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A Republic for the Ages - The United States Capitol and the Political Culture of the Early Republic (Hardcover): Donald R Kennon A Republic for the Ages - The United States Capitol and the Political Culture of the Early Republic (Hardcover)
Donald R Kennon
R1,425 Discovery Miles 14 250 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

THIS VOLUME in the United States Capitol Historical Society's Perspectives on the American Revolution series explores how the architecture of the Capitol is imbued with the political culture of its time. Editor Donald R. Kennon writes, "Just as the constitutional framework for the new nation adapted and reformulated classical theories of republicanism, so too would the creation of its capital. The classical past would serve as models, but as models to be worked out in the context of the new American experiment in republicanism." These essays emanated from the syposium held by the Society in 1993 to commemorate the bicentennial of the laying of the cornerstone of the United States Capitol.

Ending the Civil War and Consequences for Congress (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Ending the Civil War and Consequences for Congress (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R629 R531 Discovery Miles 5 310 Save R98 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The social changes and human and economic costs of the Civil War led to profound legal and constitutional developments after it ended, not least of which were the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments and the many laws devised to protect the civil rights of newly freed African Americans. These amendments and laws worked for a while, but they were ineffective or ineffectively enforced for more than a century. In Ending the Civil War and the Consequences for Congress, contributors explore how the end of the war both continued the trauma of the conflict and enhanced the potential for the new birth of freedom that Lincoln promised in the Gettysburg Address. Collectively, they bring their multidisciplinary expertise to bear on the legal, economic, social, and political aspects of the aftermath of the war and Reconstruction era. The book concludes with the reminder of how the meaning of the war has changed over time. The Civil War is no longer the "felt" history it once was, Clay Risen reminds us, and despite the work of many fine scholars it remains contested. Contributors: Jenny Bourne, Carole Emberton, Paul Finkelman, Lorien Foote, William E. Nelson, Clay Risen, Anne Sarah Rubin, and Peter Wallenstein

Civil War Congress and the Creation of Modern America - A Revolution on the Home Front (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R... Civil War Congress and the Creation of Modern America - A Revolution on the Home Front (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R639 R541 Discovery Miles 5 410 Save R98 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Most literature on the Civil War focuses on soldiers, battles, and politics. But for every soldier in the United States Army, there were nine civilians at home. The war affected those left on the home front in many ways. Westward expansion and land ownership increased. The draft disrupted families while a shortage of male workers created opportunities for women that were previously unknown. The war also enlarged the national government in ways unimagined before 1861. The Homestead Act, the Land Grant College Act, civil rights legislation, the use of paper currency, and creation of the Internal Revenue Service to collect taxes to pay for the war all illustrate how the war fundamentally, and permanently, changed the nation. The essays in this book, drawn from a wide range of historical expertise and approaching the topic from a variety of angles, explore the changes in life at home that led to a revolution in American society and set the stage for the making of modern America. Contributors: Jean H. Baker, Jenny Bourne, Paul Finkelman, Guy Gugliotta, Daniel W. Stowell, Peter Wallenstein, Jennifer L. Weber.

Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Paperback): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Paperback)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon; Contributions by Jonathan H. Earle, Eric H. Walther, Lesley J Gordon, …
R546 R466 Discovery Miles 4 660 Save R80 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The American Civil War was the first military conflict in history to be fought with railroads moving troops and the telegraph connecting civilian leadership to commanders in the field. New developments arose at a moment's notice. As a result, the young nation's political structure and culture often struggled to keep up. When war began, Congress was not even in session. By the time it met, the government had mobilized over 100,000 soldiers, battles had been fought, casualties had been taken, some civilians had violently opposed the war effort, and emancipation was under way. This set the stage for Congress to play catch-up for much of the conflict. The result was an ongoing race to pass new laws and set policies. Throughout it all, Congress had to answer to a fractured and demanding public. In addition, Congress, no longer paralyzed by large numbers of Southern slave owners, moved forward on progressive economic and social issues-such as the transcontinental railroad and the land grant college act-which could not previously have been passed. In Congress and the People's Contest, Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon have assembled some of the nation's finest scholars of American history and law to evaluate the interactions between Congress and the American people as they navigated a cataclysmic and unprecedented war. Displaying a variety and range of focus that will make the book a classroom must, these essays show how these interactions took place-sometimes successfully, and sometimes less so. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Fergus M. Bordewich, Jenny Bourne, Jonathan Earle, Lesley J. Gordon, Mischa Honeck, Chandra Manning, Nikki M. Taylor, and Eric Walther.

Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Paperback): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Paperback)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R550 R470 Discovery Miles 4 700 Save R80 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

"When Lincoln took office, in March 1861, the national government had no power to touch slavery in the states where it existed. Lincoln understood this, and said as much in his first inaugural address, noting: `I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists.'" How, then, asks Paul Finkelman in the introduction to Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation, did Lincoln-who personally hated slavery-lead the nation through the Civil War to January 1865, when Congress passed the constitutional amendment that ended slavery outright? The essays in this book examine the route Lincoln took to achieve emancipation and how it is remembered both in the United States and abroad. The ten contributors-all on the cutting edge of contemporary scholarship on Lincoln and the Civil War-push our understanding of this watershed moment in US history in new directions. They present wide-ranging contributions to Lincoln studies, including a parsing of the sixteenth president's career in Congress in the 1840s and a brilliant critique of the historical choices made by Steven Spielberg and writer Tony Kushner in the movie Lincoln, about the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. As a whole, these classroom-ready readings provide fresh and essential perspectives on Lincoln's deft navigation of constitutional and political circumstances to move emancipation forward. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Jenny Bourne, Michael Burlingame, Orville Vernon Burton, Seymour Drescher, Paul Finkelman, Amy S. Greenberg, James Oakes, Beverly Wilson Palmer, Matthew Pinsker

Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon; Contributions by Jonathan H. Earle, Eric H. Walther, Lesley J Gordon, …
R1,008 R836 Discovery Miles 8 360 Save R172 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The American Civil War was the first military conflict in history to be fought with railroads moving troops and the telegraph connecting civilian leadership to commanders in the field. New developments arose at a moment's notice. As a result, the young nation's political structure and culture often struggled to keep up. When war began, Congress was not even in session. By the time it met, the government had mobilized over 100,000 soldiers, battles had been fought, casualties had been taken, some civilians had violently opposed the war effort, and emancipation was under way. This set the stage for Congress to play catch-up for much of the conflict. The result was an ongoing race to pass new laws and set policies. Throughout it all, Congress had to answer to a fractured and demanding public. In addition, Congress, no longer paralyzed by large numbers of Southern slave owners, moved forward on progressive economic and social issues-such as the transcontinental railroad and the land grant college act-which could not previously have been passed. In Congress and the People's Contest, Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon have assembled some of the nation's finest scholars of American history and law to evaluate the interactions between Congress and the American people as they navigated a cataclysmic and unprecedented war. Displaying a variety and range of focus that will make the book a classroom must, these essays show how these interactions took place-sometimes successfully, and sometimes less so. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Fergus M. Bordewich, Jenny Bourne, Jonathan Earle, Lesley J. Gordon, Mischa Honeck, Chandra Manning, Nikki M. Taylor, and Eric Walther.

The Committee on Ways and Means - A Bicentennial History 1789-1989 (Paperback): Donald R Kennon, Rebecca M Rogers The Committee on Ways and Means - A Bicentennial History 1789-1989 (Paperback)
Donald R Kennon, Rebecca M Rogers
R679 R645 Discovery Miles 6 450 Save R34 (5%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

0n July 24, 1989, the Committee on Ways and Means celebrates its bicentennial. The Committee on Ways and Means is the oldest committee of the Congress. Its history is a large part of our nation's history. The responsibilities vested in the committee have placed it at the center of some of the most critical legislative decisions faced by the Congress. The prestige accorded the committee is due in part, of course, to the breadth of its legislative jurisdiction: all revenues, the management of the public debt, tariff and trade laws, the Social Security and Medicare systems. These responsibilities alone would make it a committee of note. But just as important to its reputation has been the manner in which the members of the committee have exercised those responsibilities. One cannot read the history of the Committee on Ways and Means without recognizing the important role played by certain individuals at critical points in our nation's history. The history of the committee is replete with examples of legislators who, through the strength of their convictions, were able to lead the country in a direction it might not otherwise have gone. Examples include Gallatin, Randolph, Stevens, Underwood, Hull, Doughton, and Mills. Today we face enormous and seemingly permanent budget deficits the likes of which have never been seen in our history. This generation's unwillingness to pay for the government it demands means that future generations will be saddled with an intolerable debt burden. This situation did not begin in the 1980s, but it has increased dramatically during this period. What is disturbing is not so much the size of the debt; significant debts have accumulated in the past, especially in times of war. Much more troubling is our seeming inability to even debate, much less decide, on those changes necessary to reduce or eliminate the oppressive budget deficit. However, in the end it must be done or our nation will suffer the consequences. One can only wonder if this is not one of those critical periods when it is necessary to look beyond narrow parochial interest, a time when strong leadership is required. The future of our children and their children depends upon the leadership we exert today.

Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R843 R706 Discovery Miles 7 060 Save R137 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

"When Lincoln took office, in March 1861, the national government had no power to touch slavery in the states where it existed. Lincoln understood this, and said as much in his first inaugural address, noting: `I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists.'" How, then, asks Paul Finkelman in the introduction to Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation, did Lincoln-who personally hated slavery-lead the nation through the Civil War to January 1865, when Congress passed the constitutional amendment that ended slavery outright? The essays in this book examine the route Lincoln took to achieve emancipation and how it is remembered both in the United States and abroad. The ten contributors-all on the cutting edge of contemporary scholarship on Lincoln and the Civil War-push our understanding of this watershed moment in US history in new directions. They present wide-ranging contributions to Lincoln studies, including a parsing of the sixteenth president's career in Congress in the 1840s and a brilliant critique of the historical choices made by Steven Spielberg and writer Tony Kushner in the movie Lincoln, about the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. As a whole, these classroom-ready readings provide fresh and essential perspectives on Lincoln's deft navigation of constitutional and political circumstances to move emancipation forward. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Jenny Bourne, Michael Burlingame, Orville Vernon Burton, Seymour Drescher, Paul Finkelman, Amy S. Greenberg, James Oakes, Beverly Wilson Palmer, Matthew Pinsker

In the Shadow of Freedom - The Politics of Slavery in the National Capital (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon In the Shadow of Freedom - The Politics of Slavery in the National Capital (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon; Contributions by Jonathan H. Earle, Stanley Harrold, Mitch Kachun, …
R642 R544 Discovery Miles 5 440 Save R98 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Few images of early America were more striking, and jarring, than that of slaves in the capital city of the world's most important free republic. Black slaves served and sustained the legislators, bureaucrats, jurists, cabinet officials, military leaders, and even the presidents who lived and worked there. While slaves quietly kept the nation's capital running smoothly, lawmakers debated the place of slavery in the nation, the status of slavery in the territories newly acquired from Mexico, and even the legality of the slave trade in itself. This volume, with essays by some of the most distinguished historians in the nation, explores the twin issues of how slavery made life possible in the District of Columbia and how lawmakers in the district regulated slavery in the nation. Contributors: David Brion Davis, Mary Beth Corrigan, A. Glenn Crothers, Jonathan Earle, Stanley Harrold, Mitch Kachun, Mary K. Ricks, James B. Stewart, Susan Zaeske, David Zarefsky

Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R771 Discovery Miles 7 710 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

During the long decade from 1848 to 1861 America was like a train speeding down the track, without an engineer or brakes. The new territories acquired from Mexico had vastly increased the size of the nation, but debate over their status-and more importantly the status of slavery within them-paralyzed the nation. Southerners gained access to the territories and a draconian fugitive slave law in the Compromise of 1850, but this only exacerbated sectional tensions. Virtually all northerners, even those who supported the law because they believed that it would preserve the union, despised being turned into slave catchers. In 1854, in the Kansas-Nebraska Act, Congress repealed the ban on slavery in the remaining unorganized territories. In 1857, in the Dred Scott case, the Supreme Court held that all bans on slavery in the territories were unconstitutional. Meanwhile, northern whites, free blacks, and fugitive slaves resisted the enforcement of the 1850 fugitive slave law. In Congress members carried weapons and Representative Preston Brooks assaulted Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, nearly killing him. This was the decade of the 1850s and these were the issues Congress grappled with. This volume of new essays examines many of these issues, helping us better understand the failure of political leadership in the decade that led to the Civil War. Contributors Spencer R. Crew Paul Finkelman Matthew Glassman Amy S. Greenberg Martin J. Hershock Michael F. Holt Brooks D. Simpson Jenny Wahl

The House and Senate in the 1790s - Petitioning, Lobbying, and Institutional Development (Hardcover, 1): Kenneth R. Bowling The House and Senate in the 1790s - Petitioning, Lobbying, and Institutional Development (Hardcover, 1)
Kenneth R. Bowling; Contributions by Donald R Kennon
R1,086 Discovery Miles 10 860 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Amid the turbulent swirl of foreign intrigue, external and internal threats to the young nation's existence, and the domestic partisan wrangling of the 1790s, the United States Congress solidified its role as the national legislature. The ten essays in The House and Senate in the 1790s demonstrate the mechanisms by which this bicameral legislature developed its institutional identity. The first essay sets the scene for the institutional development of Congress by examining its constitutional origins and the efforts of the Founders to empower the new national legislature. The five following essays focus on two related mechanisms -- petitioning and lobbying -- by which citizens and private interests communicated with national lawmakers. Although scholars tend to see lobbying as a later nineteenth-century development, the papers presented here clearly demonstrate the existence of lobbyists and lobbying in the 1790s. The final four papers examine other aspects of the institutional development of the House and the Senate, including the evolution of political parties and congressional leadership. The essays in this collection, the third volume in the series Perspectives on the History of Congress, 1789-1801, originated in a series of conferences held by the United States Capitol Historical Society from 1994 to 2001.

Inventing Congress - Origins and Establishment of the First Federal Congress (Hardcover, 1): Kenneth R. Bowling, Donald R Kennon Inventing Congress - Origins and Establishment of the First Federal Congress (Hardcover, 1)
Kenneth R. Bowling, Donald R Kennon
R1,090 Discovery Miles 10 900 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

On March 4, 1789, New York City's church bells pealed, cannons fired, and flags snapped in the wind to celebrate the date set for the opening of the First Federal Congress. In many ways the establishment of Congress marked the culmination of the American Revolution as the ship of state was launched from the foundation of the legislative system outlined in Article I of the Constitution.
"Inventing Congress" presents the latest scholarship on the interrelated intellectual, institutional, cultural, and political antecedents of the formation of the First Federal Congress. The first section covers the origins of the body, ranging in discussion from the question of how the founders' understanding of classical Greek and Roman republican precedent shaped their thinking, to the political lessons learned during the Continental and Confederation Congresses.
The second section concerns itself with the establishment of the First Federal Congress, examining several heretofore little-treated aspects of the most important Congress in history, including its relationship to the press, morality, the arts and sciences, and economic philosophy.
"Inventing Congress" represents the papers from the first two conferences sponsored by the United States Capitol Historical Society in its series, "Perspectives on the History of Congress, 1789-1801."

Neither Separate Nor Equal - Congress in the 1790s (Hardcover, 1): Kenneth R. Bowling, Donald R Kennon Neither Separate Nor Equal - Congress in the 1790s (Hardcover, 1)
Kenneth R. Bowling, Donald R Kennon
R942 R787 Discovery Miles 7 870 Save R155 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Scholars today take for granted the existence of a "wall of separation" dividing the three branches of the federal government. "Neither Separate nor Equal: Congress in the 1790s" demonstrates that such lines of separation among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, however, were neither so clearly delineated nor observed in the first decade of the federal government's history.
The first two essays describe the social and cultural milieu attending the movement of the republican court from New York to Philadelphia and the physical and social environment of Philadelphia in the 1790s. The following section examines the congressional career of New York's Egbert Benson, the senatorial career of Robert Morris as an expression of his economic interests, the vigorous opposition of Rep. William Branch Giles to the Federalist policies of the Washington administration, and finally the underappreciated role of congressional spouses.
The last five essays concentrate on areas of interbranch cooperation and conflict. In particular, they discuss the meaning of separation of powers in the 1790s, Washington as an active president with Congress, the contrast between Hamilton's and Jefferson's exercise of political influence with Congress, and John Adams's relationship with Congress during the Quasi-War crisis.
The essays in this collection, the second volume of the series Perspectives on the History of Congress, 1789-1801, originated in two conferences held in 1995 and 1996 by the United States Capitol Historical Society.

Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism - From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson (Hardcover, Parental Adviso):... Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism - From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson (Hardcover, Parental Adviso)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon; Contributions by Michael Benedict, Daniel Feller, Robert Pierce Forbes, …
R930 R776 Discovery Miles 7 760 Save R154 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In 1815 the United States was a proud and confident nation. Its second war with England had come to a successful conclusion, and Americans seemed united as never before. The collapse of the Federalist party left the Jeffersonian Republicans in control of virtually all important governmental offices. This period of harmony-what historians once called the Era of Good Feeling-was not illusory, but it was far from stable. One-party government could not persist for long in a vibrant democracy full of ambitious politicians, and sectional harmony was possible only as long as no one addressed the hard issues: slavery, race, western expansion, and economic development. Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson inaugurates a new series for the United States Capitol Historical Society, one that will focus on issues that led to the secession crisis and the Civil War. This first volume examines controversies surrounding sectionalism and the rise of Jacksonian Democracy, placing these sources of conflict in the context of congressional action in the 1820s and 1830s. The essays in this volume consider the plight of American Indians, sectional strife over banking and commerce, emerging issues involving slavery, and the very nature of American democracy. "It is to be regretted that the rich and powerful too often bend the acts of government to their selfish purposes... . There are no necessary evils in government. Its evils exist only in its abuses. If it would confine itself to equal protection, and, as Heaven does its rains, shower its favors alike on the high and the low, the rich and the poor, it would be an unqualified blessing. In the act before me there seems to be a wide and unnecessary departure from these just principles." -Andrew Jackson, Veto Message Regarding the Bank of the United States, July 10, 1832 "I consider, then, the power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one State, incompatible with the existence of the Union, contradicted expressly by the letter of the Constitution, unauthorized by its spirit, inconsistent with every principle on which it was founded, and destructive of the great object for which it was formed." -Andrew Jackson, Proclamation Regarding Nullification to the People of South Carolina, December 10, 1832

The United States Capitol - Designing and Decorating a National Icon (Paperback): Donald R Kennon The United States Capitol - Designing and Decorating a National Icon (Paperback)
Donald R Kennon
R615 R551 Discovery Miles 5 510 Save R64 (10%) Special order

The United States Capitol is a national cultural icon, and among the most visually recognized seats of government in the world. The past quarter century has witnessed an explosion of scholarly interest in the art and architectural history of the Capitol. The emergence of the historic preservation movement and the maturation of the discipline of art conservation have refocused attention on the Capitol as the American "temple of liberty". Major restoration and conservation projects have made possible a better understanding and appreciation of the building and its decoration.

The United States Capitol: Designing and Decorating a National Icon is a product of this revival of scholarly interest. The book combines the papers from the U.S. Capitol Historical Society's first two conferences dedicated to the visual history and appreciation of this most significant of public buildings in the United States.

The first six papers in the collection focus on the roles of the architects of the Capitol from the contentious and delay-ridden first decade of construction through the twentieth-century expansion and modernization. The six essays in the book's second section examine a variety of topics relating to the Capitol's artistic decoration, including the origins of Statuary Hall, the mural Westward Ho! and other paintings and artistic embellishments.

American Pantheon - Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol (Hardcover, illustrated edition): Donald R... American Pantheon - Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol (Hardcover, illustrated edition)
Donald R Kennon, Thomas P. Somma
R1,341 Discovery Miles 13 410 Special order

Like the ancient Roman Pantheon, the U.S. Capitol was designed by its political and aesthetic arbiters to memorialize the virtues, events, and persons most representative of the nation's ideals-an attempt to raise a particular version of the nation's founding to the level of myth. American Pantheon examines the influences upon not only those virtues and persons selected for inclusion in the American pantheon, but also those excluded. Two chapters address the exclusion of slavery and African Americans from the art in the Capitol, a silence made all the more deafening by the major contributions of slaves and free black workers to the construction of the building. Two other authors consider the subject of women emerging as artists, subjects, patrons, and proponents of art in the Capitol, a development that began to emerge only in the second half of the nineteenth century. The Rotunda, the Capitol's principal ceremonial space, was designed in part as an art museum of American history-at least the authorized version of it. It is explored in several of the essays, including discussions of the influence of the early-nineteenth-century Italian sculptors who provided the first sculptural reliefs for the room and the contributions of the mid-nineteenth-century Italian American artist Constantino Brumidi, to the mix of allegory, mythology, and history that permeates the space and indeed the Capitol itself.

Montgomery C. Meigs and the Building of the Nation's Capital (Paperback): William C. Dickinson, Donald R Kennon, Dean A.... Montgomery C. Meigs and the Building of the Nation's Capital (Paperback)
William C. Dickinson, Donald R Kennon, Dean A. Herrin
R539 R483 Discovery Miles 4 830 Save R56 (10%) Special order

At the age of thirty-six, in 1852, Lt. Montgomery Cunningham Meigs of the Army Corps of Engineers reported to Washington, D.C., for duty as a special assistant to the chief army engineer, Gen. Joseph G. Totten. It was a fateful assignment, both for the nation's capital and for the bright, ambitious, and politically connected West Point graduate. Meigs's forty-year tenure in the nation's capital was by any account spectacularly successful. He surveyed, designed, and built the Washington water supply system, oversaw the extension of the U.S. Capitol and the erection of its massive iron dome, and designed and supervised construction of the Pension Building, now the home of the National Building Museum. The skills he exhibited in supervising engineering projects were carefully noted by political leaders, including president-elect Abraham Lincoln, who named Meigs quartermaster general of the Union Army, the most important position he held during his long and active military career. Meigs believed Washington, D.C., should be the reincarnation of Rome, the ancient capital of the Roman Empire. He endeavored to memorialize the story of the American nation in all the structures he built, expressing these ideas in murals, sculpture, and monumental design. Historians have long known Meigs for the organizational genius with which he fulfilled his duty as quartermaster general during the Civil War and for his unwavering loyalty to Lincoln and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. This volume establishes his claim as one of the major nineteenth-century contributors to the built environment of the nation's capital.

The United States Capitol - Designing and Decorating a National Icon (Hardcover): Donald R Kennon The United States Capitol - Designing and Decorating a National Icon (Hardcover)
Donald R Kennon
R1,621 Discovery Miles 16 210 Special order

"The United States Capitol" is a national cultural icon, and among the most visually recognized seats of government in the world. The past quarter century has witnessed an explosion of scholarly interest in the art and architectural history of the Capitol. The emergence of the historic preservation movement and the maturation of the discipline of art conservation have refocused attention on the Capitol as the American "temple of liberty." Major restoration and conservation projects have made possible a better understanding and appreciation of the building and its decoration.
"The United States Capitol: Designing and Decorating a National Icon" is a product of this revival of scholarly interest. The book combines the papers from the U.S. Capitol Historical Society's first two conferences dedicated to the visual history and appreciation of this most significant of public buildings in the United States.
The first six papers in the collection focus on the roles of the architects of the Capitol from the contentious and delay-ridden first decade of construction through the twentieth-century expansion and modernization. The six essays in the book's second section examine a variety of topics relating to the Capitol's artistic decoration, including the origins of Statuary Hall, the mural Westward Ho and other paintings and artistic embellishments.

Establishing Congress - The Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800 (Hardcover): Kenneth R. Bowling, Donald R... Establishing Congress - The Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800 (Hardcover)
Kenneth R. Bowling, Donald R Kennon
R814 Discovery Miles 8 140 Special order

Establishing Congress: The Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800 focuses on the end of the 1790s, when, in rapid succession, George Washington died, the federal government moved to Washington, D.C., and the election of 1800 put Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republican party in charge of the federal government.Establishing Congress dispels the myths and misinformation that surround the federal government's move to Washington and demonstrates that the election of 1800 changed American party politics forever, established the success of the American experiment in government, and completed the founding of the Republic. It also contends that the lame-duck session of Congress had far-reaching implications for the governance of the District of Columbia. Later chapters examine aspects of the political iconography of the capitol---one illuminating Jefferson's role in turning the building into a temple for the legislature and an instrument for nation-building, another examining the fascinating decades-long debate over burying George Washington in the Capitol. The collection considers as well the political implications of social life in early Washington, examining the political lobbying by Washington women within a social context and detailing the social and political life in the city's homes, hotels, boardinghouses and eating messes. Establishing Congress is an invaluable reference work for anyone interested in these pivotal moments in American history.Kenneth R. Bowling is co-editor, with Donald R. Kennon, of Inventing Congress: Origins and Establishment of the First Federal Congress (Ohio, 1999), Neither Separate nor Equal: Congress in the 1790s (Ohio, 2000), and The Houseand Senate in the 1790s: Petitioning, Lobbying, and Institutional Development (Ohio, 2002).Donald R. Kennon is chief historian of the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. He is general editor of the Ohio University Press series Perspectives on the History of Congress, 1789?1801, which contains the present volume, and the series Perspectives on the Art and Architectural History of the United States Capitol.

American Pantheon - Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol (Paperback, New): Donald R Kennon, Thomas... American Pantheon - Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol (Paperback, New)
Donald R Kennon, Thomas P. Somma
R604 R558 Discovery Miles 5 580 Save R46 (8%) Special order

Like the ancient Roman Pantheon, the U.S. Capitol was designed by its political and aesthetic arbiters to memorialize the virtues, events, and persons most representative of the nation's ideals-an attempt to raise a particular version of the nation's founding to the level of myth. American Pantheon examines the influences upon not only those virtues and persons selected for inclusion in the American pantheon, but also those excluded. Two chapters address the exclusion of slavery and African Americans from the art in the Capitol, a silence made all the more deafening by the major contributions of slaves and free black workers to the construction of the building. Two other authors consider the subject of women emerging as artists, subjects, patrons, and proponents of art in the Capitol, a development that began to emerge only in the second half of the nineteenth century. The Rotunda, the Capitol's principal ceremonial space, was designed in part as an art museum of American history-at least the authorized version of it. It is explored in several of the essays, including discussions of the influence of the early-nineteenth-century Italian sculptors who provided the first sculptural reliefs for the room and the contributions of the mid-nineteenth-century Italian American artist Constantino Brumidi, to the mix of allegory, mythology, and history that permeates the space and indeed the Capitol itself.

Civil Engineering History - Engineers Make History - Proceedings of the First National Symposium on Civil Engineering History... Civil Engineering History - Engineers Make History - Proceedings of the First National Symposium on Civil Engineering History Held in Conjunction with the ASCE National Convention in Washington, D.C, November 10-14, 1996 (Paperback)
Jerry R. Rogers, Donald R Kennon
R963 Discovery Miles 9 630 Special order

The proceedings, ""Civil Engineering History: Engineers Make History"", contains papers presented at the First National Symposium on Civil Engineering History held in Washington, D.C., November 10-13, 1996. This collection presents the history of civil engineering from a variety of perspectives. Some papers explore history from the point-of-view of the people who lived it, while others emphasize what today's civil engineer should know about their past.

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R14 R12 Discovery Miles 120
Softlips Tinted Lip Conditioner - Pearl…
R33 Discovery Miles 330

 

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