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Ending the Civil War and Consequences for Congress (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Ending the Civil War and Consequences for Congress (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R629 R531 Discovery Miles 5 310 Save R98 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The social changes and human and economic costs of the Civil War led to profound legal and constitutional developments after it ended, not least of which were the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments and the many laws devised to protect the civil rights of newly freed African Americans. These amendments and laws worked for a while, but they were ineffective or ineffectively enforced for more than a century. In Ending the Civil War and the Consequences for Congress, contributors explore how the end of the war both continued the trauma of the conflict and enhanced the potential for the new birth of freedom that Lincoln promised in the Gettysburg Address. Collectively, they bring their multidisciplinary expertise to bear on the legal, economic, social, and political aspects of the aftermath of the war and Reconstruction era. The book concludes with the reminder of how the meaning of the war has changed over time. The Civil War is no longer the "felt" history it once was, Clay Risen reminds us, and despite the work of many fine scholars it remains contested. Contributors: Jenny Bourne, Carole Emberton, Paul Finkelman, Lorien Foote, William E. Nelson, Clay Risen, Anne Sarah Rubin, and Peter Wallenstein

Signposts - New Directions in Southern Legal History (Paperback): Patricia Hagler Minter, Sally E. Hadden Signposts - New Directions in Southern Legal History (Paperback)
Patricia Hagler Minter, Sally E. Hadden; Series edited by Paul Finkelman, Timothy S. Huebner; Contributions by Alfred L. Brophy, …
R656 Discovery Miles 6 560 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In "Signposts," Sally E. Hadden and Patricia Hagler Minter have assembled seventeen essays, by both established and rising scholars, that showcase new directions in southern legal history across a wide range of topics, time periods, and locales. The essays will inspire today's scholars to dig even more deeply into the southern legal heritage, in much the same way that David Bodenhamer and James Ely's seminal 1984 work, "Ambivalent Legacy," inspired an earlier generation to take up the study of southern legal history.
Contributors to "Signposts" explore a wide range of subjects related to southern constitutional and legal thought, including real and personal property, civil rights, higher education, gender, secession, reapportionment, prohibition, lynching, legal institutions such as the grand jury, and conflicts between bench and bar. A number of the essayists are concerned with transatlantic connections to southern law and with marginalized groups such as women and native peoples. Taken together, the essays in "Signposts" show us that understanding how law changes over time is essential to understanding the history of the South.
Contributors: Alfred L. Brophy, Lisa Lindquist Dorr, Laura F. Edwards, James W. Ely Jr., Tim Alan Garrison, Sally E. Hadden, Roman J. Hoyos, Thomas N. Ingersoll, Jessica K. Lowe, Patricia Hagler Minter, Cynthia Nicoletti, Susan Richbourg Parker, Christopher W. Schmidt, Jennifer M. Spear, Christopher R. Waldrep, Peter Wallenstein, Charles L. Zelden.

James McHenry, Forgotten Federalist (Paperback): Karen E. Robbins James McHenry, Forgotten Federalist (Paperback)
Karen E. Robbins; Series edited by Paul Finkelman, Timothy S. Huebner
R606 Discovery Miles 6 060 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

A Scots-Irish immigrant, James McHenry determined to make something of his life. Trained as a physician, he joined the American Revolution when war broke out. He then switched to a more military role, serving on the staffs of George Washington and Lafayette. He entered government after the war and served in the Maryland Senate and in the Continental Congress. As Maryland's representative at the Constitutional Convention, McHenry helped to add the ex post facto clause to the Constitution and worked to increase free trade among the states. As secretary of war, McHenry remained loyal to Washington, under whom he established a regimental framework for the army that lasted well into the nineteenth century. Upon becoming president, John Adams retained McHenry; however, Adams began to believe McHenry was in league with other Hamiltonian Federalists who wished to undermine his policies. Thus, when the military buildup for the Quasi-War with France became unpopular, Adams used it as a pretext to request McHenry's resignation. Yet as Karen Robbins demonstrates in the first modern biography of McHenry, Adams was mistaken; the friendship between McHenry and Hamilton that Adams feared had grown sensitive and there was a brief falling out. Moreover, McHenry had asked Hamilton to withdraw his application for second-in-command of the New Army being raised. Nonetheless, Adams' misperception ended McHenry's career, and he has remained an obscure historical figure ever since - until now. James McHenry, Forgotten Federalist reveals a man surrounded by important events who reflected the larger themes of his time.

Supreme Injustice - Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman Supreme Injustice - Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman
R624 R484 Discovery Miles 4 840 Save R140 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

The three most important Supreme Court Justices before the Civil War--Chief Justices John Marshall and Roger B. Taney and Associate Justice Joseph Story--upheld the institution of slavery in ruling after ruling. These opinions cast a shadow over the Court and the legacies of these men, but historians have rarely delved deeply into the personal and political ideas and motivations they held. In Supreme Injustice, the distinguished legal historian Paul Finkelman establishes an authoritative account of each justice's proslavery position, the reasoning behind his opposition to black freedom, and the incentives created by circumstances in his private life. Finkelman uses census data and other sources to reveal that Justice Marshall aggressively bought and sold slaves throughout his lifetime--a fact that biographers have ignored. Justice Story never owned slaves and condemned slavery while riding circuit, and yet on the high court he remained silent on slave trade cases and ruled against blacks who sued for freedom. Although Justice Taney freed many of his own slaves, he zealously and consistently opposed black freedom, arguing in Dred Scott that free blacks had no Constitutional rights and that slave owners could move slaves into the Western territories. Finkelman situates this infamous holding within a solid record of support for slavery and hostility to free blacks. Supreme Injustice boldly documents the entanglements that alienated three major justices from America's founding ideals and embedded racism ever deeper in American civic life.

Civil War Congress and the Creation of Modern America - A Revolution on the Home Front (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R... Civil War Congress and the Creation of Modern America - A Revolution on the Home Front (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R639 R541 Discovery Miles 5 410 Save R98 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Most literature on the Civil War focuses on soldiers, battles, and politics. But for every soldier in the United States Army, there were nine civilians at home. The war affected those left on the home front in many ways. Westward expansion and land ownership increased. The draft disrupted families while a shortage of male workers created opportunities for women that were previously unknown. The war also enlarged the national government in ways unimagined before 1861. The Homestead Act, the Land Grant College Act, civil rights legislation, the use of paper currency, and creation of the Internal Revenue Service to collect taxes to pay for the war all illustrate how the war fundamentally, and permanently, changed the nation. The essays in this book, drawn from a wide range of historical expertise and approaching the topic from a variety of angles, explore the changes in life at home that led to a revolution in American society and set the stage for the making of modern America. Contributors: Jean H. Baker, Jenny Bourne, Paul Finkelman, Guy Gugliotta, Daniel W. Stowell, Peter Wallenstein, Jennifer L. Weber.

Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Paperback): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Paperback)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon; Contributions by Jonathan H. Earle, Eric H. Walther, Lesley J Gordon, …
R546 R466 Discovery Miles 4 660 Save R80 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The American Civil War was the first military conflict in history to be fought with railroads moving troops and the telegraph connecting civilian leadership to commanders in the field. New developments arose at a moment's notice. As a result, the young nation's political structure and culture often struggled to keep up. When war began, Congress was not even in session. By the time it met, the government had mobilized over 100,000 soldiers, battles had been fought, casualties had been taken, some civilians had violently opposed the war effort, and emancipation was under way. This set the stage for Congress to play catch-up for much of the conflict. The result was an ongoing race to pass new laws and set policies. Throughout it all, Congress had to answer to a fractured and demanding public. In addition, Congress, no longer paralyzed by large numbers of Southern slave owners, moved forward on progressive economic and social issues-such as the transcontinental railroad and the land grant college act-which could not previously have been passed. In Congress and the People's Contest, Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon have assembled some of the nation's finest scholars of American history and law to evaluate the interactions between Congress and the American people as they navigated a cataclysmic and unprecedented war. Displaying a variety and range of focus that will make the book a classroom must, these essays show how these interactions took place-sometimes successfully, and sometimes less so. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Fergus M. Bordewich, Jenny Bourne, Jonathan Earle, Lesley J. Gordon, Mischa Honeck, Chandra Manning, Nikki M. Taylor, and Eric Walther.

Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Paperback): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Paperback)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R550 R470 Discovery Miles 4 700 Save R80 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

"When Lincoln took office, in March 1861, the national government had no power to touch slavery in the states where it existed. Lincoln understood this, and said as much in his first inaugural address, noting: `I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists.'" How, then, asks Paul Finkelman in the introduction to Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation, did Lincoln-who personally hated slavery-lead the nation through the Civil War to January 1865, when Congress passed the constitutional amendment that ended slavery outright? The essays in this book examine the route Lincoln took to achieve emancipation and how it is remembered both in the United States and abroad. The ten contributors-all on the cutting edge of contemporary scholarship on Lincoln and the Civil War-push our understanding of this watershed moment in US history in new directions. They present wide-ranging contributions to Lincoln studies, including a parsing of the sixteenth president's career in Congress in the 1840s and a brilliant critique of the historical choices made by Steven Spielberg and writer Tony Kushner in the movie Lincoln, about the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. As a whole, these classroom-ready readings provide fresh and essential perspectives on Lincoln's deft navigation of constitutional and political circumstances to move emancipation forward. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Jenny Bourne, Michael Burlingame, Orville Vernon Burton, Seymour Drescher, Paul Finkelman, Amy S. Greenberg, James Oakes, Beverly Wilson Palmer, Matthew Pinsker

American Legal History - Cases and Materials (Paperback, 5th edition): Kermit L. Hall, Paul Finkelman, James W. Ely American Legal History - Cases and Materials (Paperback, 5th edition)
Kermit L. Hall, Paul Finkelman, James W. Ely
R2,023 Discovery Miles 20 230 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

This highly acclaimed text provides a comprehensive selection of the most important documents in American legal history, integrating the history of public and private law from America's colonial origins to the present. Devoting special attention to the interaction of social and legal change, American Legal History: Cases and Materials, Fifth Edition, shows how legal ideas developed in tandem with specific historical events and reveals a rich legal culture unique to America. The book also deals with state and federal courts and looks at the relationship between the development of American society, politics, and economy and how it relates to the evolution of American law. Introductions and instructive headnotes accompany each document, tying legal developments to broader historical themes and providing a social and political context essential to an understanding of the history of law in America. Setting the legal challenges of the twenty-first century in a broad context, American Legal History, Fifth Edition, is an indispensable text for students and teachers of constitutional and legal history, the judicial process, and the effects of society on law.

Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South - A Brief History with Documents (Paperback, New): Paul Finkelman Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South - A Brief History with Documents (Paperback, New)
Paul Finkelman
R577 Discovery Miles 5 770 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Within decades of the American Revolution, the Northern states had either ended slavery or provided for its gradual abolition. Slavery, however, was entrenched in the South and remained integral to American politics and culture. Nationally, it was protected by the U.S. Constitution, federal laws, and Supreme Court decisions, and slaveowners dominated all three branches of the federal government. From the time of the Revolution until the Civil War (and beyond), Southern thinkers offered a variety of proslavery arguments. This body of thought--based on religion, politics and law, economics, history, philosophy, expediency, and science--offers invaluable insights into how slavery shaped American history and continues to affect American society. In this volume, Paul Finkelman presents a representative selection of proslavery thought and includes an introduction that explores the history of slavery and the debate over it. His headnotes supply a rich context for each reading. The volume also includes a chronology, a selected bibliography, and illustrations.

In Essentials, Unity - An Economic History of the Grange Movement (Hardcover): Jenny Bourne In Essentials, Unity - An Economic History of the Grange Movement (Hardcover)
Jenny Bourne; Preface by Paul Finkelman
R1,202 R991 Discovery Miles 9 910 Save R211 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The Patrons of Husbandry-or the Grange-is the longest-lived US agricultural society and, since its founding shortly after the Civil War, has had immeasurable influence on social change as enacted by ordinary Americans. The Grange sought to relieve the struggles of small farmers by encouraging collaboration. Pathbreaking for its inclusion of women, the Grange is also well known for its association with Gilded Age laws aimed at curbing the monopoly power of railroads. In Essentials, Unity takes as its focus Grange founder Oliver Kelley and his home organization in Minnesota. Jenny Bourne draws upon numerous historical records to present a lively picture of a fraternal organization devoted to improving the lot of farmers but whose legacies extend far beyond agriculture. From struggles over minimum wage, birth control, and environmental regulation to the conflicts surrounding the Affordable Care Act, and from lunch-counter sit-ins to Occupy Wall Street, the Grange has shaped the very notion of collective action and how it is deployed even today. As this compact book so effectively illustrates, the history of the Patrons of Husbandry exposes the classic tension between the desires for achieving overall economic success and determining how the spoils are split.

Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Congress and the People's Contest - The Conduct of the Civil War (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon; Contributions by Jonathan H. Earle, Eric H. Walther, Lesley J Gordon, …
R1,008 R836 Discovery Miles 8 360 Save R172 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The American Civil War was the first military conflict in history to be fought with railroads moving troops and the telegraph connecting civilian leadership to commanders in the field. New developments arose at a moment's notice. As a result, the young nation's political structure and culture often struggled to keep up. When war began, Congress was not even in session. By the time it met, the government had mobilized over 100,000 soldiers, battles had been fought, casualties had been taken, some civilians had violently opposed the war effort, and emancipation was under way. This set the stage for Congress to play catch-up for much of the conflict. The result was an ongoing race to pass new laws and set policies. Throughout it all, Congress had to answer to a fractured and demanding public. In addition, Congress, no longer paralyzed by large numbers of Southern slave owners, moved forward on progressive economic and social issues-such as the transcontinental railroad and the land grant college act-which could not previously have been passed. In Congress and the People's Contest, Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon have assembled some of the nation's finest scholars of American history and law to evaluate the interactions between Congress and the American people as they navigated a cataclysmic and unprecedented war. Displaying a variety and range of focus that will make the book a classroom must, these essays show how these interactions took place-sometimes successfully, and sometimes less so. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Fergus M. Bordewich, Jenny Bourne, Jonathan Earle, Lesley J. Gordon, Mischa Honeck, Chandra Manning, Nikki M. Taylor, and Eric Walther.

The Dred Scott Case - Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Race and Law (Hardcover): David Thomas Konig, Paul Finkelman,... The Dred Scott Case - Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Race and Law (Hardcover)
David Thomas Konig, Paul Finkelman, Christopher Alan Bracey; Series edited by Paul Finkelman, L. Diane Barnes
R1,180 Discovery Miles 11 800 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In 1846 two slaves, Dred and Harriet Scott, filed petitions for their freedom in the Old Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri. As the first true civil rights case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, Dred Scott v. Sandford raised issues that have not been fully resolved despite three amendments to the Constitution and more than a century and a half of litigation. The Dred Scott Case: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Race and Law presents original research and the reflections of the nation's leading scholars who gathered in St. Louis to mark the 150th anniversary of what was arguably the most infamous decision of the U.S. Supreme Court. The decision, which held that African Americans "had no rights" under the Constitution and that Congress had no authority to alter that, galvanized Americans and thrust the issue of race and law to the center of American politics. This collection of essays revisits the history of the case and its aftermath in American life and law. In a final section, the present-day justices of the Missouri Supreme Court offer their reflections on the process of judging and provide perspective on the misdeeds of their nineteenth-century predecessors who denied the Scotts their freedom. Contributors: Austin Allen, Adam Arenson, John Baugh, Hon. Duane Benton, Christopher Alan Bracey, Alfred L. Brophy, Paul Finkelman, Louis Gerteis, Mark Graber, Daniel W. Hamilton, Cecil J. Hunt II, David Thomas Konig, Leland Ware, Hon. Michael A. Wolff

The Encyclopedia of American Political History (Hardcover, Revised edition): Paul Finkelman, Peter Wallenstein The Encyclopedia of American Political History (Hardcover, Revised edition)
Paul Finkelman, Peter Wallenstein
R3,379 Discovery Miles 33 790 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Particularly helpful to anyone hoping to understand the evolution and intricacies of the modern American political process, The Encyclopedia of American Political History identifies the most significant personalities, trends, campaigns and elections, protests and rebellions, laws, statutes, and policies in American political history.

Alphabetically organized for easy access to include:
-- A complete chronology and an at-a-glance timeline of American political history, which helps establish a context for key figures, events, and concepts
-- More than 240 signed, original articles by prominent scholars o American political history, organized alphabetically and cross-referenced by subject for easy access
-- A glossary of frequently used abbreviations and their meanings as well as historical summaries of presidential election results for quick lookup
-- Thorough historical coverage beginning with the late 1700s.
-- Over 150 photographs, illustrations, maps, and tables to provide a rich visual presentation
-- Detailed index for easy searching and reference plus bibliographic references with most articles.

High school and beginning college students (most of them born in the mid-1980s) will find it invaluable in their struggle to understand the history of modern political events.

A March of Liberty - A Constitutional History of the United States, Volume 2, from 1898 to the Present (Paperback, 3rd Revised... A March of Liberty - A Constitutional History of the United States, Volume 2, from 1898 to the Present (Paperback, 3rd Revised ed.)
Melvin Urofsky, Paul Finkelman
R1,754 Discovery Miles 17 540 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

A March of Liberty: A Constitutional History of the United States is a clearly written, comprehensive overview of American constitutional development. Covering the country's history from the founding of the English colonies up through the latest decisions of the Supreme Court, this two-volume work presents the most complete discussion of American constitutional history currently available. Authors Melvin I. Urofsky and Paul Finkelman successfully blend cases and court doctrines into the larger fabric of American political, economic, and social history. They discuss in detail the great cases handed down by the Supreme Court, showing how these cases played out in society and how constitutional growth parallels changes in American culture. In addition, they examine lesser-known decisions that played important roles in affecting change, and also provide in-depth analyses of the intellects and personalities of the Supreme Court justices who made these influential decisions.
Updated with the most recent scholarship, the third edition of A March of Liberty offers more cases on a broader range of issues including the environment, labor, civil rights, and Native American concerns. It now presents new selections on decisions, statutes, and constitutional developments from the first decade of the 21st century--like the USA PATRIOT Act, presidential signing statements, same-sex marriage, reproductive rights, campaign financing, and firearms regulation. The text reflects the current trends in American constitutional history by employing a holistic approach that integrates the decisions of the state and lower federal courts with the decisions of the Supreme Court.
A March of Liberty, Third Edition, features useful supplemental materials including the text of the Constitution, a chronological list of Supreme Court justices, an appendix of the names and years for each Supreme Court justice, and suggested further readings. Gracefully written and clearly explained, this popular two-volume set is indispensable for courses in American constitutional history and law.

Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon
R843 R706 Discovery Miles 7 060 Save R137 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

"When Lincoln took office, in March 1861, the national government had no power to touch slavery in the states where it existed. Lincoln understood this, and said as much in his first inaugural address, noting: `I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists.'" How, then, asks Paul Finkelman in the introduction to Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation, did Lincoln-who personally hated slavery-lead the nation through the Civil War to January 1865, when Congress passed the constitutional amendment that ended slavery outright? The essays in this book examine the route Lincoln took to achieve emancipation and how it is remembered both in the United States and abroad. The ten contributors-all on the cutting edge of contemporary scholarship on Lincoln and the Civil War-push our understanding of this watershed moment in US history in new directions. They present wide-ranging contributions to Lincoln studies, including a parsing of the sixteenth president's career in Congress in the 1840s and a brilliant critique of the historical choices made by Steven Spielberg and writer Tony Kushner in the movie Lincoln, about the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. As a whole, these classroom-ready readings provide fresh and essential perspectives on Lincoln's deft navigation of constitutional and political circumstances to move emancipation forward. Contributors: L. Diane Barnes, Jenny Bourne, Michael Burlingame, Orville Vernon Burton, Seymour Drescher, Paul Finkelman, Amy S. Greenberg, James Oakes, Beverly Wilson Palmer, Matthew Pinsker

Justice and Legal Change on the Shores of Lake Erie - A History of the United States District Court for the Northern District... Justice and Legal Change on the Shores of Lake Erie - A History of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Roberta Sue Alexander
R939 R785 Discovery Miles 7 850 Save R154 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

"Justice and Legal Change on the Shores of Lake Erie" explores the many ways that the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio has affected the region, the nation, the development of American law, and American politics. The essays in this book, written by eminent law professors, historians, political scientists, and practicing attorneys, illustrate the range of cases and issues that have come before the court. Since the court's inception in 1855, judges have influenced economic developments and social issues, beginning with the court's most famous early case, involving the rescue of the fugitive slave John Price by residents of Northern Ohio.
Chapters focusing on labor strikes, free speech, women's rights, the environment, the death penalty, and immigration illustrate the impact this court and its judges have had in the development of society and the nation's law. Some of the cases here deal with local issues with huge national implications ---like political corruption, school desegregation, or pollution on the Cuyahoga River. But others are about major national issues that grew out of incidents, such as the prosecution of Eugene V. Debs for opposing World War I, the litigation resulting from the Kent State shootings and opposition to the Vietnam War, and the immigration status of the alleged Nazi war criminal John Demyanjuk.
This timely history confirms the significant role played by district courts in the history of the United States.
Contributors:
Roberta Sue Alexander, Martin H. Belsky,
Melvyn Dubofsky, Paul Finkelman, Alison K. Guernsey, Thomas R. Hensley,
Keith H. Hirokawa, Nancy E. Marion,
Dan Aaron Polster, Renee C. Redman,
Elizabeth Reilly, Richard B. Saphire,
Tracy A. Thomas, Melvin i. Urofsky

In Essentials, Unity - An Economic History of the Grange Movement (Paperback): Jenny Bourne In Essentials, Unity - An Economic History of the Grange Movement (Paperback)
Jenny Bourne; Preface by Paul Finkelman
R476 R409 Discovery Miles 4 090 Save R67 (14%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The Patrons of Husbandry-or the Grange-is the longest-lived US agricultural society and, since its founding shortly after the Civil War, has had immeasurable influence on social change as enacted by ordinary Americans. The Grange sought to relieve the struggles of small farmers by encouraging collaboration. Pathbreaking for its inclusion of women, the Grange is also well known for its association with Gilded Age laws aimed at curbing the monopoly power of railroads. In Essentials, Unity takes as its focus Grange founder Oliver Kelley and his home organization in Minnesota. Jenny Bourne draws upon numerous historical records to present a lively picture of a fraternal organization devoted to improving the lot of farmers but whose legacies extend far beyond agriculture. From struggles over minimum wage, birth control, and environmental regulation to the conflicts surrounding the Affordable Care Act, and from lunch-counter sit-ins to Occupy Wall Street, the Grange has shaped the very notion of collective action and how it is deployed even today. As this compact book so effectively illustrates, the history of the Patrons of Husbandry exposes the classic tension between the desires for achieving overall economic success and determining how the spoils are split.

In the Shadow of Freedom - The Politics of Slavery in the National Capital (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon In the Shadow of Freedom - The Politics of Slavery in the National Capital (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman, Donald R Kennon; Contributions by Jonathan H. Earle, Stanley Harrold, Mitch Kachun, …
R642 R544 Discovery Miles 5 440 Save R98 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Few images of early America were more striking, and jarring, than that of slaves in the capital city of the world's most important free republic. Black slaves served and sustained the legislators, bureaucrats, jurists, cabinet officials, military leaders, and even the presidents who lived and worked there. While slaves quietly kept the nation's capital running smoothly, lawmakers debated the place of slavery in the nation, the status of slavery in the territories newly acquired from Mexico, and even the legality of the slave trade in itself. This volume, with essays by some of the most distinguished historians in the nation, explores the twin issues of how slavery made life possible in the District of Columbia and how lawmakers in the district regulated slavery in the nation. Contributors: David Brion Davis, Mary Beth Corrigan, A. Glenn Crothers, Jonathan Earle, Stanley Harrold, Mitch Kachun, Mary K. Ricks, James B. Stewart, Susan Zaeske, David Zarefsky

Encyclopedia of African American History: 5-Volume Set (Hardcover, New): Paul Finkelman Encyclopedia of African American History: 5-Volume Set (Hardcover, New)
Paul Finkelman
R11,394 Discovery Miles 113 940 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Order early and save $100 when you buy this set at the special introductory price of $495! List price of $595 (08) is effective 5/1/09.
Focusing on the making of African American society from the 1896 "separate but equal" ruling of Plessy v. Ferguson up to the contemporary period, this encyclopedia traces the transition from the Reconstruction Era to the age of Jim Crow, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, the Brown ruling that overturned Plessy, the Civil Rights Movement, and the ascendant influence of African American culture on the American cultural landscape.
Covering African American history in all areas of U.S. history and culture from 1896 to the present, the Encyclopedia contains approximately 1,200 fully cross-referenced entries that are all signed by leading scholars and experts, making this 5-volume set the most reliable and extensive treatment to be found on African American history in the twentieth century. The set also contains 500 images, roughly 640 biographies, as well as an entry on each of the fifty states-and isn't exclusive to material on African Americans but also contains entries about the people who affected the lives of African Americans in particular and Americans in general. Unrivalled in breadth and scope, this is the preeminent source of information on this topic and is destined to become a trusted reference source for years to come.

Millard Fillmore - The 13th President, 1850 - 1853 (Hardcover, New): Paul Finkelman Millard Fillmore - The 13th President, 1850 - 1853 (Hardcover, New)
Paul Finkelman
R579 R448 Discovery Miles 4 480 Save R131 (23%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

The oddly named president whose shortsightedness and stubbornness fractured the nation and sowed the seeds of civil war

In the summer of 1850, America was at a terrible crossroads. Congress was in an uproar over slavery, and it was not clear if a compromise could be found. In the midst of the debate, President Zachary Taylor suddenly took ill and died. The presidency, and the crisis, now fell to the little-known vice president from upstate New York.

In this eye-opening biography, the legal scholar and historian Paul Finkelman reveals how Millard Fillmore's response to the crisis he inherited set the country on a dangerous path that led to the Civil War. He shows how Fillmore stubbornly catered to the South, alienating his fellow Northerners and creating a fatal rift in the Whig Party, which would soon disappear from American politics--as would Fillmore himself, after failing to regain the White House under the banner of the anti-immigrant and anti-Catholic "Know Nothing" Party.

Though Fillmore did have an eye toward the future, dispatching Commodore Matthew Perry on the famous voyage that opened Japan to the West and on the central issues of the age--immigration, religious toleration, and most of all slavery--his myopic vision led to the destruction of his presidency, his party, and ultimately, the Union itself.

Dred Scott V. Sandford - A Brief History with Documents (Paperback, 2nd ed.): Paul Finkelman Dred Scott V. Sandford - A Brief History with Documents (Paperback, 2nd ed.)
Paul Finkelman
R577 Discovery Miles 5 770 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
An Imperfect Union - Slavery, Federalism, and Comity (Hardcover): Paul Finkelman An Imperfect Union - Slavery, Federalism, and Comity (Hardcover)
Paul Finkelman
R1,092 Discovery Miles 10 920 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

"In short, we have a first-rate study of an important constitutional symbol of disunion." --Donald Roper, American Journal of Legal History 26 (1982) 255. Finkelman describes the judicial turmoil that ensued when slaves were taken into free states and the resultant issues of comity, conflict of laws, interstate cooperation, Constitutional obligations, and the nationalization of slavery. "Other scholars have defined the antebellum constitutional crisis largely in terms of the extension of slavery to the territories and the return of fugitive slaves. Finkelman's study demonstrates that the comity problem was also an important dimension of intersectional tension. It is a worthy addition to the growing literature of slavery." -- James W. Ely, Jr., California Law Review 69 (1981) 1755. Paul Finkelman is the President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow, Government Law Center, Albany Law School. He is the author of more than 200 scholarly articles and more than 35 books including A March of Liberty: A Constitutional History of the United States, with Melvin I. Urofsky (2011), Slavery, Race and the American Legal System, 1700-1872 (editor) (1988) and Slavery in the Courtroom (1985).

Signposts - New Directions in Southern Legal History (Hardcover, New): Patricia Hagler Minter, Sally E. Hadden Signposts - New Directions in Southern Legal History (Hardcover, New)
Patricia Hagler Minter, Sally E. Hadden; Series edited by Paul Finkelman, Timothy S. Huebner; Contributions by Alfred L. Brophy, …
R1,626 Discovery Miles 16 260 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In "Signposts," Sally E. Hadden and Patricia Hagler Minter have assembled seventeen essays, by both established and rising scholars, that showcase new directions in southern legal history across a wide range of topics, time periods, and locales. The essays will inspire today's scholars to dig even more deeply into the southern legal heritage, in much the same way that David Bodenhamer and James Ely's seminal 1984 work, "Ambivalent Legacy," inspired an earlier generation to take up the study of southern legal history.
Contributors to "Signposts" explore a wide range of subjects related to southern constitutional and legal thought, including real and personal property, civil rights, higher education, gender, secession, reapportionment, prohibition, lynching, legal institutions such as the grand jury, and conflicts between bench and bar. A number of the essayists are concerned with transatlantic connections to southern law and with marginalized groups such as women and native peoples. Taken together, the essays in "Signposts" show us that understanding how law changes over time is essential to understanding the history of the South.
Contributors: Alfred L. Brophy, Lisa Lindquist Dorr, Laura F. Edwards, James W. Ely Jr., Tim Alan Garrison, Sally E. Hadden, Roman J. Hoyos, Thomas N. Ingersoll, Jessica K. Lowe, Patricia Hagler Minter, Cynthia Nicoletti, Susan Richbourg Parker, Christopher W. Schmidt, Jennifer M. Spear, Christopher R. Waldrep, Peter Wallenstein, Charles L. Zelden.

Encyclopedia of American Civil Liberties (Hardcover, New): Paul Finkelman Encyclopedia of American Civil Liberties (Hardcover, New)
Paul Finkelman
R12,351 Discovery Miles 123 510 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

This Encyclopedia on American history and law is the first devoted to examining the issues of civil liberties and their relevance to major current events while providing a historical context and a philosophical discussion of the evolution of civil liberties. Coverage includes the traditional civil liberties: freedom of speech, press, religion, assembly, and petition. In addition, it also covers concerns such as privacy, the rights of the accused, and national security. Alphabetically organized for ease of access, the articles range in length from 250 words for a brief biography to 5,000 words for in-depth analyses. Entries are organized around the following themes: organizations and government bodies legislation and legislative action, statutes, and acts historical overviews biographies cases themes, issues, concepts, and events. The Encyclopedia of American Civil Liberties is an essential reference for students and researchers as well as for the general reader to help better understand the world we live in today.

The Supreme Court [4 volumes] - Controversies, Cases, and Characters from John Jay to John Roberts (Hardcover, New): Paul... The Supreme Court [4 volumes] - Controversies, Cases, and Characters from John Jay to John Roberts (Hardcover, New)
Paul Finkelman
R6,680 Discovery Miles 66 800 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

An insightful, chronological-by chief justice-examination of the Supreme Court that enables students and readers to understand and appreciate the constitutional role the Court plays in American government and society. * Useful for high school students, undergraduate students, and general readers researching the Supreme Court in general, investigating specific issues, or seeking answers to personal interest questions * Provides an accessible resource for chronologically tracing the development of civil and human rights issues from the Warren Court to the present * Examines the legacy of each Chief Justice's Court by its significant cases or decisions as well as its influence on the historical era * Notes the dramatic or long-lasting effects of Court decisions and addresses the most controversial decisions of the 21st century, underscoring the significance of Supreme Court decisions on society overall * Argues that the Court has long had a political presence and influence rather than existing as simply a legal entity

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