0
Your cart

Your cart is empty

Browse All departments
Price
  • R0 - R50 (1)
  • R50 - R100 (3)
  • R100 - R250 (5,552)
  • R250 - R500 (71,699)
  • R500+ (26,383)
  • -
Status
Format
Author / Contributor
Publisher

Books > Law > Jurisprudence & general issues > Legal history

The Great Demarcation - The French Revolution and the Invention of Modern Property (Paperback): Rafe Blaufarb The Great Demarcation - The French Revolution and the Invention of Modern Property (Paperback)
Rafe Blaufarb
R467 Discovery Miles 4 670 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

What does it mean to own something? What sorts of things can be owned, and what cannot? How does one relinquish ownership? What are the boundaries between private and public property? Over the course of a decade, the French Revolution grappled with these questions. Punctuated by false starts, contingencies, and unexpected results, this process laid the foundations of the Napoleonic Code and modern notions of property. As Rafe Blaufarb demonstrates in this ambitious work, the French Revolution remade the system of property-holding that had existed in France before 1789. The revolutionary changes aimed at two fundamental goals: the removal of formal public power from the sphere of property and the excision of property from the realm of sovereignty. The revolutionaries accomplished these two aims by abolishing privately-owned forms of power, such as jurisdictional lordship and venal public office, and by dismantling the Crown domain, thus making the state purely sovereign. This brought about a Great Demarcation: a radical distinction between property and power from which flowed the critical distinctions between the political and the social, state and society, sovereignty and ownership, the public and private. It destroyed the conceptual basis of the Old Regime, laid the foundation of France's new constitutional order, and crystallized modern ways of thinking about polities and societies. By tracing how the French Revolution created a new legal and institutional reality, The Great Demarcation shows how the revolutionary transformation of Old Regime property helped inaugurate political modernity

Criminal Law and the Man Problem (Hardcover): Ngaire Naffine Criminal Law and the Man Problem (Hardcover)
Ngaire Naffine
R1,275 Discovery Miles 12 750 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Men have always dominated the most basic precepts of the criminal legal world - its norms, its priorities and its character. Men have been the regulators and the regulated: the main subjects and objects of criminal law and by far the more dangerous sex. And yet men, as men, are still hardly talked about as the determining force within criminal law or in its exegesis. This book brings men into sharp focus, as the pervasively powerful interest group, whose wants and preoccupations have shaped the discipline. This constitutes the `man problem' of criminal law. This new analysis probes the unacknowledged thinking of generations of influential legal men, which includes the psychological and legal techniques that have obscured the operation of bias, even to the legal experts themselves. It explains how men's interests have influenced the most cherished legal norms, especially the rules of human contact, which were designed to protect men from other men, while specifically securing lawful sexual access to at least one woman. The aim is to test the discipline's broadest commitments to civility, and its trajectory towards the final resolution, when men and women were declared to be equal and equivalent legal persons. In the process it exposes the morally and intellectually limiting consequences of male power.

The Right to Dress - Sumptuary Laws in a Global Perspective, c.1200-1800 (Hardcover): Giorgio Riello, Ulinka Rublack The Right to Dress - Sumptuary Laws in a Global Perspective, c.1200-1800 (Hardcover)
Giorgio Riello, Ulinka Rublack
R2,182 R2,044 Discovery Miles 20 440 Save R138 (6%) Shipped within 8 - 13 working days

This is the first global history of dress regulation and its place in broader debates around how human life and societies should be visualised and materialised. Sumptuary laws were a tool on the part of states to regulate not only manufacturing systems and moral economies via the medium of expenditure and consumption of clothing but also banquets, festivities and funerals. Leading scholars on Asian, Latin American, Ottoman and European history shed new light on how and why items of dress became key aspirational goods across society, how they were lobbied for and marketed, and whether or not sumptuary laws were implemented by cities, states and empires to restrict or channel trade and consumption. Their findings reveal the significance of sumptuary laws in medieval and early modern societies as a site of contestation between individuals and states and how dress as an expression of identity developed as a modern 'human right'.

'Why is your axe bloody?' - A Reading of Njals Saga (Paperback): William Ian Miller 'Why is your axe bloody?' - A Reading of Njals Saga (Paperback)
William Ian Miller
R606 Discovery Miles 6 060 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Nijals saga the greatest of the sagas of the Icelanders, was written around 1280. It tells the story of a complex feud, that starts innocently enough in a tiff over seating arrangement at a local feast, and expands over the course of 20 years to engulf half the country, in which both sides are effectively exterminated, Njal and his family burned to death in their farmhouse, the other faction picked off over the entire course of the feud. Law and feud feature centrally in the saga, Njal, its hero, being the greatest lawyer of his generation. No reading of the saga can do it justice unless it takes its law, its feuding strategies, as well as the author's stunning manipulation and saga conventions. In 'Why is your axe bloody' W.I. Miller offers a lively, entertaining, and completely oriignal personal reading of this lengthy saga.

A History of the Hungarian Constitution - Law, Government and Political Culture in Central Europe (Hardcover): Ferenc Horcher,... A History of the Hungarian Constitution - Law, Government and Political Culture in Central Europe (Hardcover)
Ferenc Horcher, Thomas Lorman
R1,946 Discovery Miles 19 460 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The new Hungarian Basic Law, which was ratified on 1 January 2012, provoked domestic and international controversy. Of particular concern was the constitutional text's explicit claim that it was situated within a reinvigorated Hungarian legal tradition that had allegedly developed over centuries before its violent interruption during World War II, by German invaders, and later, by Soviet occupation. To explore the context and validity of this claim, and the legal traditions which have informed the stormy centuries of Hungary's constitutional development, this book brings together a group of leading historians, political scientists and legal scholars to produce a comprehensive history of Hungarian constitutional thought. Ranging in scope from an overview of Hungarian medieval jurisprudence to an assessment of the various criticisms levelled at the new Hungarian Basis Law of 2012, contributors assess the constitutions, their impacts and their legacies, as well as the social and cultural contexts within which they were drafted. The historical analysis is accompanied by a selection of original source materials, many translated here for the first time. This is the only book in English on the subject and is essential reading for all those interested in Hungary's history, political culture and constitution.

International Investment Law and History (Hardcover): Stephan W. Schill, Christian J. Tams, Rainer Hofmann International Investment Law and History (Hardcover)
Stephan W. Schill, Christian J. Tams, Rainer Hofmann
R2,667 Discovery Miles 26 670 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Historiographical approaches in international investment law scholarship are becoming ever more important. This insightful book combines perspectives from a range of expert international law scholars who explore ways in which using a broad variety of methods in historical research can lead to a better understanding of international investment law. International Investment Law and History critically evaluates the use of historical analysis in international investment law. It examines the various roles that historical arguments play in interpreting investment treaties, resolving investor-state disputes, and justifying or criticizing the current system of investment protection. This book is the first in-depth study on the methodological challenges and benefits of historical approaches in international investment law. As such, it is a vital tool for scholars and practitioners in the field who wish to understand ways in which to use historical research and analysis to improve and redefine international investment law.

The Force of Law (Hardcover): Frederick Schauer The Force of Law (Hardcover)
Frederick Schauer
R664 R570 Discovery Miles 5 700 Save R94 (14%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Many legal theorists maintain that laws are effective because we internalize them, obeying even when not compelled to do so. In a comprehensive reassessment of the role of force in law, Frederick Schauer disagrees, demonstrating that coercion, more than internalized thinking and behaving, distinguishes law from society s other rules.

Reinvigorating ideas from Jeremy Bentham and John Austin, and drawing on empirical research as well as philosophical analysis, Schauer presents an account of legal compliance based on sanction and compulsion, showing that law s effectiveness depends fundamentally on its coercive potential. Law, in short, is about telling people what to do and threatening them with bad consequences if they fail to comply. Although people may sometimes obey the law out of deference to legal authority rather than fear of sanctions, Schauer challenges the assumption that legal coercion is marginal in society. Force is more pervasive than the state s efforts to control a minority of disobedient citizens. When people believe that what they should do differs from what the law commands, compliance is less common than assumed, and the necessity of coercion becomes apparent.

Challenging prevailing modes of jurisprudential inquiry, Schauer makes clear that the question of legal force has sociological, psychological, political, and economic dimensions that transcend purely conceptual concerns. Grappling with the legal system s dependence on force helps us understand what law is, how it operates, and how it helps organize society."

Legalism - Anthropology and History (Hardcover): Paul Dresch, Hannah Skoda Legalism - Anthropology and History (Hardcover)
Paul Dresch, Hannah Skoda
R1,995 Discovery Miles 19 950 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Law and law-like institutions are visible in human societies very distant from each other in time and space. When it comes to observing and analysing such social constructs historians, anthropologists, and lawyers run into notorious difficulties in how to conceptualize them. Do they conform to a single category of 'law'? How are divergent understandings of the nature and purpose of law to be described and explained? Such questions reach to the heart of philosophical attempts to understand the nature of law, but arise whenever we are confronted by law-like practices and concepts in societies not our own. In this volume leading historians and anthropologists with an interest in law gather to analyse the nature and meaning of law in diverse societies. They start from the concept of legalism, taken from the anthropologist Lloyd Fallers, whose 1960s work on Africa engaged, unusually, with jurisprudence. The concept highlights appeal to categories and rules. The degree to which legalism in this sense informs people's lives varies within and between societies, and over time, but it can colour equally both 'simple' and 'complex' law. Breaking with recent emphases on 'practice', nine specialist contributors explore, in a wide-ranging set of cases, the place of legalism in the workings of social life. The essays make obvious the need to question our parochial common sense where ideals of moral order at other times and places differ from those of modern North Atlantic governance. State-centred law, for instance, is far from a 'central case'. Legalism may be 'aspirational', connecting people to wider visions of morality; duty may be as prominent a theme as rights; and rulers from thirteenth-century England to sixteenth-century Burma appropriate, as much they impose, a vision of justice as consistency. The use of explicit categories and rules does not reduce to simple questions of power. The cases explored range from ancient Asia Minor to classical India, and from medieval England and France to Saharan oases and southern Arabia. In each case they assume no knowledge of the society or legal system discussed. The volume will appeal not only to historians and anthropologists with an interest in law, but to students of law engaged in legal theory, for the light it sheds on the strengths and limitations of abstract legal philosophy.

David Hughes Parry - A Jurist in Society (Hardcover, New): R. Parry David Hughes Parry - A Jurist in Society (Hardcover, New)
R. Parry
R1,196 Discovery Miles 11 960 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Sir David Hughes Parry QC was probably one of the most powerful and influential Welsh jurists of the twentieth century. As Professor of English Law at the University of London, he laid the foundations for the development of the Department of Law at the London School and Economics into a centre of excellence in legal scholarship. As founding Director of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, he created a vehicle that would raise the standing of English legal scholarship on the global stage. An astute operator in the world of university politics, he became Vice-Chancellor and, later, Chairman of the Court of the University of London, and served as Vice-Chairman of the powerful University Grants Committee. For the first time, this study provides a holistic account of his career as a lawyer, legal scholar, university policy-maker and law reformer. Using a range of primary and secondary sources, it locates his place in the history of legal scholarship and establishes his identity as a jurist. It also considers his distinctive and sometimes controversial contribution to the public life of Wales, and in particular its language, culture and institutions. The portrait that emerges is of a man whose energies were divided equally between his legal-academic interests and his devotion to serving the causes of his native Wales. This biography demonstrates that it was through his roles as a public intellectual and legal advisor to the Welsh nation that Hughes Parry bequeathed his most important and enduring legacies.

Writing for Hire - Unions, Hollywood, and Madison Avenue (Hardcover): Catherine L Fisk Writing for Hire - Unions, Hollywood, and Madison Avenue (Hardcover)
Catherine L Fisk
R602 R561 Discovery Miles 5 610 Save R41 (7%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
Law, Liberty and the Constitution - A Brief History of the Common Law (Hardcover): Harry Potter Law, Liberty and the Constitution - A Brief History of the Common Law (Hardcover)
Harry Potter
R600 R475 Discovery Miles 4 750 Save R125 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Throughout English history the rule of law and the preservation of liberty have been inseparable, and both are intrinsic to England's constitution. This accessible and entertaining history traces the growth of the law from its beginnings in Anglo-Saxon times to the present day. It shows how the law evolved from a means of ensuring order and limiting feuds to become a supremely sophisticated dispenser of justice and the primary guardian of civil liberties. This development owed much to the English kings and their judiciary, who, in the twelfth century, forged a unified system of law - predating that of any other European country - from almost wholly Anglo-Saxon elements. Yet by the seventeenth century this royal offspring - Oedipus Lex it could be called - was capable of regicide. Since then the law has had a somewhat fractious relationship with that institution upon which the regal mantle of supreme power descended, Parliament. This book tells the story of the common law not merely by describing major developments but by concentrating on prominent personalities and decisive cases relating to the constitution, criminal jurisprudence, and civil liberties. It investigates the great constitutional conflicts, the rise of advocacy, and curious and important cases relating to slavery, insanity, obscenity, cannibalism, the death penalty, and miscarriages of justice. The book concludes by examining the extension of the law into the prosecution of war criminals and protection of universal human rights and the threats posed by over-reaction to national emergencies and terrorism. Devoid of jargon and replete with good stories, Law, Liberty and the Constitution represents a new approach to the telling of legal history and will be of interest to anyone wishing to know more about the common law - the spinal cord of the English body politic. Harry Potter is a former fellow of Selwyn College, Cambridge and a practising barrister specialising in criminal defence. He has authored books on the death penalty and Scottish history and wrote and presented an award-winning series on the history of the common law for the BBC.

The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Australia - History, Principle and Interpretation (Paperback): Nicholas Aroney, Peter... The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Australia - History, Principle and Interpretation (Paperback)
Nicholas Aroney, Peter Gerangelos, James Stellios, Sarah Murray
R2,069 R1,964 Discovery Miles 19 640 Save R105 (5%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Australia examines the body of constitutional jurisprudence in an original and rigorous yet accessible way. It begins by exploring the historical and intellectual context of ideas surrounding the Constitution's inception, and closely examines its text, structure, principles and purposes in that light. The book then unpacks and critically analyses the High Court's interpretation of the Constitution in a manner that follows the Constitution's own logic and method of organisation. Each topic is defined through detailed reference to the existing case law, which is set out historically to facilitate an appreciation of the progressive development of constitutional doctrine since the Constitution came into force in 1901. The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Australia provides an engaging and distinctive treatment of this fundamental area of law. It is an excellent book for anyone seeking to understand the significance and interpretation of the Constitution.

Being a Judge in the Modern World (Paperback): Jeremy Cooper Being a Judge in the Modern World (Paperback)
Jeremy Cooper
R635 Discovery Miles 6 350 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The role of the judiciary is constantly evolving and is in many ways more important than ever. Indeed, many argue that the sovereignty of parliament is eroding and being replaced by the respective power of judges. The Jackson Reforms of 2010, for example, saw judges bestowed with more power over case and budget management than ever before. Equally, courtrooms are transforming under the weight of technological innovation and the increasing presence of litigants in person. Stemming from a series of lectures arranged by the Judicial College on the theme of 'Being a Judge in the Modern World', this book provides a survey of many significant aspects of the modern judicial role. With contributions from some of the most senior judges in the UK and beyond, this collection provides a unique and firsthand insight into the development of the legal system and the challenges faced by today's judiciary. Additional contributions from the realms of journalism and civil liberties offer an external perspective and provide a wider context to the judicial voices.

Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society - The Forgotten Emancipator: James Mitchell Ashley and the Ideological... Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society - The Forgotten Emancipator: James Mitchell Ashley and the Ideological Origins of Reconstruction (Hardcover)
Rebecca E. Zietlow
R868 Discovery Miles 8 680 Shipped within 8 - 13 working days

Congressman James M. Ashley, a member of the House of Representatives from 1858 to 1868, and was the main sponsor of the Thirteenth Amendment to the American Constitution, which declared the institution of slavery unconstitutional. Rebecca E. Zietlow uses Ashley's life as a unique lens through which to explore the ideological origins of Reconstruction and the constitutional changes of this era. Zietlow recounts how Ashley and his antislavery allies shared an egalitarian free labor ideology that was influenced by the political antislavery movement and the nascent labor movement - a vision that conflicted directly with the institution of slavery. Ashley's story sheds important light on the meaning and power of popular constitutionalism: how the constitution is interpreted outside of the courts and the power that citizens and their elected officials can have in enacting legal change. The book shows how Reconstruction not only expanded racial equality but also transformed the rights of workers throughout America.

Slavish Shore - The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana Jr. (Hardcover): Jeffrey L Amestoy Slavish Shore - The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana Jr. (Hardcover)
Jeffrey L Amestoy
R644 R470 Discovery Miles 4 700 Save R174 (27%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In 1834 Harvard dropout Richard Henry Dana Jr. became a common seaman, and soon his Two Years Before the Mast became a classic. Literary acclaim did not erase the young lawyer's memory of floggings he witnessed aboard ship or undermine his vow to combat injustice. Jeffrey Amestoy tells the story of Dana's determination to keep that vow.

Portrait of a Patriot v. 3 - The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior (Hardcover): Josiah Quincy Portrait of a Patriot v. 3 - The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior (Hardcover)
Josiah Quincy; Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette, Neil Longley York
R859 Discovery Miles 8 590 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Providing readers with the unusual opportunity to enter into the extraordinary mind of a patriot in the period immediately preceding the Revolution, the Portrait of a Patriot series presents the major papers of the Boston lawyer and patriot penman Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744-1775). In this, the third of five volumes, we meet Quincy as a rising member of the Massachusetts bar and a member of the Boston Committee of Correspondence, making a tour of the Southern colonies to assess the depth of commitment to the patriot cause there. While cautious of the political leanings of his hosts, Quincy was clearly dazzled by the opulence and sophistication of late-eighteenth-century Charleston society. As he traveled northward, he continued to record candid observations on Southern manners, womenfolk, and the institution of slavery in his journal, thus creating a unique portrait of American society on the eve of the American Revolution.

Research Handbook on the History of Copyright Law (Paperback): Isabella Alexander, H. Tomas Gomez-Arostegui Research Handbook on the History of Copyright Law (Paperback)
Isabella Alexander, H. Tomas Gomez-Arostegui
R901 Discovery Miles 9 010 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

There has been an explosion of interest in recent years regarding the origin and of intellectual property law. The study of copyright history, in particular, has grown remarkably in the last twenty years, with a flurry of activity in the last ten. This Handbook takes stock of the field of copyright history as it stands today, as well as examining potential developments in the future. The contributions feature copyright and history experts from across the UK, Australia, the United States, France, Spain and Italy. Covering European, US and international copyright history and traversing from the 16th Century to the early 20th century, this book offers a broad survey of the field and a solid foundation for future research. Students and scholars of copyright law, authorship, art, and the book and music trades will find this book to be an invaluable resource. It will also be of use to practising lawyers and judges with an interest in the doctrinal history of copyright law.

Masculinity and the Trials of Modern Fiction (Paperback): Marco Wan Masculinity and the Trials of Modern Fiction (Paperback)
Marco Wan
R824 Discovery Miles 8 240 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

How do lawyers, judges and jurors read novels? And what is at stake when literature and law confront each other in the courtroom? Nineteenth-century England and France are remembered for their active legal prosecution of literature, and this book examines the ways in which five novels were interpreted in the courtroom: Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Paul Bonnetain's Charlot s'amuse, Henry Vizetelly's English translation of Emile Zola's La Terre, Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray and Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness. It argues that each of these novels attracted legal censure because they presented figures of sexual dissidence - the androgyne, the onanist or masturbator, the patricide, the homosexual and the lesbian - that called into question an increasingly fragile normative, middleclass masculinity. Offering close readings of the novels themselves, and of legal material from the proceedings, such as the trial transcripts and judicial opinions, the book addresses both the doctrinal dimensions of Victorian obscenity and censorship, as well as the reading practices at work in the courtroom. It situates the cases in their historical context, and highlights how each trial constitutes a scene of reading - an encounter between literature and the law - through which different forms of masculinity were shaped, bolstered or challenged.

New Histories of American Law - The Partisan Republic: Democracy, Exclusion, and the Fall of the Founders' Constitution,... New Histories of American Law - The Partisan Republic: Democracy, Exclusion, and the Fall of the Founders' Constitution, 1780s-1830s (Hardcover)
Gerald Leonard, Saul Cornell
R1,641 R1,542 Discovery Miles 15 420 Save R99 (6%) Shipped within 8 - 13 working days

The Partisan Republic is the first book to unite a top down and bottom up account of constitutional change in the Founding era. The book focuses on the decline of the Founding generation's elitist vision of the Constitution and the rise of a more 'democratic' vision premised on the exclusion of women and non-whites. It incorporates recent scholarship on topics ranging from judicial review to popular constitutionalism to place judicial initiatives like Marbury vs Madison in a broader, socio-legal context. The book recognizes the role of constitutional outsiders as agents in shaping the law, making figures such as the Whiskey Rebels, Judith Sargent Murray, and James Forten part of a cast of characters that has traditionally been limited to white, male elites such as James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Marshall. Finally, it shows how the 'democratic' political party came to supplant the Supreme Court as the nation's pre-eminent constitutional institution.

Rethinking Legal Reasoning (Hardcover): Geoffrey Samuel Rethinking Legal Reasoning (Hardcover)
Geoffrey Samuel
R2,313 Discovery Miles 23 130 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

`Rethinking' legal reasoning seems a bold aim given the large amount of literature devoted to this topic. In this thought-provoking book, Geoffrey Samuel proposes a different way of approaching legal reasoning by examining the topic through the context of legal knowledge (epistemology). What is it to have knowledge of legal reasoning? At a more specific level the pursuit of this understanding is conducted through posing a number of questions that are founded on different approaches. What has legal reasoning been? What are the institutional and conceptual legacies of this history? What is the literature and textual heritage? How does it compare with medical reasoning and with reasoning in the humanities? Can it be demystified? In exploring these questions Samuel suggests a number of frameworks that offer some new insights into the nature of legal reasoning. The author also puts forward two key ideas. First, that the legal notion of an `interest' might perhaps be a very suitable artefact for rethinking legal reasoning; and, secondly, that fiction theory might be the most viable `epistemological attitude' for understanding, if not rethinking, reasoning in law. This book will be of great interest to academics who are researching legal method and legal reasoning, as well as epistemology of the social sciences and aspects of comparative law. It will also be an insightful text for those interested in legal history and historical perspectives on legal reasoning.

Marcus Tullius Cicero - Speeches on Behalf of Marcus Fonteius and Marcus Aemilius Scaurus: Translated with Introduction and... Marcus Tullius Cicero - Speeches on Behalf of Marcus Fonteius and Marcus Aemilius Scaurus: Translated with Introduction and Commentary (Paperback)
Andrew R. Dyck
R697 Discovery Miles 6 970 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Besides his renowned prosecution of Gaius Verres, Cicero also appeared as defence counsel in a number of cases in which former governors were accused of misconduct in the provinces. This volume unites two such defences, both incompletely preserved, from an early phase of Cicero's career (ca. 69 BC) and from his maturity (54 BC). The first speech is on behalf of Marcus Fonteius. Fonteius was governor of Transalpine Gaul probably from 74 to 72 BC, a time when the Romans were consolidating their control of that province and simultaneously fighting a bitter war with rebels under Sertorius in the Iberian Peninsula. Cicero defends Fonteius with the argument that his measures, though severe, were in the state interest. The second speech is on behalf of Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, governor of Sardinia in 55, whose charges included not only peculation but also cruelty and hounding a woman to suicide through his unwanted attentions. In both cases Cicero seeks to stir Roman prejudice against the foreign witnesses testifying for the prosecution. The outcome of Fonteius' case is not clear from surviving evidence, but Scaurus was acquitted, only to be condemned and exiled on charges of corrupt electoral practices three years later. Dyck's volume provides a general introduction on the Roman extortion court and, for each speech, an introduction, English translation, and the first detailed commentary in English.

Constitutionalism in Ireland, 1932-1938 - National, Commonwealth, and International Perspectives (Paperback, Softcover Reprint... Constitutionalism in Ireland, 1932-1938 - National, Commonwealth, and International Perspectives (Paperback, Softcover Reprint Of The Original 1st Ed. 2018)
Donal K. Coffey
R1,875 Discovery Miles 18 750 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
Britain and the Mine, 1900-1915 - Culture, Strategy and International Law (Paperback, Softcover Reprint Of The Original 1st Ed.... Britain and the Mine, 1900-1915 - Culture, Strategy and International Law (Paperback, Softcover Reprint Of The Original 1st Ed. 2018)
Richard Dunley
R2,046 Discovery Miles 20 460 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
Across Oceans of Law - The Komagata Maru and Jurisdiction in the Time of Empire (Paperback): Renisa Mawani Across Oceans of Law - The Komagata Maru and Jurisdiction in the Time of Empire (Paperback)
Renisa Mawani
R576 R462 Discovery Miles 4 620 Save R114 (20%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In 1914 the British-built and Japanese-owned steamship Komagata Maru left Hong Kong for Vancouver carrying 376 Punjabi migrants. Chartered by railway contractor and purported rubber planter Gurdit Singh, the ship and its passengers were denied entry into Canada and two months later were deported to Calcutta. In Across Oceans of Law Renisa Mawani retells this well-known story of the Komagata Maru. Drawing on "oceans as method"-a mode of thinking and writing that repositions land and sea-Mawani examines the historical and conceptual stakes of situating histories of Indian migration within maritime worlds. Through close readings of the ship, the manifest, the trial, and the anticolonial writings of Singh and others, Mawani argues that the Komagata Maru's landing raised urgent questions regarding the jurisdictional tensions between the common law and admiralty law, and, ultimately, the legal status of the sea. By following the movements of a single ship and bringing oceans into sharper view, Mawani traces British imperial power through racial, temporal, and legal contests and offers a novel method of writing colonial legal history.

Law and the Imagination in Medieval Wales (Hardcover): Robin Chapman Stacey Law and the Imagination in Medieval Wales (Hardcover)
Robin Chapman Stacey
R1,724 R1,412 Discovery Miles 14 120 Save R312 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In Law and the Imagination in Medieval Wales, Robin Chapman Stacey explores the idea of law as a form of political fiction: a body of literature that blurs the lines generally drawn between the legal and literary genres. She argues that for jurists of thirteenth-century Wales, legal writing was an intensely imaginative genre, one acutely responsive to nationalist concerns and capable of reproducing them in sophisticated symbolic form. She identifies narrative devices and tropes running throughout successive revisions of legal texts that frame the body as an analogy for unity and for the court, that equate maleness with authority and just rule and femaleness with its opposite, and that employ descriptions of internal and external landscapes as metaphors for safety and peril, respectively. Historians disagree about the context in which the lawbooks of medieval Wales should be read and interpreted. Some accept the claim that they originated in a council called by the tenth-century king Hywel Dda, while others see them less as a repository of ancient custom than as the Welsh response to the general resurgence in law taking place in western Europe. Stacey builds on the latter approach to argue that whatever their origins, the lawbooks functioned in the thirteenth century as a critical venue for political commentary and debate on a wide range of subjects, including the threat posed to native independence and identity by the encroaching English; concerns about violence and disunity among the native Welsh; abusive behavior on the part of native officials; unwelcome changes in native practice concerning marriage, divorce, and inheritance; and fears about the increasing political and economic role of women.

Free Delivery
Pinterest Twitter Facebook Google+
You may like...
Under Devil's Peak - The Life And Times…
Gavin Cooper Paperback  (2)
R260 R206 Discovery Miles 2 060
Regsalmanak - 100 Stories Uit Ons…
Gustaf Pienaar Paperback R281 Discovery Miles 2 810
Rule Of Law - A Memoir
Glynnis Breytenbach, Nechama Brodie Paperback  (2)
R285 R245 Discovery Miles 2 450
John Marshall - The Man Who Made the…
Richard Brookhiser Hardcover  (1)
R549 R403 Discovery Miles 4 030
The Lion & The Thespian - The True Story…
David Bloomberg Paperback  (1)
R300 R238 Discovery Miles 2 380
The Justice Gap - Whatever Happened to…
Steve Hynes, Jon Robins Paperback R435 Discovery Miles 4 350
Bar, Bench & Bullshifters - Cape Tales…
Gerald Friedman, Jeremy Gauntlett Paperback R198 R157 Discovery Miles 1 570
Lawfare - Judging Politics In South…
Michelle Le Roux, Dennis Davis Paperback R275 R189 Discovery Miles 1 890
Cambridge Latin American Studies, Series…
Christoph Rosenmuller Hardcover R1,678 R1,552 Discovery Miles 15 520
The Land Is Ours - Black Lawyers And The…
Tembeka Ngcukaitobi Paperback  (10)
R290 R228 Discovery Miles 2 280

 

Partners