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Extinctions in Near Time - Causes, Contexts, and Consequences (Paperback, Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 1999) Loot Price: R3,272
Discovery Miles 32 720
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Extinctions in Near Time - Causes, Contexts, and Consequences (Paperback, Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 1999): Ross...
Extinctions in Near Time - Causes, Contexts, and Consequences (Paperback, Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 1999): Ross...

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Extinctions in Near Time - Causes, Contexts, and Consequences (Paperback, Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 1999)

Ross D.E. MacPhee, Hans-Dieter Sues

Series: Advances in Vertebrate Paleobiology, 2

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Loot Price R3,272 Discovery Miles 32 720 | Repayment Terms: R304 pm x 12*

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"Near time" -an interval that spans the last 100,000 years or so of earth history-qualifies as a remarkable period for many reasons. From an anthropocentric point of view, the out- standing feature of near time is the fact that the evolution, cultural diversification, and glob- al spread of Homo sapiens have all occurred within it. From a wider biological perspective, however, the hallmark of near time is better conceived of as being one of enduring, repeat- ed loss. The point is important. Despite the sense of uniqueness implicit in phrases like "the biodiversity crisis," meant to convey the notion that the present bout of extinctions is by far the worst endured in recent times, substantial losses have occurred throughout near time. In the majority of cases, these losses occurred when, and only when, people began to ex- pand across areas that had never before experienced their presence. Although the explana- tion for these correlations in time and space may seem obvious, it is one thing to rhetori- cally observe that there is a connection between humans and recent extinctions, and quite another to demonstrate it scientifically. How should this be done? Traditionally, the study of past extinctions has fallen largely to researchers steeped in such disciplines as paleontology, systematics, and paleoecology. The evaluation of future losses, by contrast, has lain almost exclusively within the domain of conservation biolo- gists. Now, more than ever, there is opportunity for overlap and sharing of information.

General

Imprint: Springer-Verlag New York
Country of origin: United States
Series: Advances in Vertebrate Paleobiology, 2
Release date: December 2010
First published: 1999
Editors: Ross D.E. MacPhee • Hans-Dieter Sues
Dimensions: 254 x 178 x 25mm (L x W x T)
Format: Paperback
Pages: 394
Edition: Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 1999
ISBN-13: 978-1-4419-3315-7
Barcode: 9781441933157
Categories: Books > Science & Mathematics > Biology, life sciences > Life sciences: general issues > Evolution
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Books > Earth & environment > Earth sciences > Palaeontology
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Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Anthropology
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Anthropology > General
LSN: 1-4419-3315-8

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