0
Your cart

Your cart is empty

Browse All departments
  • All departments
Price
  • R500 - R1,000 (7)
  • R1,000 - R2,500 (13)
  • R2,500 - R5,000 (3)
  • -
Status
Brand

Showing 1 - 23 of 23 matches in All departments

Is the Goddess a Feminist? - The Politics of South Asian Goddesses (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel, Kathleen M. Erndl Is the Goddess a Feminist? - The Politics of South Asian Goddesses (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel, Kathleen M. Erndl
R2,163 Discovery Miles 21 630 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In India, God can be female. The goddesses of Hinduism and Buddhism represent the largest extant collection of living goddesses anywhere on the planet. Feminists in the West often draw upon South Asian goddesses as theological resources in the contemporary rediscovery of the Goddess. Yet, these goddesses are products of a male supremacist society.

What is the impact of powerful female deities--their images, projections, textuality, and history--on the social standing and psychological health of women? Do they empower women, or serve the interests of patriarchal culture? Is the Goddess a Feminist? looks at the goddesses of South Asia to address these questions directly.

Not a book about a single goddess or even about a variety of South Asian goddesses, the volume raises questions about images of deities as symbols and the ways in which they function. Contributors discuss contemporary Indian women who have embraced goddesses as spiritually and socially liberating, as well as the seeming contradictions between the power of Indian goddesses and the lives of Indian women. They also explore such topics as the element of male desire in the embodiment of female deities, the question of who speaks for the goddesses, and the politics and theology of Western feminist use of Hindu and Buddhist goddesses as models for their feminist reflections.

Is the Goddess a Feminist? - The Politics of South Asian Goddesses (Paperback): Alf Hiltebeitel, Kathleen M. Erndl Is the Goddess a Feminist? - The Politics of South Asian Goddesses (Paperback)
Alf Hiltebeitel, Kathleen M. Erndl
R746 Discovery Miles 7 460 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In India, God can be female. The goddesses of Hinduism and Buddhism represent the largest extant collection of living goddesses anywhere on the planet. Feminists in the West often draw upon South Asian goddesses as theological resources in the contemporary rediscovery of the Goddess. Yet, these goddesses are products of a male supremacist society.

What is the impact of powerful female deities--their images, projections, textuality, and history--on the social standing and psychological health of women? Do they empower women, or serve the interests of patriarchal culture? Is the Goddess a Feminist? looks at the goddesses of South Asia to address these questions directly.

Not a book about a single goddess or even about a variety of South Asian goddesses, the volume raises questions about images of deities as symbols and the ways in which they function. Contributors discuss contemporary Indian women who have embraced goddesses as spiritually and socially liberating, as well as the seeming contradictions between the power of Indian goddesses and the lives of Indian women. They also explore such topics as the element of male desire in the embodiment of female deities, the question of who speaks for the goddesses, and the politics and theology of Western feminist use of Hindu and Buddhist goddesses as models for their feminist reflections.

A History of Religious Ideas, v. 3 - From Muhammad to the Age of Reforms (Paperback, New edition): Mircea Eliade A History of Religious Ideas, v. 3 - From Muhammad to the Age of Reforms (Paperback, New edition)
Mircea Eliade; Translated by Diane Apostolos Cappadona, Alf Hiltebeitel, D.A-. Cappadona
R611 R500 Discovery Miles 5 000 Save R111 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This volume completes the immensely learned three-volume "A History of Religious Ideas." Eliade examines the movement of Jewish thought out of ancient Eurasia, the Christian transformation of the Mediterranean area and Europe, and the rise and diffusion of Islam from approximately the sixth through the seventeenth centuries. Eliade's vast knowledge of past and present scholarship provides a synthesis that is unparalleled. In addition to reviewing recent interpretations of the individual traditions, he explores the interactions of the three religions and shows their continuing mutual influence to be subtle but unmistakable.
As in his previous work, Eliade pays particular attention to heresies, folk beliefs, and cults of secret wisdom, such as alchemy and sorcery, and continues the discussion, begun in earlier volumes, of pre-Christian shamanistic practices in northern Europe and the syncretistic tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. These subcultures, he maintains, are as important as the better-known orthodoxies to a full understanding of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

The Destiny of a King (Paperback, 2nd ed.): Georges Dumezil, Alf Hiltebeitel The Destiny of a King (Paperback, 2nd ed.)
Georges Dumezil, Alf Hiltebeitel
R658 Discovery Miles 6 580 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The preeminent scholar of comparative studies of Indo-European society, Georges Dumezil theorized that ancient and prehistoric Indo-European culture and literature revolved around three major functions: sovereignty, force, and fertility. This work treats these functions as they are articulated through "first king" legends found in Indian, Iranian, and Celtic epics, particularly the "Mahabharata," Dumezil, drawing on an extraordinarily broad range of Indo-European sources from Scandinavia to India and offering an original and provocative analytic method, set a new agenda for studies in comparative oral literature, historical linguistics, comparative mythology, and history of religions.
"The Destiny of a King" examines one of the "little" epics within the "Mahabharata"2;the legend of King Yayati, a distant ancestor of the Pandavas, the heroes of the larger epic. Dumezil compares Yayati's attributes and actions with those of the legendary Celtic king Eochaid Feidlech and also finds striking similarities in the stories surrounding the daughters of these two kings, the Indian Madhavi and the Celtic Medb. When he compares these two traditions with the "first king" legends from Iran, he finds such common themes as the apportionment of the earth and the "sin of the sovereign."

The Cult of Draupadi, v. 1 - Mythologies - From Gingee to Kuruksetra (Paperback, 1988-<1991): Alf Hiltebeitel The Cult of Draupadi, v. 1 - Mythologies - From Gingee to Kuruksetra (Paperback, 1988-<1991)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,244 Discovery Miles 12 440 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This is the first volume of a projected three-volume work on the little-known South Indian folk cult of the goddess Draupadi and on the classical epic, the "Mahabharata," that the cult brings to life in mythic, ritual, and dramatic forms. Draupadi, the chief heroine of the Sanskrit "Mahabharata," takes on many unexpected guises in her Tamil cult, but her dimensions as a folk goddess remain rooted in a rich interpretive vision of the great epic. By examining the ways that the cult of Draupadi commingles traditions about the goddess and the epic, Alf Hiltebeitel shows the cult to be singularly representative of the inner tensions and working dynamics of popular devotional Hinduism.

The Cult of Draupadi, v. 2 - On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess (Paperback, Revised edition): Alf Hiltebeitel The Cult of Draupadi, v. 2 - On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess (Paperback, Revised edition)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,248 Discovery Miles 12 480 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This is the first volume of a projected three-volume work on the little-known South Indian folk cult of the goddess Draupadi and on the classical epic, the "Mahabharata," that the cult brings to life in mythic, ritual, and dramatic forms. Draupadi, the chief heroine of the Sanskrit "Mahabharata," takes on many unexpected guises in her Tamil cult, but her dimensions as a folk goddess remain rooted in a rich interpretive vision of the great epic. By examining the ways that the cult of Draupadi commingles traditions about the goddess and the epic, Alf Hiltebeitel shows the cult to be singularly representative of the inner tensions and working dynamics of popular devotional Hinduism.

Rethinking the Mahabharata - A Reader's Guide to the Education of the Dharma King (Paperback, New): Alf Hiltebeitel Rethinking the Mahabharata - A Reader's Guide to the Education of the Dharma King (Paperback, New)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R824 Discovery Miles 8 240 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The ancient Indian Sanskrit tradition produced no text more intriguing, or more persistently misunderstood or underappreciated, than the Mahabharata. Its intricacies have waylaid generations of scholars and ignited dozens of unresolved debates. "In Rethinking the Mahabharata," Alf Hiltebeitel offers a unique model for understanding the great epic. Employing a wide range of literary and narrative theory, Hiltebeitel draws on historical and comparative research in an attempt to discern the spirit and techniques behind the epic's composition. He focuses on the education of Yudhisthira, also known as the Dharma King, and shows how the relationship of this figure to others-especially his author-grandfather Vyasa and his wife Draupadi-provides a thread through the bewildering array of frames and stories embedded within stories. Hiltebeitel also offers a revisionist theory regarding the dating and production of the original text and its relation to the Veda. No ordinary reader's guide, this volume will illuminate many mysteries of this enigmatic masterpiece.
This work is the fourth volume in Hiltebeitel's study of the Draupadi cult. Other volumes include "Mythologies: From Gingee to Kuruksetra" (Volume One), "On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess" (Volume Two), and "Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics" (Volume Three).

Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics - Draupadi among Rajputs, Muslims, and Dalits (Paperback, 2nd ed.): Alf... Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics - Draupadi among Rajputs, Muslims, and Dalits (Paperback, 2nd ed.)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,718 Discovery Miles 17 180 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Throughout India and Southeast Asia, ancient classical epics--the "Mahabharata" and the "Ramayana"--continue to exert considerable cultural influence. "Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics" offers an unprecedented exploration into South Asia's regional epic traditions.
Using his own fieldwork as a starting point, Alf Hiltebeitel analyzes how the oral tradition of the south Indian cult of the goddess Draupadi and five regional martial oral epics compare with one another and tie in with the Sanskrit epics. Drawing on literary theory and cultural studies, he reveals the shared subtexts of the Draupadi cult "Mahabharata" and the five oral epics, and shows how the traditional plots are twisted and classical characters reshaped to reflect local history and religion. In doing so, Hiltebeitel sheds new light on the intertwining oral traditions of medieval Rajput military culture, Dalits ("former Untouchables"), and Muslims.
Breathtaking in scope, this work is indispensable for those seeking a deeper understanding of South Asia's Hindu and Muslim traditions.
This work is the third volume in Hiltebeitel's study of the Draupadi cult. Other volumes include "Mythologies: From Gingee to Kuruksetra" (Volume One), "On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess" (Volume Two), and "Rethinking the Mahabharata" (Volume Four).

Freud's Mahabharata (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel Freud's Mahabharata (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,273 Discovery Miles 12 730 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Though Freud never overtly refers to the Mahabharata, many of the Sanskrit epic's themes are illuminated by Freud's thought and, conversely, many incidents in the epic can be used to illustrate Freud's theories. In Freud's Mahabharata, the companion volume to Freud's India, Alf Hiltebeitel offers what he calls a "pointillist introduction" to a new theory about the Mahabharata based on Freud. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of the preoedipal, along with Freud's discussion of burial alive, ghosts and doubles, and castration anxiety, and looks at parallels with Indian theories of karma and reincarnation. In Chapter 2 Hiltebeitel draws on Andre Green's concept of "the dead mother," alive but dead to her child, to tell the epic's main story through the interactions between the peace-loving King Yudhisthira and his bellicose mother Kunti. Chapter 3 takes up three "dead mother" stories in the Mahabharata's early books, all of them featuring Kunti, among a plethora of really dead or divine past mothers in the Pandava lineage. Next, Chapter 4 looks at Fernando Wulff Alonso's hypothesis that the Mahabharata poets worked from Greek sources in modeling their stories. Hiltebeitel explores the epic's divine plan of the unburdening of the Earth, the goddess Earth, and its Greek counterpart in the Iliad's plan of Zeus. Girindrasekhar Bose's concept of the "Oedipus mother" is introduced in Chapter 5 through a discussion of Aravan, a minor figure throughout the Sanskrit epic tradition but one who looms in importance in the Draupadi cult and has a cult of his own, where he is called Kuttantavar. In both cults Aravan is worshiped for his self-mutilating sacrifice as a battle-opening offering to "mother" Kali, and he is worshipped in his own cult by Indian eunuchs or castrati called Aravanis in his honor. The book concludes with a new theory of the epic based on Freud's Moses and Monotheism, in which he argued that religious traditions deserve to be studied not only in what they say consciously about themselves, but in what they have registered unconsciously from past traumas, loss of memory, and the return of the repressed.

The Ritual of Battle - Krishna in the Mahabharata (Paperback, New edition): Alf Hiltebeitel The Ritual of Battle - Krishna in the Mahabharata (Paperback, New edition)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R733 Discovery Miles 7 330 Ships in 10 - 15 working days
Nonviolence in the Mahabharata - Siva's Summa on Rishidharma and the Gleaners of Kurukshetra (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel Nonviolence in the Mahabharata - Siva's Summa on Rishidharma and the Gleaners of Kurukshetra (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R3,748 Discovery Miles 37 480 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In Indian mythological texts like the Mahabharata and Ramayana, there are recurrent tales about gleaners. The practice of "gleaning" in India had more to do with the house-less forest life than with residential village or urban life or with gathering residual post-harvest grains from cultivated fields. Gleaning can be seen a metaphor for the Mahabharata poets' art: an art that could have included their manner of gleaning what they made the leftovers (what they found useful) from many preexistent texts into Vyasa's "entire thought"-including oral texts and possibly written ones, such as philosophical debates and stories. This book explores the notion of non-violence in the epic Mahabharata. In examining gleaning as an ecological and spiritual philosophy nurtured as much by hospitality codes as by eating practices, the author analyses the merits and limitations of the 9th century Kashmiri aesthetician Anandavardhana that the dominant aesthetic sentiment or rasa of the Mahabharata is shanta (peace). Mahatma Gandhi's non-violent reading of the Mahabharata via the Bhagavad Gita are also studied. This book by one of the leaders in Mahabharata studies is of interest to scholars of South Asian Literary Studies, Religious Studies as well as Peace Studies, South Asian Anthropology and History.

Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics - Draupadi among Rajputs, Muslims, and Dalits (Hardcover, New): Alf Hiltebeitel Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics - Draupadi among Rajputs, Muslims, and Dalits (Hardcover, New)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R2,131 Discovery Miles 21 310 Out of stock

Throughout India and Southeast Asia, ancient classical epics--the "Mahabharata" and the "Ramayana"--continue to exert considerable cultural influence. "Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics" offers an unprecedented exploration into South Asia's regional epic traditions.
Using his own fieldwork as a starting point, Alf Hiltebeitel analyzes how the oral tradition of the south Indian cult of the goddess Draupadi and five regional martial oral epics compare with one another and tie in with the Sanskrit epics. Drawing on literary theory and cultural studies, he reveals the shared subtexts of the Draupadi cult "Mahabharata" and the five oral epics, and shows how the traditional plots are twisted and classical characters reshaped to reflect local history and religion. In doing so, Hiltebeitel sheds new light on the intertwining oral traditions of medieval Rajput military culture, Dalits ("former Untouchables"), and Muslims.
Breathtaking in scope, this work is indispensable for those seeking a deeper understanding of South Asia's Hindu and Muslim traditions.
This work is the third volume in Hiltebeitel's study of the Draupadi cult. Other volumes include "Mythologies: From Gingee to Kuruksetra" (Volume One), "On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess" (Volume Two), and "Rethinking the Mahabharata" (Volume Four).

Rethinking the Mahabharata - A Reader's Guide to the Education of the Dharma King (Hardcover, New): Alf Hiltebeitel Rethinking the Mahabharata - A Reader's Guide to the Education of the Dharma King (Hardcover, New)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,987 Discovery Miles 19 870 Out of stock

The ancient Indian Sanskrit tradition produced no text more intriguing, or more persistently misunderstood or underappreciated, than the Mahabharata. Its intricacies have waylaid generations of scholars and ignited dozens of unresolved debates. "In Rethinking the Mahabharata," Alf Hiltebeitel offers a unique model for understanding the great epic. Employing a wide range of literary and narrative theory, Hiltebeitel draws on historical and comparative research in an attempt to discern the spirit and techniques behind the epic's composition. He focuses on the education of Yudhisthira, also known as the Dharma King, and shows how the relationship of this figure to others-especially his author-grandfather Vyasa and his wife Draupadi-provides a thread through the bewildering array of frames and stories embedded within stories. Hiltebeitel also offers a revisionist theory regarding the dating and production of the original text and its relation to the Veda. No ordinary reader's guide, this volume will illuminate many mysteries of this enigmatic masterpiece.
This work is the fourth volume in Hiltebeitel's study of the Draupadi cult. Other volumes include "Mythologies: From Gingee to Kuruksetra" (Volume One), "On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess" (Volume Two), and "Rethinking India's Oral and Classical Epics" (Volume Three).

The Cult of Draupadi, v. 1 - Mythologies - From Gingee to Kuruksetra (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel The Cult of Draupadi, v. 1 - Mythologies - From Gingee to Kuruksetra (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R4,074 Discovery Miles 40 740 Out of stock

This is the first volume of a projected three-volume work on the little-known South Indian folk cult of the goddess Draupadi and on the classical epic, the "Mahabharata," that the cult brings to life in mythic, ritual, and dramatic forms. Draupadi, the chief heroine of the Sanskrit "Mahabharata," takes on many unexpected guises in her Tamil cult, but her dimensions as a folk goddess remain rooted in a rich interpretive vision of the great epic. By examining the ways that the cult of Draupadi commingles traditions about the goddess and the epic, Alf Hiltebeitel shows the cult to be singularly representative of the inner tensions and working dynamics of popular devotional Hinduism.

The Cult of Draupadi, v. 2 - On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess (Hardcover, New): Alf Hiltebeitel The Cult of Draupadi, v. 2 - On Hindu Ritual and the Goddess (Hardcover, New)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R3,922 Discovery Miles 39 220 Out of stock

This is the first volume of a projected three-volume work on the little-known South Indian folk cult of the goddess Draupadi and on the classical epic, the "Mahabharata," that the cult brings to life in mythic, ritual, and dramatic forms. Draupadi, the chief heroine of the Sanskrit "Mahabharata," takes on many unexpected guises in her Tamil cult, but her dimensions as a folk goddess remain rooted in a rich interpretive vision of the great epic. By examining the ways that the cult of Draupadi commingles traditions about the goddess and the epic, Alf Hiltebeitel shows the cult to be singularly representative of the inner tensions and working dynamics of popular devotional Hinduism.

Nonviolence in the Mahabharata - Siva's Summa on Rishidharma and the Gleaners of Kurukshetra (Paperback): Alf Hiltebeitel Nonviolence in the Mahabharata - Siva's Summa on Rishidharma and the Gleaners of Kurukshetra (Paperback)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,051 Discovery Miles 10 510 Out of stock

In Indian mythological texts like the Mahabharata and Ramayana, there are recurrent tales about gleaners. The practice of "gleaning" in India had more to do with the house-less forest life than with residential village or urban life or with gathering residual post-harvest grains from cultivated fields. Gleaning can be seen a metaphor for the Mahabharata poets' art: an art that could have included their manner of gleaning what they made the leftovers (what they found useful) from many preexistent texts into Vyasa's "entire thought"-including oral texts and possibly written ones, such as philosophical debates and stories. This book explores the notion of non-violence in the epic Mahabharata. In examining gleaning as an ecological and spiritual philosophy nurtured as much by hospitality codes as by eating practices, the author analyses the merits and limitations of the 9th century Kashmiri aesthetician Anandavardhana that the dominant aesthetic sentiment or rasa of the Mahabharata is shanta (peace). Mahatma Gandhi's non-violent reading of the Mahabharata via the Bhagavad Gita are also studied. This book by one of the leaders in Mahabharata studies is of interest to scholars of South Asian Literary Studies, Religious Studies as well as Peace Studies, South Asian Anthropology and History.

Dharma - Its Early History in Law, Religion, and Narrative (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel Dharma - Its Early History in Law, Religion, and Narrative (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R2,188 Discovery Miles 21 880 Out of stock

Between 300 BCE and 200 CE, concepts and practices of dharma attained literary prominence throughout India. Both Buddhist and Brahmanical authors sought to clarify and classify their central concerns, and dharma proved a means of thinking through and articulating those concerns.
Alf Hiltebeitel shows the different ways in which dharma was interpreted during that formative period: from the grand cosmic chronometries of kalpas and yugas to narratives about divine plans, gendered nuances of genealogical time, royal biography (even autobiography, in the case of the emperor Asoka), and guidelines for daily life, including meditation. He reveals the vital role dharma has played across political, religious, legal, literary, ethical, and philosophical domains and discourses about what holds life together. Through dharma, these traditions have articulated their distinct visions of the good and well-rewarded life.
This insightful study explores the diverse and changing significance of dharma in classical India in nine major dharma texts, as well some shorter ones. Dharma proves to be a term by which to make a fresh cut through these texts, and to reconsider their own chronology, their import, and their relation to each other.

Criminal Gods and Demon Devotees - Essays on the Guardians of Popular Hinduism (Paperback): Alf Hiltebeitel Criminal Gods and Demon Devotees - Essays on the Guardians of Popular Hinduism (Paperback)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R827 Discovery Miles 8 270 Out of stock
Hair - Its Power and Meaning in Asian Cultures (Hardcover, New): Alf Hiltebeitel, Barbara D. Miller Hair - Its Power and Meaning in Asian Cultures (Hardcover, New)
Alf Hiltebeitel, Barbara D. Miller; Foreword by Gananath Obeyesekere
R2,083 Discovery Miles 20 830 Out of stock

Hair - whether present or absent, restored or removed, abundant or scarce, long or short, bound or unbound, colored or natural - marks a person as clearly as speech, clothing, and smell. While hair's high salience as both sign and symbol extends cross-culturally through time, its denotations are far from universal. Hair is an inter-disciplinary look at the meanings of hair, hairiness, and hairlessness in Asian cultures, from classical to contemporary contexts. The contributors draw on a variety of literary, archaeological, religious, and ethnographic evidence. They examine scientific, medical, political, and popular cultural discourses. Topics covered include monastic communities and communities of fashion, hair codes and social conventions of rank, attitudes of enforcement and rebellion, and positions of privilege and destitution. Different interpretations include hair as a key aspect of female beauty, of virility, as obscene, as impure, and linked with other symbolic markers in bodily, social, political, and cosmological constructs.

Hair - Its Power and Meaning in Asian Cultures (Paperback): Alf Hiltebeitel, Barbara D. Miller Hair - Its Power and Meaning in Asian Cultures (Paperback)
Alf Hiltebeitel, Barbara D. Miller; Foreword by Gananath Obeyesekere
R787 Discovery Miles 7 870 Out of stock

Hair - whether present or absent, restored or removed, abundant or scarce, long or short, bound or unbound, colored or natural - marks a person as clearly as speech, clothing, and smell. While hair's high salience as both sign and symbol extends cross-culturally through time, its denotations are far from universal. Hair is an inter-disciplinary look at the meanings of hair, hairiness, and hairlessness in Asian cultures, from classical to contemporary contexts. The contributors draw on a variety of literary, archaeological, religious, and ethnographic evidence. They examine scientific, medical, political, and popular cultural discourses. Topics covered include monastic communities and communities of fashion, hair codes and social conventions of rank, attitudes of enforcement and rebellion, and positions of privilege and destitution. Different interpretations include hair as a key aspect of female beauty, of virility, as obscene, as impure, and linked with other symbolic markers in bodily, social, political, and cosmological constructs.

Ritual of Battle - Krishna in the "Mahabharata" (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel Ritual of Battle - Krishna in the "Mahabharata" (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R2,074 Discovery Miles 20 740 Out of stock
English-Tahitian, Tahitian-English Dictionary (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel English-Tahitian, Tahitian-English Dictionary (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,530 Discovery Miles 15 300 Out of stock

This is the most useful and comprehensive English-Tahitian, Tahitian-English dictionary available. The author, who was a devoted student of Tahitian for more than three decades, provides an extensive introduction to the language with detailed notes on grammar, usage, and pronunciation. This reprint edition has been re-sized to 6 inches x 9.25 inches, making it a convenient and handier alternative to larger-sized dictionaries.

Freud's India - Sigmund Freud and India's First Psychoanalyst Girindrasekhar Bose (Hardcover): Alf Hiltebeitel Freud's India - Sigmund Freud and India's First Psychoanalyst Girindrasekhar Bose (Hardcover)
Alf Hiltebeitel
R1,821 Discovery Miles 18 210 Out of stock

The sharp contrast between cultures with a monotheistic paternal deity and those with pluralistic maternal deities is a theme of abiding interest in religious studies. Attempts to understand the implications of these two vast organizing principles for religious life lead to an overwhelmingly diverse set of facts and their meanings. In Freud's India, the companion volume to Freud's Mahabharata, Alf Hiltebeitel takes up this enormously engaging question, focusing on the thinking of two spokespeople for the inner life of their cultures- Sigmund Freud and Girindrasekhar Bose. Hiltebeitel examines the attempts of these two men to communicate with and understand each other and these issues in the heated context of emotionally divisive allegiances. The book is elegant in its nuanced attention to these two thinkers and its tightly controlled exploration of what their interactions reveal about their contributions and limitations as representatives of the psychology and religion of their respective cultures. Anxieties about mothers, says Hiltebeitel, separate Eastern from Western imaginations. They separate Freud from Bose, and they separate Hindu foundational texts from the foundational texts of Judaism.

Free Delivery
Pinterest Twitter Facebook Google+
You may like...
Rexel Optima Document Wallet (A4)(Blue)
R28 Discovery Miles 280
Lord You Are Good
Rebecca Malope CD R109 Discovery Miles 1 090
Crayola Erasable Twistable Pencil…
R100 Discovery Miles 1 000
Simply Child Hot Air Balloon Mobile…
R390 Discovery Miles 3 900
Not available
About Financial Accounting: Volume 1
Paperback  (4)
R918 R749 Discovery Miles 7 490
Casio LW-200-7AV Watch with 10-Year…
R899 R765 Discovery Miles 7 650
JBL C100SI Headset In-ear Black
 (3)
R149 R129 Discovery Miles 1 290
Bantex B8690 Paper Clips (30mm)
R11 Discovery Miles 110
Voel Jy Die Genade
Jo Black CD R120 R109 Discovery Miles 1 090

 

Partners