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Encounters with Euclid - How an Ancient Greek Geometry Text Shaped the World (Paperback): Benjamin Wardhaugh Encounters with Euclid - How an Ancient Greek Geometry Text Shaped the World (Paperback)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R227 Discovery Miles 2 270 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

'An astonishingly readable and informative history of the greatest mathematical bestseller of all time ... The writing is vivid and the stories are gripping. Highly recommended ' IAN STEWART, AUTHOR OF SIGNIFICANT FIGURES Euclid's Elements of Geometry was a book that changed the world. In this sweeping history, Benjamin Wardhaugh traces how the ancient Greek text on mathematics - often hailed as the world's first textbook - shaped two thousand years of art, philosophy and literature, as well as science and maths. With stories of influence on every continent, and encounters with the likes of Ptolemy and Isaac Newton, Hobbes and Lewis Carroll, Wardhaugh gives dramatic life to the evolution of mathematics. Previously published as The Book of Wonders

Encounters with Euclid - How an Ancient Greek Geometry Text Shaped the World (Hardcover): Benjamin Wardhaugh Encounters with Euclid - How an Ancient Greek Geometry Text Shaped the World (Hardcover)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R666 R559 Discovery Miles 5 590 Save R107 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

A sweeping cultural history of one of the most influential mathematical books ever written Euclid's Elements of Geometry is one of the fountainheads of mathematics-and of culture. Written around 300 BCE, it has traveled widely across the centuries, generating countless new ideas and inspiring such figures as Isaac Newton, Bertrand Russell, Abraham Lincoln, and Albert Einstein. Encounters with Euclid tells the story of this incomparable mathematical masterpiece, taking readers from its origins in the ancient world to its continuing influence today. In this lively and informative book, Benjamin Wardhaugh explains how Euclid's text journeyed from antiquity to the Renaissance, introducing some of the many readers, copyists, and editors who left their mark on the Elements before handing it on. He shows how some read the book as a work of philosophy, while others viewed it as a practical guide to life. He examines the many different contexts in which Euclid's book and his geometry were put to use, from the Neoplatonic school at Athens and the artisans' studios of medieval Baghdad to the Jesuit mission in China and the workshops of Restoration London. Wardhaugh shows how the Elements inspired ideas in theology, art, and music, and how the book has acquired new relevance to the strange geometries of dark matter and curved space. Encounters with Euclid traces the life and afterlives of one of the most remarkable works of mathematics ever written, revealing its lasting role in the timeless search for order and reason in an unruly world.

The Book of Wonders - The Many Lives of Euclid's Elements (Hardcover): Benjamin Wardhaugh The Book of Wonders - The Many Lives of Euclid's Elements (Hardcover)
Benjamin Wardhaugh 1
R490 Discovery Miles 4 900 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Euclid's Elements of Geometry was a book that changed the world. In a sweeping history, Benjamin Wardhaugh traces how an ancient Greek text on mathematics - often hailed as the world's first textbook - shaped two thousand years of art, philosophy and literature, as well as science and maths. Thirteen volumes of mathematical definitions, propositions and proofs. Writing in 300 BC, Euclid could not have known his logic would go unsurpassed until the nineteenth century, or that his writings were laying down the very foundations of human knowledge. Wardhaugh blasts the dust from Euclid's legacy to offer not only a vibrant history of mathematics, told through people and invention, but also a broader story of culture. Telling stories from every continent, ranging between Ptolemy and Isaac Newton, Hobbes and Lewis Carrol, this is a history that dives from Ancient Greece to medieval Byzantium, early modern China, Renaissance Italy, the age of European empires, and our world today. How has geometry sat at the beating heart of sculpture, literature, music and thought? How can one unknowable figure of antiquity live through two millennia?

John Wallis: Writings on Music (Paperback): Benjamin Wardhaugh John Wallis: Writings on Music (Paperback)
Benjamin Wardhaugh; Edited by David Cram
R1,002 Discovery Miles 10 020 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

John Wallis (1616-1703), was one of the foremost British mathematicians of the seventeenth century, and is also remembered for his important writings on grammar and logic. An interest in music theory led him to produce translations into Latin of three ancient Greek texts - those of Ptolemy, Porphyry and Bryennius - and involved him in discussions with Henry Oldenburg, the Secretary of the Royal Society, Thomas Salmon and other individuals as his ideas developed. The texts presented in this volume cover the relationship of ancient and modern tuning theory, the building of organs, the phenomena of resonance, and other musical topics.

Reading Mathematics in Early Modern Europe - Studies in the Production, Collection, and Use of Mathematical Books (Hardcover):... Reading Mathematics in Early Modern Europe - Studies in the Production, Collection, and Use of Mathematical Books (Hardcover)
Philip Beeley, Yelda Nasifoglu, Benjamin Wardhaugh
R3,081 Discovery Miles 30 810 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Libraries and archives contain many thousands of early modern mathematical books, of which almost equally many bear readers' marks, ranging from deliberate annotations and accidental blots to corrections and underlinings. Such evidence provides us with the material and intellectual tools for exploring the nature of mathematical reading and the ways in which mathematics was disseminated and assimilated across different social milieus in the early centuries of print culture. Other evidence is important, too, as the case studies collected in the volume document. Scholarly correspondence can help us understand the motives and difficulties in producing new printed texts, library catalogues can illuminate collection practices, while manuscripts can teach us more about textual traditions. By defining and illuminating the distinctive world of early modern mathematical reading, the volume seeks to close the gap between the history of mathematics as a history of texts and history of mathematics as part of the broader history of human culture.

Thomas Salmon: Writings on Music - Volume II: A Proposal to Perform Musick and Related Writings, 1685-1706 (Hardcover, New Ed):... Thomas Salmon: Writings on Music - Volume II: A Proposal to Perform Musick and Related Writings, 1685-1706 (Hardcover, New Ed)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R3,209 Discovery Miles 32 090 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

This is the second volume in a two-part set on the writings of Thomas Salmon. Salmon (1647-1706) is remembered today for the fury with which Matthew Locke greeted his first foray into musical writing, the Essay to the Advancement of Musick (1672), and the near-farcical level to which the subsequent pamphlet dispute quickly descended. Salmon proposed a radical reform of musical notation, involving a new set of clefs which he claimed, and Locke denied, would make learning and performing music much easier (these writings are the subject of Volume I). Later in his life Salmon devoted his attention to an exploration of the possible reform of musical pitch. He made or renewed contact with instrument-makers and performers in London, with the mathematician John Wallis, with Isaac Newton and with the Royal Society of London through its Secretary Hans Sloane. A series of manuscript treatises and a published Proposal to Perform Musick, in Perfect and Mathematical Proportions (1688) paved the way for an appearance by Salmon at the Royal Society in 1705, when he provided a demonstration performance by professional musicians using instruments specially modified to his designs. This created an explicit overlap between the spaces of musical performance and of experimental performance, as well as raising questions about the meaning and the source of musical knowledge similar to those raised in his work on notation. Benjamin Wardhaugh presents the first published scholarly edition of Salmon's writings on pitch, previously only available mostly in manuscript.

John Birchensha: Writings on Music (Paperback): Christopher D. S. Field, Benjamin Wardhaugh John Birchensha: Writings on Music (Paperback)
Christopher D. S. Field, Benjamin Wardhaugh
R1,201 Discovery Miles 12 010 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

John Birchensha (c.1605-?1681) is chiefly remembered for the impression that his theories about music made on the mathematicians, natural philosophers and virtuosi of the Royal Society in the 1660s and 1670s, and for inventing a system that he claimed would enable even those without practical experience of music to learn to compose in a short time by means of 'a few easy, certain, and perfect Rules'-his most famous composition pupil being Samuel Pepys in 1662. His great aim was to publish a treatise on music in its philosophical, mathematical and practical aspects (which would have included a definitive summary of his rules of composition), entitled Syntagma musicA|. Subscriptions for this book were invited in 1672-3, and it was due to be published by March 1675; but it never appeared, and no final manuscript of it survives. Consequently knowledge about his work has hitherto remained extremely sketchy. Recent research, however, has brought to light a number of manuscripts which allow us at last to form a more complete view of Birchensha's ideas. Almost none of this material has been previously published. The new items include an autograph treatise of c.1664 ('A Compendious Discourse of the Principles of the Practicall & Mathematicall Partes of Musick') which Birchensha presented to the natural philosopher Robert Boyle, and which covers concisely much of the ground that he intended to cover in Syntagma musicA|; a detailed synopsis for Syntagma musicA| which he prepared for a meeting of the Royal Society in February 1676; and an autograph notebook (now in Brussels) containing his six rules of composition with music examples, presumably written for a pupil. Bringing all this material together in a single volume will allow scholars to see how Birchensha's rules and theories developed over a period of fifteen years, and to gain at least a flavour of the lost Syntagma musicA|.

John Wallis: Writings on Music (Hardcover, New Ed): Benjamin Wardhaugh John Wallis: Writings on Music (Hardcover, New Ed)
Benjamin Wardhaugh; Edited by David Cram
R3,215 Discovery Miles 32 150 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

John Wallis (1616-1703), was one of the foremost British mathematicians of the seventeenth century, and is also remembered for his important writings on grammar and logic. An interest in music theory led him to produce translations into Latin of three ancient Greek texts - those of Ptolemy, Porphyry and Bryennius - and involved him in discussions with Henry Oldenburg, the Secretary of the Royal Society, Thomas Salmon and other individuals as his ideas developed. The texts presented in this volume cover the relationship of ancient and modern tuning theory, the building of organs, the phenomena of resonance, and other musical topics.

Thomas Salmon: Writings on Music - Volume I: An Essay to the Advancement of Musick and the Ensuing Controversy, 1672-3... Thomas Salmon: Writings on Music - Volume I: An Essay to the Advancement of Musick and the Ensuing Controversy, 1672-3 (Hardcover, New Ed)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R3,219 Discovery Miles 32 190 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Thomas Salmon (1647-1706) is remembered today for the fury with which Matthew Locke greeted his first foray into musical writing, the Essay to the Advancement of Musick (1672), and the near-farcical level to which the subsequent pamphlet dispute quickly descended. Salmon proposed a radical reform of musical notation, involving a new set of clefs which he claimed, and Locke denied, would make learning and performing music much easier. The incident has tended to be passed over rather briefly in the scholarly literature, but beneath the unedifying invective employed by Salmon, Locke and their supporters, serious and novel statements were being made about what constituted musical knowledge and what was the proper way to acquire it. This volume is the first published scholarly edition of Salmon's writings on notation, previously available only in microfilm and online facsimiles. A second volume to follow will present Salmon's writings on pitch - previously only available mostly in manuscript.

John Birchensha: Writings on Music (Hardcover, New Ed): Christopher D. S. Field, Benjamin Wardhaugh John Birchensha: Writings on Music (Hardcover, New Ed)
Christopher D. S. Field, Benjamin Wardhaugh
R3,206 Discovery Miles 32 060 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

John Birchensha (c.1605-?1681) is chiefly remembered for the impression that his theories about music made on the mathematicians, natural philosophers and virtuosi of the Royal Society in the 1660s and 1670s, and for inventing a system that he claimed would enable even those without practical experience of music to learn to compose in a short time by means of 'a few easy, certain, and perfect Rules'-his most famous composition pupil being Samuel Pepys in 1662. His great aim was to publish a treatise on music in its philosophical, mathematical and practical aspects (which would have included a definitive summary of his rules of composition), entitled Syntagma musicA|. Subscriptions for this book were invited in 1672-3, and it was due to be published by March 1675; but it never appeared, and no final manuscript of it survives. Consequently knowledge about his work has hitherto remained extremely sketchy. Recent research, however, has brought to light a number of manuscripts which allow us at last to form a more complete view of Birchensha's ideas. Almost none of this material has been previously published. The new items include an autograph treatise of c.1664 ('A Compendious Discourse of the Principles of the Practicall & Mathematicall Partes of Musick') which Birchensha presented to the natural philosopher Robert Boyle, and which covers concisely much of the ground that he intended to cover in Syntagma musicA|; a detailed synopsis for Syntagma musicA| which he prepared for a meeting of the Royal Society in February 1676; and an autograph notebook (now in Brussels) containing his six rules of composition with music examples, presumably written for a pupil. Bringing all this material together in a single volume will allow scholars to see how Birchensha's rules and theories developed over a period of fifteen years, and to gain at least a flavour of the lost Syntagma musicA|.

Music, Experiment and Mathematics in England, 1653-1705 (Hardcover, New Ed): Benjamin Wardhaugh Music, Experiment and Mathematics in England, 1653-1705 (Hardcover, New Ed)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R3,341 Discovery Miles 33 410 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

How, in 1705, was Thomas Salmon, a parson from Bedfordshire, able to persuade the Royal Society that a musical performance could constitute a scientific experiment? Or that the judgement of a musical audience could provide evidence for a mathematically precise theory of musical tuning? This book presents answers to these questions. It constitutes a general history of quantitative music theory in the late seventeenth century as well as a detailed study of one part of that history: namely the applications of mathematical and mechanical methods of understanding to music that were produced in England between 1653 and 1705, beginning with the responses to Descartes's 1650 Compendium musicA|, and ending with the Philosophical Transactions' account of the appearance of Thomas Salmon at the Royal Society in 1705. The book is organized around four key questions. Do musical pitches form a small set or a continuous spectrum? Is there a single faculty of hearing which can account for musical sensation, or is more than one faculty at work? What is the role of harmony in the mechanical world, and where can its effects be found? And what is the relationship between musical theory and musical practice? These are questions which are raised and discussed in the sources themselves, and they have wide significance for early modern theories of knowledge and sensation more generally, as well as providing a fascinating side light onto the world of the scientific revolution.

Gunpowder and Geometry - The Life of Charles Hutton: Pit Boy, Mathematician and Scientific Rebel (Paperback): Benjamin Wardhaugh Gunpowder and Geometry - The Life of Charles Hutton: Pit Boy, Mathematician and Scientific Rebel (Paperback)
Benjamin Wardhaugh 1
R208 Discovery Miles 2 080 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

August, 1755. Newcastle, on the north bank of the Tyne. In the fields, men and women are getting the harvest in. Sunlight, or rain. Scudding clouds and backbreaking labour. Three hundred feet underground, young Charles Hutton is at the coalface. Cramped, dust-choked, wielding a five-pound pick by candlelight. Eighteen years old, he's been down the pits on and off for more than a decade, and now it looks like a life sentence. No unusual story, although Charles is a clever lad - gifted at maths and languages - and for a time he hoped for a different life. Many hoped. Charles Hutton, astonishingly, would actually live the life he dreamed of. Twenty years later you'd have found him in Slaughter's coffee house in London, eating a few oysters with the President of the Royal Society. By the time he died, in 1823, he was a fellow of scientific academies in four countries, while the Lord Chancellor of England counted himself fortunate to have known him. Hard work, talent, and no small share of luck would take Charles Hutton out of the pit to international fame, wealth, admiration and happiness. The pit-boy turned professor would become one of the most revered British scientists of his day. This book is his incredible story.

How to Read Historical Mathematics (Hardcover): Benjamin Wardhaugh How to Read Historical Mathematics (Hardcover)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R805 R628 Discovery Miles 6 280 Save R177 (22%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Writings by early mathematicians feature language and notations that are quite different from what we're familiar with today. Sourcebooks on the history of mathematics provide some guidance, but what has been lacking is a guide tailored to the needs of readers approaching these writings for the first time. "How to Read Historical Mathematics" fills this gap by introducing readers to the analytical questions historians ask when deciphering historical texts.

Sampling actual writings from the history of mathematics, Benjamin Wardhaugh reveals the questions that will unlock the meaning and significance of a given text--Who wrote it, why, and for whom? What was its author's intended meaning? How did it reach its present form? Is it original or a translation? Why is it important today? Wardhaugh teaches readers to think about what the original text might have looked like, to consider where and when it was written, and to formulate questions of their own. Readers pick up new skills with each chapter, and gain the confidence and analytical sophistication needed to tackle virtually any text in the history of mathematics.Introduces readers to the methods of textual analysis used by historians Uses actual source material as examples Features boxed summaries, discussion questions, and suggestions for further reading Supplements all major sourcebooks in mathematics history Designed for easy reference Ideal for students and teachers

The History of the History of Mathematics - Case Studies for the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (Paperback,... The History of the History of Mathematics - Case Studies for the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (Paperback, New edition)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R941 R868 Discovery Miles 8 680 Save R73 (8%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

The writing of mathematical histories has a long history, one which has seldom received scholarly attention. Mathematical history, and mathematical biography, raise distinctive issues of method and approach to which different periods have responded in different ways. At a time of increasing interest in the history of mathematics, this book attempts to show something of the trajectory that history has taken in the past. It presents seven case studies illustrating the different ways that mathematical histories have been written since the seventeenth century, ranging from the 'historia' of John Wallis to the recent re-presentation of Thomas Harriot's manuscripts online. It considers both the ways that individual reputations and biographies have been shaped differently in different circumstances, and the ways that the discipline of mathematics has itself been variously presented through the writing of its history.

The Correspondence of Charles Hutton - Mathematical Networks in Georgian Britain (Hardcover): Benjamin Wardhaugh The Correspondence of Charles Hutton - Mathematical Networks in Georgian Britain (Hardcover)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R2,289 Discovery Miles 22 890 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

This book contains all the letters that are known to survive from the correspondence of Charles Hutton (1737-1823). Hutton was one of the most prominent British mathematicians of his generation; he played roles at the Royal Society, the Royal Military Academy, the Board of Longitude, the 'philomath' network and elsewhere. He worked on the explosive force of gunpowder and the mean density of the earth, wining the Royal Society's Copley medal in 1778; he was also at the focus of a celebrated row at the Royal Society in 1784 over the place of mathematics there. He is of particular historical interest because of the variety of roles he played in British mathematics, the dexterity with which he navigated, exploited and shaped personal and professional networks in mathematics and science, and the length and visibility of his career. Hutton corresponded nationally and internationally, and his correspondence illustrates the overlapping, the intersection and interaction of the different networks in which Hutton moved. It therefore provides new information about how Georgian mathematics was structured socially, and how mathematical careers worked in that period. It provides a rare and valuable view of a mathematical culture that would substantially cease to exist when British mathematics embraced continental methods from the early ninetheenth century onwards. Over 130 letters survive, from 1770 to 1822, but they are widely scattered (in nearly thirty different archives) and have not been catalogued or edited before. This edition situates the correspondence with an introduction and explanatory notes.

Thomas Salmon: Writings on Music - Two volume set (Hardcover, New edition): Benjamin Wardhaugh Thomas Salmon: Writings on Music - Two volume set (Hardcover, New edition)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R2,955 Discovery Miles 29 550 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Thomas Salmon (1647-1706) is remembered today for the fury with which Matthew Locke greeted his first foray into musical writing, the Essay to the Advancement of Musick (1672), and the near-farcical level to which the subsequent pamphlet dispute quickly descended. Salmon proposed a radical reform of musical notation, involving a new set of clefs which he claimed, and Locke denied, would make learning and performing music much easier (these writings are the subject of Volume I). The incident has tended to be passed over rather briefly in the scholarly literature, but beneath the unedifying invective employed by Salmon, Locke and their supporters, serious and novel statements were being made about what constituted musical knowledge and what was the proper way to acquire it. Later in his life Salmon devoted his attention to an exploration of the possible reform of musical pitch. He made or renewed contact with instrument-makers and performers in London, with the mathematician John Wallis, with Isaac Newton and with the Royal Society of London through its Secretary Hans Sloane. A series of manuscript treatises and a published Proposal to Perform Musick, in Perfect and Mathematical Proportions (1688) paved the way for an appearance by Salmon at the Royal Society in 1705, when he provided a demonstration performance by professional musicians using instruments specially modified to his designs (these writings are the subject of Volume II). This created an explicit overlap between the spaces of musical performance and of experimental performance, as well as raising questions about the meaning and the source of musical knowledge similar to those raised in his work on notation. In this two-volume set, Benjamin Wardhaugh presents the first published scholarly edition of Salmon's writings, previously available only in microfilm and online facsimiles.

A Wealth of Numbers - An Anthology of 500 Years of Popular Mathematics Writing (Hardcover): Benjamin Wardhaugh A Wealth of Numbers - An Anthology of 500 Years of Popular Mathematics Writing (Hardcover)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R1,180 R924 Discovery Miles 9 240 Save R256 (22%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Despite what we may sometimes imagine, popular mathematics writing didn't begin with Martin Gardner. In fact, it has a rich tradition stretching back hundreds of years. This entertaining and enlightening anthology--the first of its kind--gathers nearly one hundred fascinating selections from the past 500 years of popular math writing, bringing to life a little-known side of math history. Ranging from the late fifteenth to the late twentieth century, and drawing from books, newspapers, magazines, and websites, "A Wealth of Numbers" includes recreational, classroom, and work mathematics; mathematical histories and biographies; accounts of higher mathematics; explanations of mathematical instruments; discussions of how math should be taught and learned; reflections on the place of math in the world; and math in fiction and humor.

Featuring many tricks, games, problems, and puzzles, as well as much history and trivia, the selections include a sixteenth-century guide to making a horizontal sundial; "Newton for the Ladies" (1739); Leonhard Euler on the idea of velocity (1760); "Mathematical Toys" (1785); a poetic version of the rule of three (1792); "Lotteries and Mountebanks" (1801); Lewis Carroll on the game of logic (1887); "Maps and Mazes" (1892); "Einstein's Real Achievement" (1921); "Riddles in Mathematics" (1945); "New Math for Parents" (1966); and "PC Astronomy" (1997). Organized by thematic chapters, each selection is placed in context by a brief introduction.

A unique window into the hidden history of popular mathematics, "A Wealth of Numbers" will provide many hours of fun and learning to anyone who loves popular mathematics and science.

The Compendium Musicae of Rene Descartes - Early English Responses (Hardcover): Benjamin Wardhaugh The Compendium Musicae of Rene Descartes - Early English Responses (Hardcover)
Benjamin Wardhaugh
R2,772 Discovery Miles 27 720 Out of stock

Rene Descartes's Compendium musicAe was one of the most widely-read texts on the mathematics of music in the second half of the seventeenth century, offering a succinct and lucid summary of its subject. It was translated into English, French and Dutch before the end of the century--though its idiosyncratic geometrical approach to music drew criticism as well as praise--and its sophisticated mathematical thinking attracted a number of later scholars to explore its ideas further in print or manuscript. This volume presents for the first time a critical edition of the English translation of the Compendium, published in 1653 by the natural philosopher Walter Charleton. Also included are the unpublished manuscript treatises written by Nicolaus Mercator and Isaac Newton developing similar ideas to those in the Compendium, and the printed remarks of William Brouncker which appeared with Charleton's translation. This rich collection of texts, most of them appearing in critical editions for the first time, provides a unique view of the early reception of Descartes's musical treatise in England.

Gunpowder and Geometry - The Life of Charles Hutton, Pit Boy, Mathematician and Scientific Rebel (Hardcover): Benjamin Wardhaugh Gunpowder and Geometry - The Life of Charles Hutton, Pit Boy, Mathematician and Scientific Rebel (Hardcover)
Benjamin Wardhaugh 1
R510 R406 Discovery Miles 4 060 Save R104 (20%) Out of stock

August, 1755. Newcastle, on the north bank of the Tyne. In the fields, men and women are getting the harvest in. Sunlight, or rain. Scudding clouds and backbreaking labour. Three hundred feet underground, young Charles Hutton is at the coalface. Cramped, dust-choked, wielding a five-pound pick by candlelight. Eighteen years old, he's been down the pits on and off for more than a decade, and now it looks like a life sentence. No unusual story, although Charles is a clever lad - gifted at maths and languages - and for a time he hoped for a different life. Many hoped. Charles Hutton, astonishingly, would actually live the life he dreamed of. Twenty years later you'd have found him in Slaughter's coffee house in London, eating a few oysters with the President of the Royal Society. By the time he died, in 1823, he was a fellow of scientific academies in four countries, while the Lord Chancellor of England counted himself fortunate to have known him. Hard work, talent, and no small share of luck would take Charles Hutton out of the pit to international fame, wealth, admiration and happiness. The pit-boy turned professor would become one of the most revered British scientists of his day. This book is his incredible story.

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