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The New Hacker's Dictionary (Paperback, third edition) Loot Price: R635
Discovery Miles 6 350
You Save: R176 (22%)
The New Hacker's Dictionary (Paperback, third edition): Eric S. Raymond
The New Hacker's Dictionary (Paperback, third edition): Eric S. Raymond

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The New Hacker's Dictionary (Paperback, third edition)

Eric S. Raymond

Series: The MIT Press

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List price R811 Loot Price R635 Discovery Miles 6 350 | Repayment Terms: R59 pm x 12* You Save R176 (22%)

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This new edition of the hacker's own phenomenally successful lexicon includes more than 100 new entries and updates or revises 200 more. This new edition of the hacker's own phenomenally successful lexicon includes more than 100 new entries and updates or revises 200 more. Historically and etymologically richer than its predecessor, it supplies additional background on existing entries and clarifies the murky origins of several important jargon terms (overturning a few long-standing folk etymologies) while still retaining its high giggle value. Sample definition hacker n. [originally, someone who makes furniture with an axe] 1. A person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities, as opposed to most users, who prefer to learn only the minimum necessary. 2. One who programs enthusiastically (even obsessively) or who enjoys programming rather than just theorizing about programming. 3. A person capable of appreciating {hack value}. 4. A person who is good at programming quickly. 5. An expert at a particular program, or one who frequently does work using it or on it; as in `a UNIX hacker'. (Definitions 1 through 5 are correlated, and people who fit them congregate.) 6. An expert or enthusiast of any kind. One might be an astronomy hacker, for example. 7. One who enjoys the intellectual challenge of creatively overcoming or circumventing limitations. 8. [deprecated] A malicious meddler who tries to discover sensitive information by poking around. Hence `password hacker', `network hacker'. The correct term is {cracker}. The term 'hacker' also tends to connote membership in the global community defined by the net (see {network, the} and {Internet address}). It also implies that the person described is seen to subscribe to some version of the hacker ethic (see {hacker ethic, the}). It is better to be described as a hacker by others than to describe oneself that way. Hackers consider themselves something of an elite (a meritocracy based on ability), though one to which new members are gladly welcome. There is thus a certain ego satisfaction to be had in identifying yourself as a hacker (but if you claim to be one and are not, you'll quickly be labeled {bogus}). See also {wannabee}.

General

Imprint: MIT Press
Country of origin: United States
Series: The MIT Press
Release date: October 1996
First published: 1996
Editors: Eric S. Raymond
Dimensions: 229 x 152 x 29mm (L x W x T)
Format: Paperback - Trade
Pages: 568
Edition: third edition
ISBN-13: 978-0-262-68092-9
Barcode: 9780262680929
Categories: Books > Reference & Interdisciplinary > Encyclopaedias & reference works > Reference works
Books > Reference & Interdisciplinary > Encyclopaedias & reference works > Reference works > General
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Books > Computing & IT > Applications of computing > Databases > Data security & data encryption
LSN: 0-262-68092-0

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