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Books > History > History of specific subjects > Local history

Historic England: Southampton - Unique Images from the Archives of Historic England (Paperback): Dave Marden Historic England: Southampton - Unique Images from the Archives of Historic England (Paperback)
Dave Marden; Contributions by Historic England
R419 R359 Discovery Miles 3 590 Save R60 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This illustrated history portrays one of England's finest cities. It provides a nostalgic look at Southampton's past and highlights the special character of some of its most important historic sites. The photographs are taken from the Historic England Archive, a unique collection of over 12 million photographs, drawings, plans and documents covering England's archaeology, architecture, social and local history. Pictures date from the earliest days of photography to the present and cover subjects from Bronze Age burials and medieval churches to cinemas and seaside resorts. Historic England: Southampton shows the city as it once was, from its churches, parks, streets and alleyways to its famous old docks. The city, once a popular eighteenth-century spa resort, has grown with the expansion of its commercial docks throughout the last 200 years and has witnessed everything from seamen's strikes to shipwrecks, notably the Titanic and Queen Mary, as well as the other famous ocean liners that have called at the port since the 1840s. The city suffered greatly during the twentieth century when extensive Second World War bombing and subsequent town planning led to a reduction in the number of many fine and interesting buildings. Dramatic changes have taken place and, by the late twentieth century and into the twenty-first century, it has been transformed into a new, dynamic, bustling city. This book will help you discover Southampton's colourful and fascinating history.

Secret Monmouth (Paperback): Louise Wyatt Secret Monmouth (Paperback)
Louise Wyatt
R419 R358 Discovery Miles 3 580 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Monmouth, the historic county town of Monmouthshire in Wales, was the site of a Bronze Age boatbuilding community and a Roman fort. Today's town was built around a Norman castle, guarding the River Wye, close to the border with England and Offa's Dyke. The castle, built by William the Conqueror's childhood friend William FitzOsbern, still contains the Territorial Army, making it one of the longest-occupied castles in Britain. It was also a favourite residence of Henry IV and the birthplace of Henry V. The medieval stone Monnow Bridge gatehouse, the only surviving example in Britain, was part of the town's original defensive wall, as was the defensive ditch and its surviving medieval bridge at nearby Overmonnow. In later centuries Nelson visited Monmouth and stayed at the Kymin, a few miles outside the town. Monmouth once had a port and wharves and its shipping and naval links extended to Tintern and the River Wye as well as the Forest of Dean. Also nearby was the family estate of the Rolls family, whose most famous son was Charles Rolls, co-founder of Rolls-Royce. Secret Monmouth explores the lesser-known episodes and characters in the town's history through the centuries. Fully illustrated, it will appeal to all those with an interest in this area of Wales.

A-Z of Ely - Places-People-History (Paperback): Michael Rouse A-Z of Ely - Places-People-History (Paperback)
Michael Rouse
R419 R358 Discovery Miles 3 580 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Ely was built around its cathedral, the first abbey founded by theAnglo-Saxons on an island in the Fens. Ely was a centre of resistance against the Norman invaders including the legendary Hereward the Wake, but when Ely was retaken by the Normans they built the magnificent cathedral that dominates the landscape today. The monastery was one of the richest in the country and brought prosperity to the region, and the city was also the centre of the traditional Fenland economy. The area went into decline following the Dissolution of the Monasteries and the drainage of the Fens. Ely has grown again in recent times, and today the city happily combines its historic fabric with the life of a vibrant, growing city. A-Z of Ely reveals the stories behind the Fenland city of Ely, its streets, buildings and people and how its residents and visitors have shaped the city today, This fascinating A-Z tour of Ely's history is fully illustrated and will appeal to all those with an interest in this distinctive city in Cambridgeshire.

Historic England: York - Unique Images from the Archives of Historic England (Paperback): Paul Chrystal Historic England: York - Unique Images from the Archives of Historic England (Paperback)
Paul Chrystal
R418 R358 Discovery Miles 3 580 Save R60 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This illustrated history portrays one of England's finest cities. It provides a nostalgic look at York's past and highlights the special character of some of its most important historic sites. The photographs are taken from the Historic England Archive, a unique collection of over 12 million photographs, drawings, plans and documents covering England's archaeology, architecture, social and local history. Pictures date from the earliest days of photography to the present and cover subjects from Bronze Age burials and medieval churches to cinemas and seaside resorts. Historic England: York shows the city as it once was, from its streets and alleys (known locally as snickelways) to the glorious York Minster. It is a city of strong medieval character, combining grandeur and quirkiness, whose shortest street has the longest name, and where the remains of Roman and Viking life can still be seen.

Dartmoor From Old Photographs (Paperback): John Van Der Kiste Dartmoor From Old Photographs (Paperback)
John Van Der Kiste
R420 R342 Discovery Miles 3 420 Save R78 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The history of Dartmoor extends to several centuries BC, with surviving prehistoric remains dating back to the late Neolithic and early Bronze Age, and the largest concentration of Bronze Age remains in Britain. It has been a hunting ground for the Kings of Wessex, a royal forest, and home to farmers in ancient and medieval times, and a source of tin, iron and granite. In the twenty first century it has a resident population of about 33,000, including those in the towns of Ashburton, Buckfastleigh, Moretonhampstead, Princetown and Yelverton. Some areas have provided a training ground for the army, and in 1951 it was officially designated a National Park. Its legends abound, with tales of headless horsemen, pixies, a large black dog, a mysterious pack of hounds, and a visit said to have been made by the devil to Widecombe in 1638 during a fierce thunderstorm. It has also provided a home and inspiration to writers including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, and John Galsworthy. These photographs span the era from the late nineteenth century to the mid twentieth century, chosen to show the diversity of the landscape, the towns and villages, and the different uses made of Dartmoor as a source of local employment and industry, as well as a haven for wildlife and recreation, and above all the beauty and spirit of the area.

Live, Work and Play - A Centenary History of Welwyn Garden City (Hardcover): Mark Clapson Live, Work and Play - A Centenary History of Welwyn Garden City (Hardcover)
Mark Clapson
R558 R448 Discovery Miles 4 480 Save R110 (20%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Books about history using real life memories recorded specifically for the purpose are rare, 'Live, Work & Play' is just such a book. Created from the hundreds of reminiscences of the residents of the town gathered by the WGC Heritage Trust and put into historical context by Prof Mark Clapson , one of the UK's leading social historians, the book offers a unique insight into the creation of the UK's second garden city. Timed to appear at the start of 2020, when Welwyn Garden City achieves its 100th year, the history of Sir Ebenezer Howard's final masterpiece, with all its imperfections, is laid out for all to read. Now thriving and at ease with itself WGC is an example of how to create homes for its community. Created as a Garden City in 1920, developed as a New Town from 1948 the lessons it offers are invaluable to both developers and governments alike.

Fictional London - A Guide to the Capital's Literary Landmarks (Hardcover, 2nd New edition): Stephen Halliday Fictional London - A Guide to the Capital's Literary Landmarks (Hardcover, 2nd New edition)
Stephen Halliday
R358 R262 Discovery Miles 2 620 Save R96 (27%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

'By seeing London, I have seen as much of life as the world can show.' - Samuel Johnson From Chaucer's pilgrims meeting in a Southwark inn to the Hogwarts Express leaving from King's Cross, London has always been a popular place for writers to weave into their own work. With its bustling, multicultural population and unique localised weather, the city is almost a character in its own right. Fictional London explores the capital through the eyes of both the reader and the writer. Celebrated London historian Stephen Halliday traces the stories from one end of London to the other, digging into the history and character that has made it an unrivalled source of inspiration for authors and poets from the Middle Ages to the early 2000s and beyond.

The Cornish in the Caribbean - From the 17th to the 19th Centuries (Hardcover): Sue Appleby The Cornish in the Caribbean - From the 17th to the 19th Centuries (Hardcover)
Sue Appleby
R473 R385 Discovery Miles 3 850 Save R88 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The first book to look specifically at the movement of Cornish men and women to and from the Caribbean from the early days of colonialism. A fascinating subject for those with an interest in all things Cornish, be they in Cornwall, in the Caribbean, or in the wider Cornish diaspora. The Cornish in the Caribbean is the first study to tell the stories of some of the many Cornish men and women who went to the Caribbean. Some became wealthy plantation owners, while others came as indentured servants and labourers. Cornish men were active in the armed services, taking part in the numerous sea and land battles fought by the competing European powers throughout the region. Cornish officers and crew sailed on the ships of the Falmouth Packet Service which took the mail to and from the Caribbean. Methodism was strong in Cornwall and Methodist missionaries and their wives came to the Caribbean to evangelise both the enslaved and the newly free. The most striking transfer of Cornish skills to the Caribbean was to be found in mining. As Cornish mining declined, and the Great Emigration of miners and their families got underway, Cornish mining engineers, captains and miners went out to mines throughout the Caribbean. "Meticulously researched and highly readable" Bridget Brereton, Professor Emerita, University of the West Indies.

Portsmouth at Work - People and Industries Through the Years (Paperback): Philip MacDougall Portsmouth at Work - People and Industries Through the Years (Paperback)
Philip MacDougall
R417 R356 Discovery Miles 3 560 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Portsmouth is best known for its longterm association with the Royal Navy. Its naval dockyard was at one time the world's largest employer of a civilian workforce. While there can be no dispute that the navy, for many centuries, totally dominated the town, it was not, by any means, the only employer. Others were active in the various service industries that met the needs of those employed in the dockyard or the navy: a largescale tailoring industry that initially began in the production of service uniforms, but rapidly expanded to meet more general needs far beyond that of Portsmouth; brewing, with Portsmouth boasting more pubs per head of population than any other city in the UK; and, of course, entertainment, as its many theatres, cinemas and music halls provided alternative diversions for a large population of off-duty sailors. Portsmouth at Work explores the life of Portsmouth and its people, from pre-industrial beginnings through to the present day. In a fascinating series of contemporary photographs and illustrations it takes us through the phenomenal growth of the naval dockyard and the city's role as a major seaport, the part it played in both world wars and subsequent conflicts, and into the twenty-first century as Portsmouth has adapted to the reduced size of the British Navy with the development of other industries.

Windsor Great Park - The Walker's Guide (Paperback): David McDowall Windsor Great Park - The Walker's Guide (Paperback)
David McDowall; Created by Angela Kidner; Designed by Peter Moore
R293 Discovery Miles 2 930 Ships in 10 - 15 working days
A History of the County of Northampton - VII: Corby and Great Oakley (Hardcover): Mark Page, Matthew Bristow A History of the County of Northampton - VII: Corby and Great Oakley (Hardcover)
Mark Page, Matthew Bristow
R2,607 R2,346 Discovery Miles 23 460 Save R261 (10%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Lying in north Northamptonshire, close to the borders with Leicestershire and Rutland, the neighbouring parishes of Corby and Great Oakley were formerly part of the ancient administrative division of Corby hundred. Both remained agricultural villages, typical of much of rural Northamptonshire before 1932 when the landscape of the area was dramatically altered by large-scale industrialisation associated with the production of iron and steel following the discovery of rich ironstone deposits to the north and east of Corby village. Corby was most directly affected by these changes, with the parish experiencing a dramatic rise in population after the Stewarts & Lloyds Company chose to concentrate their entire steel producing operation there. Between 1932 and 1950, the increasing population resulted in the hasty construction, firstly by the Stewarts & Lloyds Company and later by the Corby UDC, of housing estates on former agricultural land adjacent to the steelworks, before Corby was designated a New Town in April 1950 and responsibility for it passed to the Corby Development Corporation. From this point on, Great Oakley was inexorably drawn into the expanding new town as it spread southwards, eventually being incorporated firstly into Corby urban district in1967 and in 1993 into Corby Borough. Although Corby is perhaps best known for the social problems or "New Town Blues" that blighted it after the steelworks (the town's principal employer) closed in 1980, this volume documents the lesser known medieval and early modern history of Corby and Great Oakley; it shows how generations of inhabitants utilised the rich natural geology and the abundant woodland to supplement the local agrarian economy, before examining in detail Corby's industrialisation, physical and economic growth, post-industrial decline and 21st-century regeneration. Mark Page is Assistant Editor, Victoria County History, Oxfordshire; Matthew Bristow is Research Manager, Victoria County History.

Blackpool Tower A History (Paperback, Uk Ed.): Peter Walton Blackpool Tower A History (Paperback, Uk Ed.)
Peter Walton
R419 R341 Discovery Miles 3 410 Save R78 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

When Blackpool Tower was being built, many people said it would be a failure. Originally estimated at GBP150,000, it ended up costing twice that much and John Bickerstaffe nearly went bust building this unique attraction. But he was right. Once the Tower was open, his company made a profit every year that it existed as an independent public entity. Not only was the Tower profitable, but it fuelled the Tower Company as Bickerstaffe built it into the dominant entertainment group in Blackpool. Under his leadership it acquired the Palace and later the Winter Gardens and Opera House. By the 1930s it was running ballrooms, cinemas, live theatre and the famous Tower Circus. The Bickerstaffe brothers were also key figures in Blackpool's civic life. This is a story of the Victorian entrepreneurship that created Blackpool's most iconic building, and led to Blackpool being the apogee of seaside entertainment.

How to Read the Landscape (Paperback): Robert Yarham How to Read the Landscape (Paperback)
Robert Yarham 1
R293 R242 Discovery Miles 2 420 Save R51 (17%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Interest in the environment has never been greater and yet most of us have little knowledge about the 4 billion years of history that formed it. This book explains the principles of geology, geography and geomorphology, and shows how a basic understanding of geological timescales, plate tectonics and landforms can help you 'read' the great outdoors. This is a highly illustrated book with a very accessible text that clearly illuminates the landscape around us.

Lundy: A Landmark 50 Years (Paperback): Simon Dell Lundy: A Landmark 50 Years (Paperback)
Simon Dell
R419 R341 Discovery Miles 3 410 Save R78 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

In 1968 Mr Albion Harman, the last owner of Lundy Island, in the Bristol Channel, died. His surviving two sisters, faced with a challenging future running the island, put Lundy up for auction. An appeal fund for GBP150,000 was started but unfortunately this failed. At the last minute of the auction Jack Hayward (later Sir Jack Hayward) bid the asking price and bought the island. He immediately donated it to the National Trust, who in turn leased it to the Landmark Trust, who still manage and look after this amazing wildlife and marine conservation area today. In 2019 the National Trust and Landmark Trust celebrate those fifty landmark years. Following on from the success of Lundy Through Time, author Simon Dell has written this book looking back at those fifty years and charting the significant changes in that time.

Southend History Tour (Paperback): David C. Rayment Southend History Tour (Paperback)
David C. Rayment
R223 R195 Discovery Miles 1 950 Save R28 (13%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Southend History Tour offers an insight into the fascinating history of this coastal town in Essex. Author David C. Rayment guides us around its well-known streets and buildings, showing how its famous landmarks used to look and how they have changed over the years, as well as exploring its lesser-known sights and hidden corners. With the help of a handy location map, and location maps of Shoebury and Leigh-on-Sea, readers are invited to follow a timeline of events and discover for themselves the changing face of Southend and around.

Faces of Edinburgh (Paperback): Manel Quiros Faces of Edinburgh (Paperback)
Manel Quiros
R419 R358 Discovery Miles 3 580 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Scotland's capital, one of Europe's most beautiful cities, has long been a magnet for visitors who come here in their droves to witness its spectacular setting and unique atmosphere, especially in July and August when it plays host to the world's biggest arts festival. Professional photographer Manel Quiros has made the city his home and knows its nooks and crannies: the elegant New Town streets and squares, the dark, murky Old Town wynds and alleyways. Charged with capturing the essence of Edinburgh, he has turned his camera on its inhabitants, the people who make the city what it is today. These are the people you'll find in these pages - the shopkeepers, schoolteachers, businessmen and women, pub landlords, restaurant owners, students and street performers, all of them taking pleasure in being a part of this special place and sharing their stories.

Dalkeith & Around Through Time (Paperback, UK ed.): Jack Gillon Dalkeith & Around Through Time (Paperback, UK ed.)
Jack Gillon
R419 R358 Discovery Miles 3 580 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The Midlothian town of Dalkeith has had an eventful history. Cromwell's officer, General Monck, was Commander in Scotland, and the government of the country was based out of Dalkeith Castle. In the seventeenth century, Dalkeith had one of Scotland's largest markets in its exceptionally broad High Street. In 1831 Dalkeith was linked to Edinburgh by a railway line that transported coal, minerals and agricultural produce. Two decades later, in 1853, a corn exchange, at the time the largest indoor grain market in Scotland, was built, and in 1879 Dalkeith was where Gladstone first started his campaign to become British prime minister. The surrounding villages also have their fair share of historical significance: Newtongrange was Scotland's largest mining village in the 1890s and today houses the National Mining Museum; Bonnyrigg was a mining village until the 1920s; Lasswade was a popular holiday resort in the nineteenth century for wealthy Edinburgh residents; and in nearby Roslin is Rosslyn Chapel, famous for its connections to the Knights Templar and the Holy Grail and which featured in The Da Vinci Code.

Lost Jarrow (Paperback): Paul Perry Lost Jarrow (Paperback)
Paul Perry
R419 R358 Discovery Miles 3 580 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The town of Jarrow in the north-east of England transformed in the nineteenth century when heavy industry, particularly coal mining and shipbuilding, began to dominate the town. At its peak 80 per cent of the town's working population were employed in the shipbuilding industry until 1933 at the demise of the Palmer shipbuilding empire. From this time the town relied upon ship repair as the mainstay industry, up until the last ship repair yard closed in 1981. Although the docks continued for another decade, they have been largely filled in today, and new industries have been attracted to the area during the redevelopment of the town. In this book well-known local author and photographer Paul Perry presents a portrait of a town and a way of life that has radically changed over the decades, much of which has disappeared today, showing not only the industries and buildings that have gone but also the people, street scenes, many popular places of entertainment and much more. This fascinating photographic history of lost Jarrow will appeal to all those who live in the town or know it well, as well as those who remember it from previous decades.

Anglesey Railways Through Time (Paperback, Uk Ed.): Mike Hitches Anglesey Railways Through Time (Paperback, Uk Ed.)
Mike Hitches
R419 R358 Discovery Miles 3 580 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

A railway arrived on Anglesey in 1848, linking London and Dublin. It was the great railway engineer Robert Stephenson who ensured that the railway link to Ireland would run along the North Wales coast to Holyhead when he presented plans that overcame the engineering challenges associated with the route. A branch was subsequently built from Gaerwen to Amlwch after the LNWR absorbed the CHR. This Anglesey Central Railway was first opened in around 1865 and completed in 1867. The LNWR won the contract to carry the Royal Mail by rail, but it was the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company that carried the mails across the Irish Sea. The LNWR did, however, build a magnificent inner harbour in the 1880s. The railway still runs from London to Holyhead and boats continue to sail from Holyhead to Ireland, but today only the Llanfair P.G., Valley (which serves the RAF base) and Holyhead stations remain.

Secret Chichester (Paperback, UK ed.): Philip MacDougall Secret Chichester (Paperback, UK ed.)
Philip MacDougall
R419 R341 Discovery Miles 3 410 Save R78 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Dr Philip MacDougall, local historian, takes you on a journey through the City of Chichester revealing much of its lesser-known history. Here you will find the story behind the city's nineteenth-century banking crisis, the activities of a London mob of criminals who targeted the Goodwood races, a fascinating collection of letters written during the First World War and even how local politicians once bribed potential voters with lashings of beer. Blending the serious and the not so serious and drawing heavily on primary sources, including newspapers and original documents, Secret Chichester gives a fascinating look at this city's past with images from long ago and today.

Secret Crawley and Gatwick (Paperback): Tina Brown Secret Crawley and Gatwick (Paperback)
Tina Brown
R419 R341 Discovery Miles 3 410 Save R78 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The Crawley and Gatwick area is fascinating and both have seen a great many changes. Gatwick Airport is central to this area, but has anyone stopped to think about its ancient Roman ironworks and how Crawley developed as a market town from the thirteenth century onwards? Crawley has always been known as a trade route with good connections both to the city of London and the coast at Brighton, so its location has always been important. The coming of the railways brought prosperity to Crawley and saw its first major expansion, as well as the development of Gatwick Racecourse and the original Gatwick airfield, which has now been swallowed by today's airport. After the Second World War, the town was designated a 'new town' and saw a vast increase in population and building, becoming one of the most important business and employment centres in south-east England. Crawley also has many buildings of historical importance dating back to the fifteenth century, and many Grade I and II listed buildings. Settlements close by on the Weald that are served by Crawley also have many secrets and stories connected to them, including numerous historical churches and manor houses. Secret Crawley & Gatwick brings the history of this area to life, highlighting that there is a whole lot more to it than just the airport.

Old Cockenzie and Port Seton (Paperback): Bernard Byrom Old Cockenzie and Port Seton (Paperback)
Bernard Byrom
R292 Discovery Miles 2 920 Ships in 10 - 15 working days
Tortilla Chronicles - Growing Up in Santa Fe (Hardcover): Tortilla Chronicles - Growing Up in Santa Fe (Hardcover)
R477 R390 Discovery Miles 3 900 Save R87 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

A family memoir full of New Mexico flavor, "Tortilla Chronicles" serves up a hearty helping of the "City Different" from the perspective of the humble, hardworking Romeros, a family honored for its contributions to regional folk arts. Marie Romero Cash, herself a renowned artist, poignantly sketches each family member using his or her own voice. Their stories present a rare glimpse into the life of a traditional Hispano family and provide an antidote to typical nostalgic tourist accounts of 1950s Santa Fe.

One of the main characters is Santa Fe itself, and the narrative tours the city's streets, shops, plaza, and surrounding hills and arroyos in astounding detail. The ancestry and rituals of family life, the culture and religion of northern New Mexico, and the growth of a neighborhood and its children are all part of the recipe.

Hythe History Tour (Paperback): Martin Easdown, Linda Sage Hythe History Tour (Paperback)
Martin Easdown, Linda Sage
R223 R195 Discovery Miles 1 950 Save R28 (13%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Hythe History Tour is a unique insight into the fascinating history of this attractive seaside town on the south-east coast of Kent and shows just how much it has changed during the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readers are invited to follow local authors and historians Martin Easdown and Linda Sage as they guide them along its streets, canal-side and seafront, pointing out the well-known and lesser-known landmarks along the way.

Irrigation, Timber, and Hydropower - Negotiating Natural Resource Development on the Flathead Indian Reservation, Montana,... Irrigation, Timber, and Hydropower - Negotiating Natural Resource Development on the Flathead Indian Reservation, Montana, 1904-1945 (Paperback)
Garrit Voggesser
R380 R304 Discovery Miles 3 040 Save R76 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Irrigation, Timber, and Hydropower is the story of the Flathead Irrigation Project and the Flathead Lake Dam, two early twentieth-century enterprises whose consequences are still felt today on the Flathead Reservation in western Montana. The Flathead Irrigation Project was originally promoted by Sen. Joseph M. Dixon as benefiting the Flathead Reservation tribes, but it soon became a medium for using tribal funds and assets to benefit white homesteaders. Garrit Voggesser traces the history of natural resource conflicts on the reservation and recounts how competing interests fought at the expense of the tribes. In the 1920s and early 1930s a national controversy swirled around the dam site at the foot of Flathead Lake. The lease for the dam site was granted to the Montana Power Company over the objections of the tribes, but the tribes retained ownership and were able to negotiate from a position of strength fifty years later when the lease came up for renewal. Voggesser describes the struggles of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes that ultimately secured their control of reservation resources and helped to build a better future for tribal members.

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