Germany. There began an unimaginable ordeal that saw the pair beaten, starved and forced to build the very concentration camp they were held in. When Gustav was set to be transferred to Auschwitz, a certain death sentence, Fritz refused to leave his side. Throughout the horrors they witnessed and the suffering they endured, there was one constant that kept them alive: the love between father and son. Based on Gustav's secret diary and meticulous archive research, this book tells his and Fritz's story for the first time - a story of courage and survival unparalleled in the history of the Holocaust.

The Lost - A Search for Six of Six Million (Paperback): Daniel Mendelsohn The Lost - A Search for Six of Six Million (Paperback)
Daniel Mendelsohn 2
R313 R228 Discovery Miles 2 280 Save R85 (27%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

A writer's search for his family's tragic past in World War II becomes a remarkably original and riveting epic, brilliantly exploring the nature of time and memory. `The Lost' begins as the story of a boy who grew up in a family haunted by the disappearance of six relatives during the Holocaust - an unmentionable subject that gripped his imagination from earliest childhood. Decades later, spurred by the discovery of a cache of desperate letters written to his grandfather in 1939, Daniel Mendelsohn sets out to find the remaining eyewitnesses to his relative's fates. The quest takes him to a dozen countries and forces him to confront the wrenching discrepancies between the histories we live and the stories we tell. Finally, he goes back to the small Ukrainian town where his family's story began, and where the solution to a decades-old mystery awaits him. Deftly moving between past and present, interweaving a world-wandering odyssey with memories of a vanished generation, `The Lost' transforms the story of one family into a profound and morally searching study of our fragile hold on the past. Deeply personal, grippingly suspenseful and beautifully written, this literary tour de force illuminates all that is lost, and found, in the passage of time.

Breaking the Silence (Paperback, New edition): Walter Laqueur, Richard Breitman Breaking the Silence (Paperback, New edition)
Walter Laqueur, Richard Breitman
R697 Discovery Miles 6 970 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Through unparalleled historical detective work, noted scholars Walter Laqueur and Richard Breitman reveal the inspiring tale of Eduard Schulte, the Breslau business leader who risked his life to gather information about such Nazi activities as the revised date of the German attack on Poland and the Nazi plan for mass extermination of European Jews. First published in 1986, Breaking the Silence is reissued with both a new foreword and afterword by the authors.

Knights Cross Holders of the Ss and the German Police Active and Reserve Waffen-Ss and Police Recipients, 1940-1945... Knights Cross Holders of the Ss and the German Police Active and Reserve Waffen-Ss and Police Recipients, 1940-1945 (Hardcover)
March Rikmenspoel
R822 R761 Discovery Miles 7 610 Save R61 (7%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The only complete listing in existence of all the Knight Cross holders of the Waffen SS. Includes all ranks and all persons whether they started their careers or finished them in the Waffen SS. The first volume includes all persons who received the decoration while serving in the Waffen SS. The second describes all who received the decoration while attached to a unit in the Waffen SS or in the police units. Includes photos of all persons and documents and full biographies of all receivers.

Modernity and the Holocaust (Paperback, New Ed): Zygmunt Bauman Modernity and the Holocaust (Paperback, New Ed)
Zygmunt Bauman
R400 Discovery Miles 4 000 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Sociology is concerned with modern society, but has never come to terms with one of the most distinctive and horrific aspects of modernity - the Holocaust.

The book examines what sociology can teach us about the Holocaust, but more particularly concentrates upon the lessons which the Holocaust has for sociology. Bauman's work demonstrates that the Holocaust has to be understood as deeply involved with the nature of modernity. There is nothing comparable to this work available in the sociological literature.

The Cut Out Girl - A Story of War and Family, Lost and Found: The Costa Book of the Year 2018 (Paperback): Bart van Es The Cut Out Girl - A Story of War and Family, Lost and Found: The Costa Book of the Year 2018 (Paperback)
Bart van Es 1
R270 R165 Discovery Miles 1 650 Save R105 (39%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

*** WINNER OF THE COSTA BOOK OF THE YEAR 2018 *** ***WINNER OF THE SLIGHTLY FOXED BEST FIRST BIOGRAPHY PRIZE 2018*** 'A masterpiece of history and memoir' Evening Standard 'Superb. This is a necessary book - painful, harrowing, tragic, but also uplifting' The Times Little Lien wasn't taken from her Jewish parents in the Hague - she was given away in the hope that she might be saved. Hidden and raised by a foster family in the provinces during the Nazi occupation, she survived the war only to find that her real parents had not. Much later, she fell out with her foster family, and Bart van Es - the grandson of Lien's foster parents - knew he needed to find out why. His account of tracing Lien and telling her story is a searing exploration of two lives and two families. It is a story about love and misunderstanding and about the ways that our most painful experiences - so crucial in defining us - can also be redefined. 'Luminous, elegant, haunting - I read it straight through' Philippe Sands, author of East West Street 'Deeply moving. Writes with an almost Sebaldian simplicity and understatement' Guardian

We Wept Without Tears - Testimonies of the Jewish Sonderkommando from Auschwitz (Paperback): Gideon Greif We Wept Without Tears - Testimonies of the Jewish Sonderkommando from Auschwitz (Paperback)
Gideon Greif
R573 Discovery Miles 5 730 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The Sonderkommando of Auschwitz-Birkenau consisted primarily of Jewish prisoners forced by the Germans to facilitate the mass extermination. Though never involved in the killing itself, they were compelled to be "members of staff" of the Nazi death-factory. This book, translated for the first time into English from its original Hebrew, consists of interviews with the very few surviving men who witnessed at first hand the unparalleled horror of the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp. Some of these men had never spoken of their experiences before. Over a period of years, Gideon Greif interviewed intensively all Sonderkommando survivors living in Israel. They describe not only the details of the German-Nazi killing program but also the moral and human challenges they faced. The book provides direct testimony about the "Final Solution of the Jewish Problem," but it is also a unique document on the boundless cruelty and deceit practiced by the Germans. It documents the helplessness and powerlessness of the one-and-a-half million people, 90 percent of them Jews, who were brutally murdered in the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Free Delivery
Pinterest Twitter Facebook Google+
You may like...
Promise Me You'll Shoot Yourself - The…
Florian Huber Hardcover  (1)
R532 R321 Discovery Miles 3 210
American Dreams and Nazi Nightmares
Kirsten Fermaglich Paperback R656 Discovery Miles 6 560
Kristallnacht - Prelude to Destruction
Martin Gilbert Paperback R325 R301 Discovery Miles 3 010
Man's Search for Meaning
Viktor E. Frankl Paperback  (1)
R175 R138 Discovery Miles 1 380
Zvi - The Miraculous Story of Triumph…
Elwood McQuaid Paperback R269 R224 Discovery Miles 2 240
Himmler's Jewish Tailor - The Story of…
Mark Lewisohn Hardcover R669 R519 Discovery Miles 5 190
Finding Maria - A Young Man's Search for…
Peter Szabo Paperback R229 R186 Discovery Miles 1 860
The Volunteer - The True Story Of The…
Jack Fairweather Paperback  (1)
R320 R252 Discovery Miles 2 520
Sons and Soldiers - The Jews Who Escaped…
Bruce Henderson Paperback  (2)
R241 R177 Discovery Miles 1 770
Anne Frank Remembered - The Story of the…
Miep Gies Paperback  (1)
R234 R153 Discovery Miles 1 530

 

Partners