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PRIMER (Hardcover): Matthew Craven PRIMER (Hardcover)
Matthew Craven
R1,038 R782 Discovery Miles 7 820 Save R256 (25%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Utilizing found images from textbooks along with his own geometric patterns, Matthew Craven's collages and illustrations seek to create a new handmade universe, juxtaposing imagery from different cultures and time periods to celebrate commonalities. Photographs of archaeological remains and the natural world are overlaid on colorful tiled backgrounds drawn on the back of vintage movie posters, to create a hypnotic and mesmerizing vernacular of symbols and designs. Featuring an introduction by LACMA curator Leslie Jones, Primer, is the first publication of Craven's art and a reconfiguration of traditional historical narratives inspired by obsessive formations.

Barlow the Bear and his Thinning Hair (Paperback): Matthew Cravens Barlow the Bear and his Thinning Hair (Paperback)
Matthew Cravens
R208 Discovery Miles 2 080 Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Sleepy Squirrel (Paperback): Matthew Cravens Sleepy Squirrel (Paperback)
Matthew Cravens
R208 Discovery Miles 2 080 Ships in 7 - 11 working days
The Decolonization of International Law - State Succession and the Law of Treaties (Hardcover): Matthew Craven The Decolonization of International Law - State Succession and the Law of Treaties (Hardcover)
Matthew Craven
R4,155 Discovery Miles 41 550 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The issue of state succession continues to be a vital and complex focal point for public international lawyers, yet it has remained strangely resistant to effective articulation. The formative period in this respect was that of decolonization which marked for many the time when international law came of age and when the promises of the UN Charter would be realized in an international community of sovereign peoples. Throughout the 1990s a series of territorial adjustments placed succession once again at the centre of international legal practice, in new contexts that went beyond the traditional model of decolonization: the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia, and the unifications of Germany and Yemen brought to light the fundamentally unresolved character of issues within the law of succession. Why have attempts to codify the practice of succession met with so little success? Why has succession remained so problematic a feature of international law? This book argues that the answers to these questions lie in the political backdrop of decolonization and self-determination, and that the tensions and ambiguities that run throughout the law of succession can only be understood by looking at the historical relationship between discourses on state succession, decolonization, and imperialism within the framework of international law.

Time, History and International Law (Hardcover): Matthew Craven, Malgosia Fitzmaurice, Maria Vogiatzi Time, History and International Law (Hardcover)
Matthew Craven, Malgosia Fitzmaurice, Maria Vogiatzi
R4,332 Discovery Miles 43 320 Out of stock

This book examines theoretical and practical issues concerning the relationship between international law, time and history. Problems relating to time and history are ever-present in the work of international lawyers, whether understood in terms of the role of historic practice in the doctrine of sources, the application of the principle of inter-temporal law in dispute settlement, or in gaining a coherent insight into the role that was played by international law in past events. But very little has been written about the various different ways in which international lawyers approach or understand the past, and it is with a view to exploring the dynamics of that engagement that this book has been compiled. In its broadest sense, it is possible to identify at least three different ways in which the relationship between international law and (its) history may be conceived. The first is that of a history of international law written in narrative form, and mapped out in terms of a teleology of origins, development, progress or renewal. The second is that of history in international law and of the role history plays in arguments about law itself (for example in the construction of customary international law). The third way of understanding that relationship is in terms of international law in history: of understanding how international law has been engaged in the creation of a history that in some senses stands outside the history of international law itself. The essays in this collection make clear that each type of engagement with history and international law interweaves various different types of historical narrative, pointing to the typically multi-layered nature of international lawyers' engagement with the past and its importance in shaping the present and future of international law. Originally published in hardcover

The Decolonization of International Law - State Succession and the Law of Treaties (Paperback): Matthew Craven The Decolonization of International Law - State Succession and the Law of Treaties (Paperback)
Matthew Craven
R1,503 Discovery Miles 15 030 Out of stock

The issue of state succession continues to be a vital and complex focal point for public international lawyers, yet it has remained strangely resistant to effective articulation. The formative period in this respect was that of decolonization which marked for many the time when international law 'came of age' and when the promises of the UN Charter would be realized in an international community of sovereign peoples. Throughout the 1990s a series of territorial adjustments placed succession once again at the centre of international legal practice, in new contexts that went beyond the traditional model of decolonization: the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia, and the unifications of Germany and Yemen brought to light the fundamentally unresolved character of issues within the law of succession.
Why have attempts to codify the practice of succession met with so little success? Why has succession remained so problematic a feature of international law? This book argues that the answers to these questions lie in the political backdrop of decolonization and self-determination, and that the tensions and ambiguities that run throughout the law of succession can only be understood by looking at the relationship between discourses on state succession, decolonization, and imperialism within the framework of international law.

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