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Barbecue - a Savor the South (R) cookbook (Hardcover): John Shelton Reed Barbecue - a Savor the South (R) cookbook (Hardcover)
John Shelton Reed
R426 R355 Discovery Miles 3 550 Save R71 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

John Shelton Reed's Barbecue celebrates a southern culinary tradition forged in coals and smoke. Since colonial times southerners have held barbecues to mark homecomings, reunions, and political campaigns; today barbecue signifies celebration as much as ever. In a lively and amusing style, Reed traces the history of southern barbecue from its roots in the sixteenth-century Caribbean, showing how this technique of cooking meat established itself in the coastal South and spread inland from there. He discusses how choices of meat, sauce, and cooking methods came to vary from one place to another, reflecting local environments, farming practices, and history. Reed hopes to preserve the South's barbecue traditions by providing the home cook with recipes for many classic varieties of barbecue and for the side dishes, breads, and desserts that usually go with it. Featured meats range from Pan-Southern Pork Shoulder to Barbecued Chicken Two Ways to West Texas Beef Ribs, while rubs and sauces include Memphis Pork Rub, Piedmont Dip, and Lone Star Sauce and Mop. Cornbread, hushpuppies, and slaw are featured side dishes, and Dori's Peach Cobbler and Pig-Pickin' Cake provide a sweet finish. This book will put southerners in touch with their heritage and let those who aren't southerners pretend that they are.

Holy Smoke - The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue (Paperback, 2nd): John Shelton Reed, Volberg. Dale Reed Holy Smoke - The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue (Paperback, 2nd)
John Shelton Reed, Volberg. Dale Reed; As told to William McKinney
R573 R479 Discovery Miles 4 790 Save R94 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Finally available in paperback - the definitive guide to the people, recipes, and lore North Carolina is home to the longest continuous barbecue tradition on the North American mainland. Now available for the first time in paperback, Holy Smoke is a passionate exploration of the lore, recipes, traditions, and people who have helped shape North Carolina's signature slowfood dish. A new preface by the authors examines the latest news, good and bad, from the world of Tar Heel barbecue, and their updated guide to relevant writing, films, and websites is an essential guide to North Carolina barbecue.

Mixing It Up - A South-Watcher's Miscellany (Hardcover): John Shelton Reed Mixing It Up - A South-Watcher's Miscellany (Hardcover)
John Shelton Reed
R764 R613 Discovery Miles 6 130 Save R151 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Too often depicted as a region with a single, dominant history and a static culture, the American South actually comprises a wide range of unique places and cultures, each with its own history and evolving identity. John Shelton Reed's Mixing It Up is a medley of writings that examine how ideas of the South, and what it means to be southern, have changed over the last century. Through essays, op-eds, speeches, statistical reports, elegies, panegyrics, feuilletons, rants, and more, Reed's penetrating observations, wry humor, and expansive knowledge help him to examine the South's past, survey its present, and venture a few modest predictions about its future. Touching on an array of topics from the region's speech, manners, and food, to politics, religion, and race relations, Reed also assesses the work of other pundits, scholars, and South-watchers. From Appalachia to New Orleans, Mixing it Up: A South-Watcher's Miscellany offers a collection of lively prose and provocative observations about this ever-changing region and its people.

William Spratling, His Life and Art (Paperback): Taylor D. Littleton, John Shelton Reed William Spratling, His Life and Art (Paperback)
Taylor D. Littleton, John Shelton Reed
R596 R487 Discovery Miles 4 870 Save R109 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In this lavishly illustrated biography of silversmith and graphic artist William Spratling (1900-1967), Taylor D. Littleton reintroduces one of the most fascinating American expatriates of the early twentieth century. Best known for his revolutionary silver designs, Spratling influenced an entire generation of Mexican and American silversmiths and transformed the tiny village of Taxco into the ""Florence of Mexico."" Littleton widens the context of Spratling's popular reputation by examining the formative periods in his life and art that preceded his brilliant entrepreneurial experiment in the Las Delicias workshop in Taxco, which left a permanent mark on Mexico's artistic orientation and economic life. Spratling made a fortune manufacturing and designing silver, but his true life's work was to conserve, redeem, and interpret the ancient culture of his adopted country. He explained for North American audiences the paintings of Mexico's modern masters and earned distinction as a learned and early collector of pre-Columbian art. Spratling and his workshop gradually became a visible and culturally attractive link between a steady stream of notable American visitors and the country they wanted to see and experience. Spratling had the rare good fortune to witness his own reputation - as one of the most admired Americans in Mexico - assume legendary status before his death. William Spratling, His Life and Art vividly reconstructs this richly diverse life whose unique aesthetic legacy is but a part of its larger cultural achievement of profoundly influencing Americans' attitudes toward a civilisation different from their own.

Dixie Bohemia - A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s (Paperback): John Shelton Reed Dixie Bohemia - A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s (Paperback)
John Shelton Reed
R452 R384 Discovery Miles 3 840 Save R68 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In the years following World War I, the New Orleans French Quarter attracted artists and writers with its low rents, faded charm, and colorful street life. By the 1920s Jackson Square had become the center of a vibrant if short-lived bohemia. A young William Faulkner and his roommate William Spratling, an artist who taught at Tulane University, resided among the "artful and crafty ones of the French Quarter." In Dixie Bohemia John Shelton Reed introduces Faulkner's circle of friends -- ranging from the distinguished Sherwood Anderson to a gender-bending Mardi Gras costume designer -- and brings to life the people and places of New Orleans in the Jazz Age.

Reed begins with Faulkner and Spratling's self-published homage to their fellow bohemians, "Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles." The book contained 43 sketches of New Orleans artists, by Spratling, with captions and a short introduction by Faulkner. The title served as a rather obscure joke: Sherwood was not a Creole and neither were most of the people featured. But with Reed's commentary, these profiles serve as an entry into the world of artists and writers that dined on Decatur Street, attended masked balls, and blatantly ignored the Prohibition Act. These men and women also helped to establish New Orleans institutions such as the Double Dealer literary magazine, the Arts and Crafts Club, and Le Petit Theatre. But unlike most bohemias, the one in New Orleans existed as a whites-only affair. Though some of the bohemians were relatively progressive, and many employed African American material in their own work, few of them knew or cared about what was going on across town among the city's black intellectuals and artists.

The positive developments from this French Quarter renaissance, however, attracted attention and visitors, inspiring the historic preservation and commercial revitalization that turned the area into a tourist destination. Predictably, this gentrification drove out many of the working artists and writers who had helped revive the area. As Reed points out, one resident who identified herself as an "artist" on the 1920 federal census gave her occupation in 1930 as "saleslady, real estate," reflecting the decline of an active artistic class.

A charming and insightful glimpse into an era, Dixie Bohemia describes the writers, artists, poseurs, and hangers-on in the New Orleans art scene of the 1920s and illuminates how this dazzling world faded as quickly as it began.

Leftovers (Paperback): John Shelton Reed Leftovers (Paperback)
John Shelton Reed
R1,165 R1,089 Discovery Miles 10 890 Save R76 (7%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Glorious Battle - The Cultural Politics of Victorian Anglo-Catholicism (Paperback): John Shelton Reed Glorious Battle - The Cultural Politics of Victorian Anglo-Catholicism (Paperback)
John Shelton Reed
R369 Discovery Miles 3 690 Ships in 7 - 11 working days
My Tears Spoiled My Aim - And Other Reflections on Southern Culture (Paperback, 1st Harvest ed): John Shelton Reed My Tears Spoiled My Aim - And Other Reflections on Southern Culture (Paperback, 1st Harvest ed)
John Shelton Reed
R271 R237 Discovery Miles 2 370 Save R34 (13%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

With characteristic tongue-in-cheek wit, Reed tackles the questions, Just what is "the South" today? Where is it? Why are Southerners so devoted to it? Instructional maps include "Where Kudzu Grows" and "States Mentioned in Country Music Lyrics."

Whistling Dixie - Dispatches from the South (Paperback, 1st Harvest/HBJ ed): John Shelton Reed Whistling Dixie - Dispatches from the South (Paperback, 1st Harvest/HBJ ed)
John Shelton Reed
R374 R327 Discovery Miles 3 270 Save R47 (13%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

If you think that nowadays the South is pretty much just a hot Midwest, meet John Shelton Reed: "Americans need to be reminded that there are good-sized regional differences in this country. So I'm volunteering to help with this reminding." Readers on both sides of the Late Unpleasantness will savor this witty and sometimes outrageous collection of essays presenting one Sutherner's viewpoint about what makes the South the South. (Reed on creeping homogenization, for example: "Atlanta represents what a quarter of a million Confederate soldiers died to prevent." Or on Southern manners: "A joke going around here asks why Southern women don't like group sex. Give up? Too many thank-you notes.")

Glorious Battle - The Cultural Politics of Victorian Anglo-Catholicism (Paperback, New Ed): John Shelton Reed Glorious Battle - The Cultural Politics of Victorian Anglo-Catholicism (Paperback, New Ed)
John Shelton Reed
R1,020 Discovery Miles 10 200 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"How the Anglo-Catholic movement in the Victorian Church of England overcame opposition to establish itself as a legitimate form of Anglicanism."


A thorough, compelling, and often amusing account of how the Anglo-Catholic movement in the Victorian Church of England overcame vehement opposition to establish itself as a legitimate form of Anglicanism.


From working class tenements to the pages of Punch to the very Houses of Parliament, the Victorian Anglo-Catholic movement provoked bitter debate and even violence throughout Victorian times. Rotten vegetables were thrown at priests as they spoke from their pulpits, and fistfights broke out among families over whether dear departed ones would be buried "High Church" or "Low Church." In this innovative critical study, John Shelton Reed provides the first comprehensive treatment of the rise, growth, and eventual consolidation of this controversial movement within the Victorian Church of England.


Reed identifies Anglo-Catholicism as a countercultural movement, in some ways not unlike the counterculture of the 1960s, one that championed practices that were symbolic affronts to some of the central values of the dominant middle-class culture of its time. He identifies certain members of the clergy (including John Henry Newman and his circle), the urban poor, women, and youth of both sexes, expecially those who were put off by "muscular Christianity," as those most attracted both to what the movement had to offer and to the shock value it gave to the institutions, classes, and individuals whom they despised. Each of these component groups can be seen as culturally subordinate or in decline--threatened, oppressed, or at least bored by the Victorian values that the movement challenged--and thus ready to hear subversive messages.


A distinguished sociologist, best known as a major interpreter of the American South, Reed here explores new ground with characteristic scholarly acumen, thorough and meticulous research, fresh perspective and insight, and a remarkably engaging literary style. He has uncovered and taken full advantage of a wealth of largely untapped archival material, from the library of Pusey House, Oxford, as well as the Bodleian Library and the British Library, and has fashioned this into a cogent analysis that will enhance understanding of the subject for both scholars and general readers. His conclusions will shed light on many aspects of Victorian studies and the related disciplines of history (social, cultural, political, intellectual, and ecclesiastical), literary studies, women's studies, and the study of social movements. All future work on Anglo-Catholicism and related subjects will be indebted to Reed's "Glorious Battle."


This book has been supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Minding the South (Paperback): John Shelton Reed Minding the South (Paperback)
John Shelton Reed
R1,316 Discovery Miles 13 160 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

For over three decades John Shelton Reed has been "minding" the South. He is the author or editor of thirteen books about the region. Despite his disclaimer concerning the formal study of Southern history, Reed has read widely and in depth about the South. His primary focus is upon Southerners' present-day culture, but he knows that one must approach the South historically in order to understand the place and its people.

Why is the South so different from the rest of America? Rupert Vance, Reed's predecessor in sociology at Chapel Hill, once observed that the existence of the South is a triumph of history over geography and economics. The South has resisted being assimilated by the larger United States and has kept a personality that is distinctly its own. That is why Reed celebrates the South.

The chapters in this book cover everything from great thinkers about the South--Eugene D. Genovese, C. Vann Woodward, M. E. Bradford--to the uniqueness of a region that was once a hotbed of racism, but has recently attracted hundreds of thousands of black people transplanted from the North. There are also chapters about Southerners who have devoted their talents to politics, soft drinks, rock and roll, and jewelry design. Reed writes with wit and Southern charm, never afraid to speak his mind, even when it comes to taking his beloved South to task. While readers may not share all his opinions, most will agree that John Shelton Reed is one of the best "South watchers" there is.

Cornbread Nation 4 - The Best of Southern Food Writing (Paperback): Dale Volberg Reed, John Shelton Reed Cornbread Nation 4 - The Best of Southern Food Writing (Paperback)
Dale Volberg Reed, John Shelton Reed; Contributions by John T Edge
R534 R440 Discovery Miles 4 400 Save R94 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This new collection in the Southern Foodways Alliance's popular series serves up a fifty-three-course celebration of southern foods, southern cooking, and the people and traditions behind them. Editors Dale Volberg Reed and John Shelton Reed have combed magazines, newspapers, books, and journals to bring us a ""best of"" gathering that is certain to satisfy everyone from omnivorous chowhounds to the most discerning student of regional foodways.After an opening celbration of the joys of spring in her natal Virginia by the redoubtable Edna Lewis, the Reeds organize their collection under eight sections exploring Louisiana and the Gulf Coast before and after hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the food and farming of the Carolina Lowcountry, ""Sweet Things,"" southern snacks and fast foods, ""Downhome Food,"" ""Downhome Places,"" and a comparison of southern foods with those of other cultures.In his ""This Isn't the Last Dance,"" Rick Bragg recounts his experience, many years ago, of a New Orleans jazz funeral and finds hope therein that the unique spirit of New Orleanians will allow them to survive: ""I have seen these people dance, laughing, to the edge of a grave. I believe that, now, they will dance back from it."" ""My passport may be stamped Yankee,"" writes Jessica B. Harris in her ""Living North/Eating South,"" ""but there's no denying that my stomach and culinary soul and those of many others like me are pure Dixie.""In her ""Tough Enough: The Muscadine Grape,"" Simone Wilson explains that the lowly southern fruit has double the heart-healthy resveratrol of French grapes, thus offering the hope of a ""southern paradox."" The title of Candice Dyer's brief history says it all: ""Scattered, Smothered, Covered, and Chunked: Fifty Years of the Waffle House."" In a photo essay, documentarian Amy Evans shows us the world of oystering along northwest Florida's Apalachicola Bay, and for the first time in the series, recipes are given - for a roux, braised collard greens, doberge cake, and other dishes.

Millways of Kent (Paperback): J. Kenneth Morland Millways of Kent (Paperback)
J. Kenneth Morland; Introduction by Dan Huntley; Preface by John Shelton Reed
R478 Discovery Miles 4 780 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This is a compelling portrait of life in a Southern Piedmont mill village after the Great Depression.Morland's skill as an oral historian and his respect for blue-collar subjects allow him to describe the cotton mill workers of York as sympathetic, three-dimensional human beings, something a bit more than even their insular white neighbors in the town of York would have classified them as. As Morland discovered, the segregation of poor white mill workers from the existing town of York mirrored the experiences of the early waves of European immigrants into American cities.The plight of the working families in the mill village, their daily joys and disappointments, and the governing call of the mill whistle are all brought vibrantly to life through Morland's words, creating a powerfully detailed snapshot of an American subculture that no longer exists. Huntley's new introduction assesses the lasting importance of Morland's telling case study. The volume is further supplemented with a 2002 interview with Morland and his wife detailing their experiences with the ""Kent"" research and including photographs from the period.

Southern Folk Plain and Fancy - Native White Social Types (Paperback, New edition): John Shelton Reed Southern Folk Plain and Fancy - Native White Social Types (Paperback, New edition)
John Shelton Reed
R525 Discovery Miles 5 250 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Creating a sort of periodic table of the southern populace, "Southern Folk, Plain and Fancy" catalogs and describes the several social types--gentleman and lady, "lord of the lash" and cunning belle, fun-loving "good old boy," depraved redneck, and other figures--that have animated the region since antebellum times.

The Enduring South - Subcultural Persistence in Mass Society (Paperback, New edition): John Shelton Reed The Enduring South - Subcultural Persistence in Mass Society (Paperback, New edition)
John Shelton Reed
R781 R610 Discovery Miles 6 100 Save R171 (22%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

First published in 1972, "The Enduring South" challenges the conventional wisdom that economic development, urbanization, and the end of racial segregation spelled the end of a distinctive Southern culture. In this edition, John Reed updates the public opinion data to the 1980s and reinforces the book's original conclusions: Southerners are different and are likely to stay that way.

One South - An Ethnic Approach to Regional Culture (Paperback): John Shelton Reed One South - An Ethnic Approach to Regional Culture (Paperback)
John Shelton Reed
R505 Discovery Miles 5 050 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

If it can be said that there are many Souths, wrote W. J. Cash in The Mind of the South, ""the fact remains that there is also one South."" In the informal, engaging essays brought together in One South, John Shelton Reed focuses on the South's strong regional identity and on the persistence, well into the last decades if the twentieth century, of Southern cultural distinctiveness. Reed argues that Southerners are similar in much the same way that members if an ethnic group are similar. He discusses the South's shared cultural values, ranging from serious examinations of Southern violence and regional identity to considerations of Southern humor, country music, and the emergence of a new Southern middle class, epitomized by the family of former president Jimmy Carter. Reed opens his volume with three essays dealing with the discipline of sociology and its relation to the South. The first essay proposes ways that sociology can contribute to the mainstream of regional studies; the second traces the history of sociological attention to the South in our century; and the this suggests that the sociological way of thinking may be somewhat alien to well-bred Southerners. In the next section, Reed looks at the question of group identity, arguing in one essay, ""The Heart of Dixie,"" that the South is best defined by locating Southerners, rather than by isolating a particular geographic region. Reed then turns his attention to minority and fringe groups within the South, including, in ""Shalom, Y'All,"" Southern Jews. A final section looks at some of the particular advantages and disadvantages of life in the New South today. Reed's explorations into the region's culture reveal that Southerners are identifiable as a group less by obvious background characteristics, education, occupation, rural or urban residence, than by shared attitudes toward family and community, religious beliefs and practices, and violence and the private use of force: the kind of things that customarily identify ethnic groups. In this way, One South demonstrates how history and the heritage of Southernness have for now triumphed over the disintegrating forces of geography and economics.

Perspectives on the American South - An Annual Review of Society, Politics, and Culture (Hardcover): Merle Black, John Shelton... Perspectives on the American South - An Annual Review of Society, Politics, and Culture (Hardcover)
Merle Black, John Shelton Reed
R3,886 Discovery Miles 38 860 Out of stock
Kicking Back - Further Dispatches from the South (Hardcover, New): John Shelton Reed Kicking Back - Further Dispatches from the South (Hardcover, New)
John Shelton Reed
R890 Discovery Miles 8 900 Out of stock

Why are Northerners offended when Southerners ask them where they go to church? Why are Southerners offended when Californians ask them what they do for exercise? Reed explores cultural differences between North and South, from manners to the treatment of pets. He bemoans the fact that today's Southerners can't make a mint julep, and he reports vigorous indigestion upon leaving his beloved South: "If you want to map the region, maybe you could just point us north and draw the Rolaid line."

From a barbecue cook-off in Memphis to a stock-car race in Darlington, from a War Between the States reenactment in North Carolina to a tent meeting (of sorts) in Arkansas, Reed covers the Southern scene. He also rushes in where angels fear to tread, tackling such touchy subjects as date rape, Martin Luther King's plagiarism, the Confederate flag, and the Duke University boys choir. But Reed is no ideologue; his reflections on these and other issues are guaranteed to make everyone think. Often feisty, always frank, Kicking Back is vintage Reed. So kick back and prepare for a treat as the man the Kansas City Star called the "H. L. Mencken of Dixie" picks, provokes, pummels, and prods us to think and to laugh-- especially at ourselves.

Minding the South (Hardcover): John Shelton Reed Minding the South (Hardcover)
John Shelton Reed
R3,290 Discovery Miles 32 900 Out of stock

For over three decades John Shelton Reed has been "minding" the South. He is the author or editor of thirteen books about the region. Despite his disclaimer concerning the formal study of Southern history, Reed has read widely and in depth about the South. His primary focus is upon Southerners' present-day culture, but he knows that one must approach the South historically in order to understand the place and its people. Why is the South so different from the rest of America? Rupert Vance, Reed's predecessor in sociology at Chapel Hill, once observed that the existence of the South is a triumph of history over geography and economics. The South has resisted being assimilated by the larger United States and has kept a personality that is distinctly its own. That is why Reed celebrates the South. The chapters in this book cover everything from great thinkers about the South Eugene D. Genovese, C. Vann Woodward, M. E. Bradford to the uniqueness of a region that was once a hotbed of racism, but has recently attracted hundreds of thousands of black people transplanted from the North. There are also chapters about Southerners who have devoted their talents to politics, soft drinks, rock and roll, and jewelry design. Reed writes with wit and Southern charm, never afraid to speak his mind, even when it comes to taking his beloved South to task. While readers may not share all his opinions, most will agree that John Shelton Reed is one of the best "South watchers" there is.

Dixie Bohemia - A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s (Hardcover): John Shelton Reed Dixie Bohemia - A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s (Hardcover)
John Shelton Reed
R808 R647 Discovery Miles 6 470 Save R161 (20%) Out of stock

In the years following World War I, the New Orleans French Quarter attracted artists and writers with its low rents, faded charm, and colorful street life. By the 1920s Jackson Square had become the center of a vibrant if short-lived bohemia. A young William Faulkner and his roommate William Spratling, an artist who taught at Tulane University, resided among the "artful and crafty ones of the French Quarter." In Dixie Bohemia John Shelton Reed introduces Faulkner's circle of friends -- ranging from the distinguished Sherwood Anderson to a gender-bending Mardi Gras costume designer -- and brings to life the people and places of New Orleans in the Jazz Age.

Reed begins with Faulkner and Spratling's self-published homage to their fellow bohemians, "Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles." The book contained 43 sketches of New Orleans artists, by Spratling, with captions and a short introduction by Faulkner. The title served as a rather obscure joke: Sherwood was not a Creole and neither were most of the people featured. But with Reed's commentary, these profiles serve as an entry into the world of artists and writers that dined on Decatur Street, attended masked balls, and blatantly ignored the Prohibition Act. These men and women also helped to establish New Orleans institutions such as the Double Dealer literary magazine, the Arts and Crafts Club, and Le Petit Theatre. But unlike most bohemias, the one in New Orleans existed as a whites-only affair. Though some of the bohemians were relatively progressive, and many employed African American material in their own work, few of them knew or cared about what was going on across town among the city's black intellectuals and artists.

The positive developments from this French Quarter renaissance, however, attracted attention and visitors, inspiring the historic preservation and commercial revitalization that turned the area into a tourist destination. Predictably, this gentrification drove out many of the working artists and writers who had helped revive the area. As Reed points out, one resident who identified herself as an "artist" on the 1920 federal census gave her occupation in 1930 as "saleslady, real estate," reflecting the decline of an active artistic class.

A charming and insightful glimpse into an era, Dixie Bohemia describes the writers, artists, poseurs, and hangers-on in the New Orleans art scene of the 1920s and illuminates how this dazzling world faded as quickly as it began.

Townways of Kent (Paperback): Ralph C. Patrick Townways of Kent (Paperback)
Ralph C. Patrick; Edited by John Shelton Reed, Dale Volberg Reed; Preface by John Shelton Reed
R473 Discovery Miles 4 730 Out of stock

Emersion into the society of York was an easy task for Patrick, a native of a nearby Gastonia, North Carolina, and with familial ties to York's elite. But his personal connections proved to be a mixed blessing to the project. His informants were more forthcoming than they might have been with an outsider, but Patrick felt so deep an obligation to protect their privacy that he never published his findings.Established from Patrick's 1954 Harvard dissertation, this first publication of ""Townways of Kent"" invites modern readers to experience mid-century small-town life from the vantage of the white upper and middle classes, and in particular from the viewpoint of ""Old Kent"" families. Often disparaging in their views of the African American and mill village communities, the townfolk prove to be further subdivided along rigorously defined lines of economic status and ancestry - established families versus newer arrivals - but pride in their community's history and in maintaining a particular vision of the town shines through. The introduction by the Reeds places Patrick's work in its historical context and to bring the story of town life in Kent up to the present day.

My Tears Spoiled My Aim - And Other Reflections on Southern Culture (Hardcover, New): John Shelton Reed My Tears Spoiled My Aim - And Other Reflections on Southern Culture (Hardcover, New)
John Shelton Reed
R666 Discovery Miles 6 660 Out of stock

The Kansas City Star calls John Shelton Reed "an H. L. Mencken of Dixie." "A writer this funny is dangerous," says the Raleigh News and Observer. Here Reed is in peak form as he takes a hard, often humorous look at a region he claims has created its own quasi-ethnic group: the American Southerner. Is the South changing? You bet, says Reed. Industrialism, urbanization, and desegregation are just a few of the things that have changed it almost beyond recognition. In fact, one constant in the South is change. "Those who like their boundaries well defined should not attempt to talk about Southerners," writes Reed. But for those willing to ask some difficult questions about the life and culture of the elusive Southerner, this is the place to start. Where is the South? Does it begin at the Mason-Dixon Line or the "Hell, yes!" line - where people begin to answer that way when asked if they're Southerners? Is it where kudzu grows? Or where bourbon is preferred over scotch? How do Southerners come by their reputation for laziness? What happens to Southern ways when Southerners leave the South - or Yankees come to it? How does the rest of the world perceive Southern women? To address that question Reed examines the Southern belles and good ol' girls who have made it into the page of Playboy. (Sorry, pictures not included.). In the title piece of this collection, Reed peruses country music lyrics to explore white Southern attitudes toward violence, from more-or-less-traditional homicides - romantic triangles and lovers' quarrels - to brawls that target everything from dogs to vending machines. And he cites his own "My Tears Spoiled My Aim" as one of the great unrecorded country songs of our time: My tears spoiled my aim; that's why you're not dead. I blew a hole in the wall two feet above the bed. I couldn't see where you were at, my tears were fallin' so. I tried to shoot by ear, but y'all were lyin' low. Perhaps one of the things that best defines the South is like my favorite pair of blue jeans," says Reed. "it's shrunk some, faded a bit, got a few holes in it. It doesn't look much like it used to, but it's more comfortable, and there's probably a lot of wear left in it." My Tears Spoiled My Aim will leave you chuckling - and reflecting - as one of the most perceptive observers of the South shows that no matter how much it changes, it's still the South.

Surveying the South - Studies in Regional Sociology (Hardcover): John Shelton Reed Surveying the South - Studies in Regional Sociology (Hardcover)
John Shelton Reed
R1,106 Discovery Miles 11 060 Out of stock

John Shelton Reed is a sociologist who "can write clearly; has a sense of humor; and is not afraid to express opinion," according to "Choice." Reed's popular, often humorous, books on the American South have earned him a reputation as one of the region's most perceptive observers. "Surveying the South" collects some of his classic essays, offering an engaging introduction to the sociology of the South.

Beginning with the roots of regional sociology, Reed examines threads of Southern continuity and change, including such issues as Southern stereotypes and the changing definition of the South. His fascinating history of the elusive but often-cited correlation between cotton prices and lynching offers a profound warning to students and professors alike: always verify your references.

Reed offers several essays on what has been called "the central theme" of Southern sociology--race relations. He demonstrates the success of the civil rights movement in the South and explores the ways in which Southern identity has become more regional than racial.

Reed concludes this collection with a plea to sociologists to abandon the effort to "sound scientific." "Let's not seal the borders of our profession with an impenetrable style and vocabulary," writes Reed. "Plainly, outsiders are not impressed."

The result is a brilliant collection written in Reed's trademark style--clear, witty, jargon-free--that will find a warm welcome among students of sociology and the South, as well as among general readers.

Surveying the South - Studies in Regional Sociology (Paperback): John Shelton Reed Surveying the South - Studies in Regional Sociology (Paperback)
John Shelton Reed
R636 Discovery Miles 6 360 Out of stock

Surveying the South collects some of John Shelton Reed's classic essays which offer an introduction to the sociology of the South. Beginning with the roots of regional sociology, Reed examines threads of continuity and change in southern sociology, including such issues as southern stereotypes and the changing definition of the South. His history of the mythical but often-cited correlation between cotton prices and lynching offers a profound warning students and scholars alike - ""always verify your references"". Reed offers several essays on what has been called ""the central theme"" of southern sociology - race relations. He demonstrates the success of the civil rights movement in the South and explores the ways in which southern identity has become more regional than racial. Reed concludes this collection with a plea to sociologists to abandon the effort to ""sound scientific"". ""Let's not seal the borders of our profession with an impenetrable style and vocabulary,"" writes Reed. ""Plainly, outsiders are not impressed"". This work is intended to be useful to students of sociology and southern studies and to general readers.

Blackways of Kent (Paperback): Hylan Lewis Blackways of Kent (Paperback)
Hylan Lewis; Introduction by John H. Stanfield; Preface by John Shelton Reed
R503 Discovery Miles 5 030 Out of stock

This is a participant-observer's account of African American life in a small Southern town just prior to the Civil Rights era.Consisting of ""Blackways of Kent"" (1955), ""Millways of Kent"" (1958), and ""Townways of Kent"", the ""Kent Trilogy"" forms a remarkable southern ethnography that maps the social stratification of the Piedmont town of York, South Carolina, in the late 1940s, after the Great Depression and before Civil Rights era. In 1946 the University of North Carolina's Institute for Research in Social Science commissioned a series of southern community studies from which these volumes resulted.Lewis offers a participant-observer's views on small-town southern race relations in the mid-twentieth century. Based on Lewis's interviews with community informants and experiences working in York between 1948 and 1949, the dynamic descriptions of individuals and rich explorations of institutions and traditions bring the community to life once more. Wholly segregated from the townfolk and from the poor whites of the mill village, the black community constructed a fully realized culture all its own. Most telling in Lewis's astute observations into the hierarchy of this community is that, unlike the rigid white class structure based in ancestry and wealth, stratification in the black community was governed by personal behavior. This edition is expanded with a new preface by Reed on the origins and impact of the ""Kent Trilogy"" and new introduction by Stanfield detailing Lewis's field research for this volume as well as his subsequent career.

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