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The Last Keepers (DVD): Aidan Quinn, Virginia Madsen, Zosia Mamet, Olympia Dukakis, Sam Underwood, Nat Wolff, Joshua Bowman,... The Last Keepers (DVD)
Aidan Quinn, Virginia Madsen, Zosia Mamet, Olympia Dukakis, Sam Underwood, … 1
R144 Discovery Miles 1 440 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Sci-fi drama starring Zosia Mamet and Olympia Dukakis. When Rhea Carver (Mamet) realises that she is different to the other children at school, she reaches out to her grandmother, Rosmarie (Dukakis). As Rhea's mother (Virginia Madsen) and grandmother tell her the truth about the women of the Carver family being descendents of ancient witches, Rhea fears that life as she knew it will never be the same.

The Horror Film (Paperback, New): Peter Hutchings The Horror Film (Paperback, New)
Peter Hutchings
R1,442 Discovery Miles 14 420 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The Horror Film is an in-depth exploration of one of the most consistently popular, but also most disreputable, of all the mainstream film genres. Since the early 1930s there has never been a time when horror films were not being produced in substantial numbers somewhere in the world and never a time when they were not being criticised, censored or banned. The Horror Film engages with the key issues raised by this most contentious of genres. It considers the reasons for horror's disreputability and seeks to explain why despite this horror has been so successful. Where precisely does the appeal of horror lie? An extended introductory chapter identifies what it is about horror that makes the genre so difficult to define. The chapter then maps out the historical development of the horror genre, paying particular attention to the international breadth and variety of horror production, with reference to films made in the United States, Britain, Italy, Spain and elsewhere. Subsequent chapters explore: The role of monsters, focusing on the vampire and the serial killer. The usefulness (and limitations) of psychological approaches to horror. The horror audience: what kind of people like horror (and what do other people think of them)? Gender, race and class in horror: how do horror films such as Bride of Frankenstein, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Blade relate to the social and political realities within which they are produced? Sound and horror: in what ways has sound contributed to the development of horror? Performance in horror: how have performers conveyed fear and terror throughout horror's history? 1970s horror: was this the golden age of horror production? Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond. The Horror Film throws new light on some well-known horror films but also introduces the reader to examples of noteworthy but more obscure horror work. A final section provides a guide to further reading and an extensive bibliography. Accessibly written, The Horror Film is a lively and informative account of the genre that will appeal to students of cinema, film teachers and researchers, and horror lovers everywhere.

Historical Dictionary of Horror Cinema (Hardcover, Second Edition): Peter Hutchings Historical Dictionary of Horror Cinema (Hardcover, Second Edition)
Peter Hutchings
R2,165 Discovery Miles 21 650 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Horror is one of the most enduring and controversial of all cinematic genres. Horror films range from subtle and poetic to graphic and gory, but what links them together is their ability to frighten, disturb, shock, provoke, delight, irritate, and amuse audiences. Horror's capacity to take the form of our evolving fears and anxieties has ensured not only its notoriety but also its long-term survival and international popularity. This second edition has been comprehensively updated to capture all that is important and exciting about the horror genre as it exists today. Its new entries feature the creative personalities who have developed innovative forms of horror, and recent major films and cycles of films that ensure horror's continuing popularity and significance. In addition, many of the other entries have been expanded to include reference to the contemporary scene, giving a clear picture of how horror cinema is constantly renewing and transforming itself. The Historical Dictionary of Horror Cinema traces the development of the genre from its beginnings to the present. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries. The entries cover all major movie villains, including Frankenstein and his monsters, the vampire, the werewolf, the mummy, the zombie, the ghost and the serial killer; film directors, producers, writers, actors, cinematographers, make-up artists, special-effects technicians, and composers who have helped shape horror history; significant production companies; major films that are milestones in the development of the horror genre; and different national traditions in horror cinema - as well as popular themes, formats, conventions, and cycles.

Terence Fisher (Paperback): Peter Hutchings Terence Fisher (Paperback)
Peter Hutchings
R424 Discovery Miles 4 240 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Terence Fisher is best known as the director who made most of the classic Hammer horrors - including The Curse of Frankenstein, Dracula and The Devil Rides Out. But there is more to Terence Fisher than Hammer horror. In a busy twenty-five year career, he directed fifty films, not just horrors but also thrillers, comedies, melodramas, and science-fiction. This book offers an appreciation of all of Fisher's films and also gives a sense of his place in British film history. Fisher was a film-maker who spent most of his career working in the low-budget sector of British cinema, largely unnoticed by critics and possessing little control over the projects he was assigned. That he managed to fashion something distinctive from such limited resources is a testament to his considerable abilities as a film-maker, abilities which proved invaluable in the development of Hammer horror in the late 1950s. Looking at Fisher's career as a whole not only underlines his importance as a film-maker but also casts a new, interesting light on the areas in which he worked - Gainsborough melodrama, the 1950s B film, 1960s science-fiction and, of course, Hammer, one of the most successful independent film companies in the history of British cinema.

The Horror Film (Hardcover): Peter Hutchings The Horror Film (Hardcover)
Peter Hutchings
R3,341 Discovery Miles 33 410 Out of stock

The Horror Film is an in-depth exploration of one of the most consistently popular, but also most disreputable, of all the mainstream film genres. Since the early 1930s there has never been a time when horror films were not being produced in substantial numbers somewhere in the world and never a time when they were not being criticised, censored or banned. The Horror Film engages with the key issues raised by this most contentious of genres. It considers the reasons for horror's disreputability and seeks to explain why despite this horror has been so successful. Where precisely does the appeal of horror lie? An extended introductory chapter identifies what it is about horror that makes the genre so difficult to define. The chapter then maps out the historical development of the horror genre, paying particular attention to the international breadth and variety of horror production, with reference to films made in the United States, Britain, Italy, Spain and elsewhere. Subsequent chapters explore: The role of monsters, focusing on the vampire and the serial killer. The usefulness (and limitations) of psychological approaches to horror. The horror audience: what kind of people like horror (and what do other people think of them)? Gender, race and class in horror: how do horror films such as Bride of Frankenstein, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Blade relate to the social and political realities within which they are produced? Sound and horror: in what ways has sound contributed to the development of horror? Performance in horror: how have performers conveyed fear and terror throughout horror's history? 1970s horror: was this the golden age of horror production? Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond. The Horror Film throws new light on some well-known horror films but also introduces the reader to examples of noteworthy but more obscure horror work. A final section provides a guide to further reading and an extensive bibliography. Accessibly written, The Horror Film is a lively and informative account of the genre that will appeal to students of cinema, film teachers and researchers, and horror lovers everywhere.

The A to Z of Horror Cinema (Paperback): Peter Hutchings The A to Z of Horror Cinema (Paperback)
Peter Hutchings
R1,000 Discovery Miles 10 000 Out of stock

Horror is one of the most enduring and controversial of all cinematic genres. Horror films range from the subtle and the poetic to the graphic and the gory but what links them all is their ability to frighten, disturb, shock, provoke, delight, irritate, amuse, and bemuse audiences. Horror's capacity to serve as an outlet to capture the changing patterns of our fears and anxieties has ensured not only its notoriety but also its long-term survival and its international popularity. Above all, however, it is the audience's continual desire to experience new frights and evermore-horrifying sights that continue to make films like The Exorcist, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Halloween, Night of the Living Dead, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Psycho, Ringu, and The Shining captivate viewers. The A to Z of Horror Cinema traces the development of horror cinema from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries. Entries cover all the major movie villains, including Frankenstein and his monster, the vampire, the werewolf, the mummy, the zombie, the ghost, and the serial killer; the film directors, producers, writers, actors, cinematographers, make-up artists, special effects technicians, and composers who have helped to shape horror history; significant production companies and the major films that have come to stand as milestones in the development of the horror genre; and the different national traditions in horror cinema as well as horror's most popular themes, formats, conventions, and cycles.

Film Studies Reader (Paperback, New): Peter Hutchings, Mark Jancovich, Joanne Hollows, Alexander McDonald Film Studies Reader (Paperback, New)
Peter Hutchings, Mark Jancovich, Joanne Hollows, Alexander McDonald
R710 R645 Discovery Miles 6 450 Save R65 (9%) Out of stock

Ranging from the mass culture critics to post-colonial and queer theory, this film reader provides an accessible and comprehensive introduction to the main theoretical approaches within film studies. It provides students with an opportunity to engage with primary sources in the form of edited extracts from the key critics. It also provides a general introduction and chapter introductions which help to locate the extracts in historical context, and explains their contribution to, and interventions in, debates within the study of film. The intervention of cultural studies is important to much contemporary work in film, and the editors lay particular stress on an awareness of current transformations in approaches to film. Jancovich and Hollows have previously edited another text, "Approaches to Popular Film".

"Dracula" (Paperback, New): Peter Hutchings "Dracula" (Paperback, New)
Peter Hutchings
R395 R373 Discovery Miles 3 730 Save R22 (6%) Out of stock

Hammer Horror's "Dracula" was released in 1958 to a mixture of shock, outrage and praise. Yet this version of the Dracula tale, directed by Terence Fisher, was a milestone both for British cinema and for the horror genre. It made an international star of Christopher Lee and confirmed Hammer Films as one of the world's leading purveyors of cinematic terror. Peter Hutchings reveals how Hammer's newly eroticized version of "Dracula" differs from its previous incarnations. He explores the film's symbolism and narrative structure, as well as its potent sexuality and controversial take on gender. Aimed at students of film and fans of the horror genre, this lively guide reveals the legacy which Hammer's "Dracula" has left to cinema.

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