0
Your cart

Your cart is empty

Browse All departments
  • All departments
Price
  • R500 - R1,000 (2)
  • R1,000 - R2,500 (2)
  • -
Status
Brand

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 matches in All departments

Indian Given - Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States (Paperback): Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo Indian Given - Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States (Paperback)
Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo
R625 R534 Discovery Miles 5 340 Save R91 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

In Indian Given Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo addresses current racialized violence and resistance in Mexico and the United States with a genealogy that reaches back to the sixteenth century. Saldana-Portillo formulates the central place of indigenous peoples in the construction of national spaces and racialized notions of citizenship, showing, for instance, how Chicanos/as in the U.S./Mexico borderlands might affirm or reject their indigenous background based on their location. In this and other ways, she demonstrates how the legacies of colonial Spain's and Britain's differing approaches to encountering indigenous peoples continue to shape perceptions of the natural, racial, and cultural landscapes of the United States and Mexico. Drawing on a mix of archival, historical, literary, and legal texts, Saldana-Portillo shows how los indios/Indians provided the condition of possibility for the emergence of Mexico and the United States.

Indian Given - Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States (Hardcover): Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo Indian Given - Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States (Hardcover)
Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo
R2,267 R1,839 Discovery Miles 18 390 Save R428 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

In Indian Given Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo addresses current racialized violence and resistance in Mexico and the United States with a genealogy that reaches back to the sixteenth century. Saldana-Portillo formulates the central place of indigenous peoples in the construction of national spaces and racialized notions of citizenship, showing, for instance, how Chicanos/as in the U.S./Mexico borderlands might affirm or reject their indigenous background based on their location. In this and other ways, she demonstrates how the legacies of colonial Spain's and Britain's differing approaches to encountering indigenous peoples continue to shape perceptions of the natural, racial, and cultural landscapes of the United States and Mexico. Drawing on a mix of archival, historical, literary, and legal texts, Saldana-Portillo shows how los indios/Indians provided the condition of possibility for the emergence of Mexico and the United States.

The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (Hardcover, New): Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (Hardcover, New)
Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo
R2,169 Discovery Miles 21 690 Out of stock

In "The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development, " Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo boldly argues that crucial twentieth-century revolutionary challenges to colonialism and capitalism in the Americas have failed to resist--and in fact have been constitutively related to--the very developmentalist narratives that have justified and naturalized postwar capitalism. Saldana-Portillo brings the critique of development discourse to bear on such exemplars of revolutionary and resistant political thought and practice as Ernesto "Che" Guevara, Malcolm X, the Sandinista government of Nicaragua, and the Guatemalan guerrilla resistance. She suggests that for each of these, developmentalist constructions frame the struggle as a heroic movement from unconsciousness to consciousness, from a childlike backwardness toward a disciplined and self-aware maturity.

Reading governmental reports, memos, and policies, Saldana-Portillo traces the arc of development narratives from its beginnings in the 1944 Bretton Woods conference through its apex during Robert S. McNamara's reign at the World Bank (1968-1981). She compares these narratives with models of subjectivity and agency embedded in the autobiographical texts of three revolutionary icons of the 1960s and 1970s--those of Che Guevara, Guatemalan insurgent Mario Payeras, and Malcolm X--and the agricultural policy of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN). Saldana-Portillo highlights a shared paradigm of a masculinist transformation of the individual requiring the "transcendence" of ethnic particularity for the good of the nation. While she argues that this model of progress often alienated the very communities targeted by the revolutionaries, she shows how contemporary insurgents such as Rigoberta Menchu, the Zapatista movement, and queer Aztlan have taken up the radicalism of their predecessors to retheorize revolutionary subjectivity for the twenty-first century.

The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (Paperback, New): Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (Paperback, New)
Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo
R581 Discovery Miles 5 810 Out of stock

In The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development, Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo boldly argues that crucial twentieth-century revolutionary challenges to colonialism and capitalism in the Americas have failed to resist-and in fact have been constitutively related to-the very developmentalist narratives that have justified and naturalized postwar capitalism. Saldana-Portillo brings the critique of development discourse to bear on such exemplars of revolutionary and resistant political thought and practice as Ernesto "Che" Guevara, Malcolm X, the Sandinista government of Nicaragua, and the Guatemalan guerrilla resistance. She suggests that for each of these, developmentalist constructions frame the struggle as a heroic movement from unconsciousness to consciousness, from a childlike backwardness toward a disciplined and self-aware maturity. Reading governmental reports, memos, and policies, Saldana-Portillo traces the arc of development narratives from its beginnings in the 1944 Bretton Woods conference through its apex during Robert S. McNamara's reign at the World Bank (1968-1981). She compares these narratives with models of subjectivity and agency embedded in the autobiographical texts of three revolutionary icons of the 1960s and 1970s-those of Che Guevara, Guatemalan insurgent Mario Payeras, and Malcolm X-and the agricultural policy of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN). Saldana-Portillo highlights a shared paradigm of a masculinist transformation of the individual requiring the "transcendence" of ethnic particularity for the good of the nation. While she argues that this model of progress often alienated the very communities targeted by the revolutionaries, she shows how contemporary insurgents such as Rigoberta Menchu, the Zapatista movement, and queer Aztlan have taken up the radicalism of their predecessors to retheorize revolutionary subjectivity for the twenty-first century.

Free Delivery
Pinterest Twitter Facebook Google+
You may like...
Kingsons Valentine Series Shoulder Bag…
 (2)
R551 Discovery Miles 5 510
Afritrail Grand Deluxe Top Centre Steel…
 (2)
R1,999 R1,599 Discovery Miles 15 990
Loot
Nadine Gordimer Paperback  (2)
R336 R283 Discovery Miles 2 830
Police To Be Eau De Toilette (40ml)
R389 Discovery Miles 3 890
Loot
Nadine Gordimer Paperback  (2)
R336 R283 Discovery Miles 2 830
Alcosan Alcohol Hand Sanitiser (100ml)
 (7)
R65 R50 Discovery Miles 500
Blessed By Bosasa - Inside Gavin…
Adriaan Basson Paperback  (1)
R275 R220 Discovery Miles 2 200
Philips Avent Natural Trainer Cup 150ml
R194 Discovery Miles 1 940
ZA Dainty Silver Circle Necklace
R439 R299 Discovery Miles 2 990
Mellerware Juno - Stainless Steel…
 (8)
R1,599 R999 Discovery Miles 9 990

 

Partners