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Beyond the Synagogue Gallery - Finding a Place for Women in American Judaism (Hardcover) Loot Price: R1,033
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Beyond the Synagogue Gallery - Finding a Place for Women in American Judaism (Hardcover): Karla Goldman

Beyond the Synagogue Gallery - Finding a Place for Women in American Judaism (Hardcover)

Karla Goldman

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Loot Price R1,033 Discovery Miles 10 330 | Repayment Terms: R96 pm x 12*

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A thorough survey of the innovations introduced into the American synagogue in the 19th century by the Reform movement, focusing on the Jewish womans gradual religious emancipation.Traditional Judaism delineates the womans specific place in public worship, in particular prescribing the separation of the sexes during the service, proscribing female voices from joining in prayer, and, with a few exceptions, omitting any requirement that women attend the synagogue at all. These centuries-old arrangements did not jibe with the progressive ideas of gender equality espoused by the nascent Reform movement. Legitimizing a female presence in the synagogue was part of a larger project of the Reformist Jews, who wished to acquire a new American identity by making their public religious observance conform externally to the ways of their Protestant neighbors. Separate womens galleries were first replaced by mixed seating in 1851 (in an Albany synagogue), and a decade later many other temples introduced family pews, mirroring the custom of Christian churches. Men were relieved of the obligation to wear a prayer shawl and head covering, and a mixed choir and organ music were brought in, ostensibly for the sake of decorum. Other aspects of the reform included the use of vernacular instead of Hebrew, omission of the prayer for a messianic return to Zion, and even moving the holy day from Saturday to Sunday. By the end of the century, women were admitted as full members of the congregation, which first allowed their participation in synagogue administration and then in leading the worship itself. This process eventually led to the ordination of the first woman rabbi in 1972. Goldmans well-researched book highlights one important premise: that the original steps on the road to womens religious liberation were initially taken by acculturated male Jews, who often indiscriminately copied Christian politics and aesthetics.An interesting and well-written study. . (Kirkus Reviews)

"Beyond the Synagogue Gallery" recounts the emergence of new roles for American Jewish women in public worship and synagogue life. Karla Goldman's study of changing patterns of female religiosity is a story of acculturation, of adjustments made to fit Jewish worship into American society.

Goldman focuses on the nineteenth century. This was an era in which immigrant communities strove for middle-class respectability for themselves and their religion, even while fearing a loss of traditions and identity. For acculturating Jews some practices, like the ritual bath, quickly disappeared. Women's traditional segregation from the service in screened women's galleries was gradually replaced by family pews and mixed choirs. By the end of the century, with the rising tide of Jewish immigration from Russia and Eastern Europe, the spread of women's social and religious activism within a network of organizations brought collective strength to the nation's established Jewish community. Throughout these changing times, though, Goldman notes persistent ambiguous feelings about the appropriate place of women in Judaism, even among reformers.

This account of the evolving religious identities of American Jewish women expands our understanding of women's religious roles and of the Americanization of Judaism in the nineteenth century; it makes an essential contribution to the history of religion in America.

General

Imprint: Harvard University Press
Country of origin: United States
Release date: August 2000
First published: August 2000
Authors: Karla Goldman
Dimensions: 243 x 160 x 23mm (L x W x T)
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 288
ISBN-13: 978-0-674-00221-0
Categories: Books > Humanities > Religion & beliefs
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies
Books > Humanities > Religion & beliefs > Non-Christian religions
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Gender studies
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Ethnic studies
Books > Humanities > Religion & beliefs > Non-Christian religions > Judaism
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Gender studies > Women's studies
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Ethnic studies > Jewish studies
Books > Humanities > Religion & beliefs > Non-Christian religions > Judaism > General
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Gender studies > Women's studies > General
Books > Religion & Spirituality > Non-Christian religions
Books > Religion & Spirituality > Non-Christian religions > Judaism
Books > Religion & Spirituality > Non-Christian religions > Judaism > General
LSN: 0-674-00221-0
Barcode: 9780674002210

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