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Showing 1 - 16 of 16 matches in All departments

Sacred Encounters - Father De Smet and the Indians of the Rocky Mountain West (Paperback): Jacquelyn Peterson, Laura Peers Sacred Encounters - Father De Smet and the Indians of the Rocky Mountain West (Paperback)
Jacquelyn Peterson, Laura Peers
R428 R354 Discovery Miles 3 540 Save R74 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In 1841 Jesuit Pierre Jean De Smet arrived among the Coeur d'Alene Salish Indians in what is today northern Idaho and western Montana. With 200 color and 20 b&w illustrations, this catalog of the international Sacred Encounters exhibition displays the similarities and differences between European Christianity and Native American beliefs.

Visiting with the Ancestors - Blackfoot Shirts in Museum Spaces (Paperback): Laura Peers, Alison K. Brown Visiting with the Ancestors - Blackfoot Shirts in Museum Spaces (Paperback)
Laura Peers, Alison K. Brown
R878 R737 Discovery Miles 7 370 Save R141 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In 2010, five magnificent Blackfoot shirts, now owned by theUniversity of Oxford's Pitt Rivers Museum, were brought toAlberta to be exhibited at the Glenbow Museum, in Calgary, and the GaltMuseum, in Lethbridge. The shirts had not returned to Blackfootterritory since 1841, when officers of the Hudson's Bay Companyacquired them. The shirts were later transported to England, where theyhad remained ever since. Exhibiting the shirts at the museums was, however, only one part ofthe project undertaken by Laura Peers and Alison Brown. Prior to theinstallation of the exhibits, groups of Blackfoot people-hundredsaltogether-participated in special "handlingsessions," in which they were able to touch the shirts andexamine them up close. The shirts, some painted with mineral pigmentsand adorned with porcupine quillwork, others decorated with locks ofhuman and horse hair, took the breath away of those who saw, smelled,and touched them. Long-dormant memories were awakened, and many of theparticipants described a powerful sense of connection and familiaritywith the shirts, which still house the spirit of the ancestors who worethem. In the pages of this beautifully illustrated volume is the story ofan effort to build a bridge between museums and source communities, inhopes of establishing stronger, more sustaining relationships betweenthe two and spurring change in prevailing museum policies. Negotiatingthe tension between a museum's institutional protocol andBlackfoot cultural protocol was challenging, but the experiencedescribed both by the authors and by Blackfoot contributors to thevolume was transformative. Museums seek to preserve objects forposterity. This volume demonstrates that the emotional and spiritualpower of objects does not vanish with the death of those who createdthem. For Blackfoot people today, these shirts are a living presence,one that evokes a sense of continuity and inspires pride in Blackfootcultural heritage.

My First Years in the Fur Trade - The Journals of 1802-1804 (Paperback): George Nelson My First Years in the Fur Trade - The Journals of 1802-1804 (Paperback)
George Nelson; Edited by Laura Peers
R472 R373 Discovery Miles 3 730 Save R99 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

"The writings of fur trader George Nelson are wonderfully rich, vivid, and personal. Laura Peers and Theresa Schenck have rendered great service in bringing these writings forward, editing and annotating them witgh care and empathy. This is a significant work for all who are interested in Native and fur trade history and seek to imagine what life was really like in those times."

Jennifer S. H. Brown, author of Strangers in Blood: Fur Trade Comapny Families in Indian Country

"There was no other fur trader like George Nelson. He was a pure ethnographer of the world around him and of the content of his own heart. Like Defoe and Melville, he was a tolerant, sympathetic teller of truth, but he had his own clear voice. At long last, thanks to the splendid work of Peers and Schenck, he may finally get the honor that was always due him: a following of grateful readers."

Bruce White, author of We Are at Home: Pictures of the Ojibwe People

The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1870 (Paperback): Laura Peers The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1870 (Paperback)
Laura Peers
R404 Discovery Miles 4 040 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Peers examines the emergence of the western Ojibwa in the context of the historical forces that acted upon Native people and the spirit, determination, and strategies used to cope with those forces. She bases the work on fur-trade-company and government documents, traders' and missionaries' journals and diaries, letters, reminiscences, as well as ethnographic and archaeological data, material culture, and photographic and art images - many sources not accessible to pioneering scholars.

This Is Our Life - Haida Material Heritage and Changing Museum Practice (Paperback): Cara Krmpotich, Laura Peers This Is Our Life - Haida Material Heritage and Changing Museum Practice (Paperback)
Cara Krmpotich, Laura Peers
R748 R628 Discovery Miles 6 280 Save R120 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Those interested in museum-Indigenous relations and in the anthropology of museums, as well as general readers with an interest in First Nations art and culture.

This Is Our Life - Haida Material Heritage and Changing Museum Practice (Hardcover): Cara Krmpotich, Laura Peers This Is Our Life - Haida Material Heritage and Changing Museum Practice (Hardcover)
Cara Krmpotich, Laura Peers
R1,891 R1,544 Discovery Miles 15 440 Save R347 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Those interested in museum-Indigenous relations and in the anthropology of museums, as well as general readers with an interest in First Nations art and culture.

Gathering Places - Aboriginal and Fur Trade Histories (Paperback): Carolyn Podruchny, Laura Peers Gathering Places - Aboriginal and Fur Trade Histories (Paperback)
Carolyn Podruchny, Laura Peers
R755 R635 Discovery Miles 6 350 Save R120 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

British traders and Ojibwe hunters. Cree women and their metis
daughters. Explorers and anthropologists and Aboriginal guides and
informants. These people, their relationships, and their complex
identities and worldviews were not featured in histories of North
America until the 1970s, when scholars from multiple disciplines began
to bring new perspectives and approaches to bear on the past.

"Gathering Places" presents some of the most innovative and
interdisciplinary approaches to metis, fur trade, and First Nations
history being practised today. Whether they are discussing dietary
practices on the Plateau, trees as cultural and geographical markers in
the trade, the meanings of totemic signatures, issues of representation
in public history, or the writings of Aboriginal anthropologists and
historians, the authors link archival, archaeological, material, oral,
and ethnographic evidence to offer novel explorations that extend
beyond earlier scholarship centred on the archive. They draw on
Aboriginal perspectives, material forms of evidence, and personal
approaches to history to illuminate cross-cultural encounters and
challenge older approaches to the past.

These fascinating essays on aspects of the history of Rupert's
Land mark a significant departure from the old paradigm of history
writing and will serve as models for recovering and communicating
Aboriginal and cross-cultural experiences and perspectives.

Playing Ourselves - Interpreting Native Histories at Historic Reconstructions (Paperback): Laura Peers Playing Ourselves - Interpreting Native Histories at Historic Reconstructions (Paperback)
Laura Peers
R637 Discovery Miles 6 370 Special order

Across North America, hundreds of reconstructed Oliving historyO sites, which traditionally presented history from a primarily European perspective, have hired Native staff in an attempt to communicate a broader view of the past. Playing Ourselves explores this major shift in representation, using detailed observations of five historic sites in the U.S. and Canada to both discuss the theoretical aspects of Native cultural performance and advise interpreters and their managers on how to more effectively present an inclusive history. Drawing on anthropology, history, cultural performance, cross-cultural encounters, material culture theory, and public history, author Laura Peers examines Oliving historyO sites as locations of cultural performance where core beliefs about society, cross-cultural relationships, and history are performed. In the process, she emphasizes how choices made in the communication of history can both challenge these core beliefs about the past and improve cross-cultural relations in the present.

Museums and Source Communities - A Routledge Reader (Hardcover): Alison K. Brown, Laura Peers Museums and Source Communities - A Routledge Reader (Hardcover)
Alison K. Brown, Laura Peers
R2,123 Discovery Miles 21 230 Special order


The growth of collaboration between museums and source communities - the people from whom collections originate - is one of the most important developments in modern museum practice.
This volume combines some of the most influential published research in this emerging field with newly commissioned essays on the issues, problems and lessons involved.
Focusing on museums in North America, the Pacific and the United Kingdom, the book highlights three areas which demonstrate the new developments most clearly:
*The museum as field site or 'contact zone' - a place which source community members enter for purposes of consultation and collaboration
*Visual repatriation - the use of photography to return images of ancestors, historical moments and material heritage to source communities
*Exhibition case studies - these are discussed to reveal the implications of cross-cultural and collaborative research for museums, and how such projects have challenged established attitudes and practices

As the first overview of its kind, this collection will be essential reading for museum staff working with source communities, for community members involved with museum programmes, and for students and academics in museum studies and social anthropology.

Pictures Bring Us Messages / Sinaakssiiksi aohtsimaahpihkookiyaawa - Photographs and Histories from the Kainai Nation... Pictures Bring Us Messages / Sinaakssiiksi aohtsimaahpihkookiyaawa - Photographs and Histories from the Kainai Nation (Paperback)
Alison K. Brown, Laura Peers
R635 Discovery Miles 6 350 Special order

In 1925, Beatrice Blackwood of the University of Oxford's Pitt Rivers Museum took thirty-three photographs of Kainai people on the Blood Indian Reserve in Alberta as part of an anthropological project. In 2001, staff from the museum took copies of these photographs back to the Kainai and worked with community members to try to gain a better understanding of Kainai perspectives on the images." 'Pictures Bring Us Messages'" is about that process, about why museum professionals and archivists must work with such communities, and about some of the considerations that need to be addressed when doing so.

Exploring the meanings that historic photographs have for source communities, Alison K. Brown, Laura Peers, and members of the Kainai Nation develop and demonstrate culturally appropriate ways of researching, curating, archiving, accessing, and otherwise using museum and archival collections. They describe the process of relationship building that has been crucial to the research and the current and future benefits of this new relationship. While based in Canada, the dynamics of the" 'Pictures Bring Us Messages'" project is relevant to indigenous peoples and heritage institutions around the world.

Museums and Source Communities - A Routledge Reader (Paperback, New): Alison K. Brown, Laura Peers Museums and Source Communities - A Routledge Reader (Paperback, New)
Alison K. Brown, Laura Peers
R760 Discovery Miles 7 600 Special order


The growth of collaboration between museums and source communities - the people from whom collections originate - is one of the most important developments in modern museum practice.
This volume combines some of the most influential published research in this emerging field with newly commissioned essays on the issues, problems and lessons involved.
Focusing on museums in North America, the Pacific and the United Kingdom, the book highlights three areas which demonstrate the new developments most clearly:
*The museum as field site or 'contact zone' - a place which source community members enter for purposes of consultation and collaboration
*Visual repatriation - the use of photography to return images of ancestors, historical moments and material heritage to source communities
*Exhibition case studies - these are discussed to reveal the implications of cross-cultural and collaborative research for museums, and how such projects have challenged established attitudes and practices

As the first overview of its kind, this collection will be essential reading for museum staff working with source communities, for community members involved with museum programmes, and for students and academics in museum studies and social anthropology.

My First Years in the Fur Trade - The Journals of 1802-1804 (Hardcover): George Nelson, Laura Peers, Theresa Schenck My First Years in the Fur Trade - The Journals of 1802-1804 (Hardcover)
George Nelson, Laura Peers, Theresa Schenck
R962 Discovery Miles 9 620 Special order

Captivated by tales of adventure, fifteen-year-old George Nelson left his family in Quebec in 1802 and headed to the Northwest Territory to work for Sir Alexander Mackenzie's XY Company, one of the major fur trade companies of the time. Required to keep a daily log as a fur trade clerk, his growth from homesick lad to experienced fur trader forms the heart of this unique and fascinating journal. He recorded his feelings and thoughts, and was a vital witness to all that went on around him. Nelson's journals are particularly valuable for their candid observations on the customs and culture of the Ojibwa people and provide some of the most detailed descriptions available of Ojibwa spiritual practices. Long treasured by fur trade historians, the early journals of George Nelson are published here in their entirety for the first time. Careful editing and annotation by Laura Peers and Theresa Schenck explain references to people and Ojibwa culture and provide context on the North American fur trade.

My First Years in the Fur Trade - The Journals of 1802-1804 (Hardcover): George Nelson My First Years in the Fur Trade - The Journals of 1802-1804 (Hardcover)
George Nelson; Volume editing by Laura Peers, Theresa Schenck
R711 Discovery Miles 7 110 Special order

Captivated by the tales of adventure in the wild northwest told by the voyageurs, fifteen-year-old George Nelson left his family in southern Canada in 1802 and headed out to the Northwest Territory to begin a five-year contract working for Sir Alexander Mackenzie's XY Company, one of the major fur trade companies of the time. His growth from homesick lad to experienced fur trade over the next two years forms the heart of this unique and fascinating journal.

Nelson had been hired as a clerk but, because of the shortage of literate and experienced men, within a year he was promoted to manage a fur trade post on his own with, as he put it, "three men & an interpretor under me " With little training, at sixteen years of age, he was placed in charge of men who were as much as twice his age and much more experienced in the wilderness.

Required to keep a daily journal of the post, Nelson quickly became a vital witness to all that went on around him, recording a vibrant, detailed chronicle that allows us today to glimpse something of this fascinating world.

Long treasured by fur trade historians, the early journals of this extraordinary man are here published in their entirety for the first time. His journals offer both an unparalleled view of the fur trade and the story of one boy coming of age on the frontier.

Gathering Places - Aboriginal and Fur Trade Histories (Hardcover): Carolyn Podruchny, Laura Peers Gathering Places - Aboriginal and Fur Trade Histories (Hardcover)
Carolyn Podruchny, Laura Peers
R926 Discovery Miles 9 260 Special order

These essays are not only fascinating studies in their own right but also offer new models for the writing of metis, fur trade, and First Nations history.

The Ojibwa of Western Canada 1780-1870 (Hardcover): Laura Peers The Ojibwa of Western Canada 1780-1870 (Hardcover)
Laura Peers
R745 R570 Discovery Miles 5 700 Save R175 (23%) Special order

Among the most dynamic Aboriginal peoples in western Canada today are the Ojibwa, who have played an especially vital role in the development of an Aboriginal political voice at both levels of government. Yet, they are relative newcomers to the region, occupying the parkland and prairies only since the end of the 18th century. This work traces the origins of the western Ojibwa, their adaptations to the West, and the ways in which they have coped with the many challenges they faced in the first century of their history in that region, between 1780 and 1870. The western Ojibwa are descendants of Ojibwa who migrated from around the Great Lakes in the late 18th century. This was an era of dramatic change. Between 1780 and 1870, they survived waves of epidemic disease, the rise and decline of the fur trade, the depletion of game, the founding of non-Native settlement, the loss of tribal lands, and the government's assertion of political control over them. As a people who emerged, adapted, and survived in a climate of change, the western Ojibwa demonstrate both the effects of historic forces that acted upon Native peoples, and the spirit, determination, and adaptive strategies that the Native people have used to cope with those forces. This study examines the emergence of the western Ojibwa within this context, seeing both the cultural changes that they chose to make and the continuity within their culture as responses to historical pressures. The Ojibwa of Western Canada differs from earlier works by focussing closely on the details of western Ojibwa history in the crucial century of their emergence. It is based on documents to which pioneering scholars did not have access, including fur traders' and missionaries' journals, letters, and reminiscences. Ethnographic and archaeological data, and the evidence of material culture and photographic and art images, are also examined in this well-researched and clearly written history.

The Ojibwa of Western Canada 1780-1870 (Paperback): Laura Peers The Ojibwa of Western Canada 1780-1870 (Paperback)
Laura Peers
R478 R379 Discovery Miles 3 790 Save R99 (21%) Special order

Among the most dynamic Aboriginal peoples in western Canada today are the Ojibwa, who have played an especially vital role in the development of an Aboriginal political voice at both levels of government. Yet, they are relative newcomers to the region, occupying the parkland and prairies only since the end of the 18th century. This work traces the origins of the western Ojibwa, their adaptations to the West, and the ways in which they have coped with the many challenges they faced in the first century of their history in that region, between 1780 and 1870. The western Ojibwa are descendants of Ojibwa who migrated from around the Great Lakes in the late 18th century. This was an era of dramatic change. Between 1780 and 1870, they survived waves of epidemic disease, the rise and decline of the fur trade, the depletion of game, the founding of non-Native settlement, the loss of tribal lands, and the government's assertion of political control over them. As a people who emerged, adapted, and survived in a climate of change, the western Ojibwa demonstrate both the effects of historic forces that acted upon Native peoples, and the spirit, determination, and adaptive strategies that the Native people have used to cope with those forces. This study examines the emergence of the western Ojibwa within this context, seeing both the cultural changes that they chose to make and the continuity within their culture as responses to historical pressures. The Ojibwa of Western Canada differs from earlier works by focussing closely on the details of western Ojibwa history in the crucial century of their emergence. It is based on documents to which pioneering scholars did not have access, including fur traders' and missionaries' journals, letters, and reminiscences. Ethnographic and archaeological data, and the evidence of material culture and photographic and art images, are also examined in this well-researched and clearly written history.

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