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When I Wear My Alligator Boots - Narco-Culture in the U.S. Mexico Borderlands (Paperback, New): Shaylih Muehlmann When I Wear My Alligator Boots - Narco-Culture in the U.S. Mexico Borderlands (Paperback, New)
Shaylih Muehlmann
R562 R418 Discovery Miles 4 180 Save R144 (26%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

"When I Wear My Alligator Boots "examines how the lives of dispossessed men and women are affected by the rise of narcotrafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border. In particular, the book explores a crucial tension at the heart of the war on drugs: despite the violence and suffering brought on by drug cartels, for the rural poor in MexicoOCOs north, narcotrafficking offers one of the few paths to upward mobility and is a powerful source of cultural meanings and local prestige.
In the borderlands, traces of the drug trade are everywhere: from gang violence in cities to drug addiction in rural villages, from the vibrant folklore popularized in the narco-corridos of Nortea music to the icon of Jess Malverde, the patron saint of narcos, tucked beneath the shirts of local people. In" When I Wear My Alligator Boots, "the author explores the everyday reality of the drug trade by living alongside its low-level workers, who live at the edges of the violence generated by the militarization of the war on drugs. Rather than telling the story of the powerful cartel leaders, the book focuses on the women who occasionally make their sandwiches, the low-level businessmen who launder their money, the addicts who consume their products, the mules who carry their money and drugs across borders, and the men and women who serve out prison sentences when their bosses' operations go awry.
"

Where the River Ends - Contested Indigeneity in the Mexican Colorado Delta (Paperback, New): Shaylih Muehlmann Where the River Ends - Contested Indigeneity in the Mexican Colorado Delta (Paperback, New)
Shaylih Muehlmann
R523 R447 Discovery Miles 4 470 Save R76 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Living in the northwest of Mexico, the Cucapa people have relied on fishing as a means of subsistence for generations, but in the last several decades, that practice has been curtailed by water scarcity and government restrictions. The Colorado River once met the Gulf of California near the village where Shaylih Muehlmann conducted ethnographic research, but now, as a result of a treaty, 90 percent of the water from the Colorado is diverted before it reaches Mexico. The remaining water is increasingly directed to the manufacturing industry in Tijuana and Mexicali. Since 1993, the Mexican government has denied the Cucapa people fishing rights on environmental grounds. While the Cucapa have continued to fish in the Gulf of California, federal inspectors and the Mexican military are pressuring them to stop. The government maintains that the Cucapa are not sufficiently "indigenous" to warrant preferred fishing rights. Like many indigenous people in Mexico, most Cucapa people no longer speak their indigenous language; they are highly integrated into nonindigenous social networks. Where the River Ends is a moving look at how the Cucapa people have experienced and responded to the diversion of the Colorado River and the Mexican state's attempts to regulate the environmental crisis that followed.

Where the River Ends - Contested Indigeneity in the Mexican Colorado Delta (Hardcover, New): Shaylih Muehlmann Where the River Ends - Contested Indigeneity in the Mexican Colorado Delta (Hardcover, New)
Shaylih Muehlmann
R1,951 R1,591 Discovery Miles 15 910 Save R360 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Living in the northwest of Mexico, the Cucapa people have relied on fishing as a means of subsistence for generations, but in the last several decades, that practice has been curtailed by water scarcity and government restrictions. The Colorado River once met the Gulf of California near the village where Shaylih Muehlmann conducted ethnographic research, but now, as a result of a treaty, 90 percent of the water from the Colorado is diverted before it reaches Mexico. The remaining water is increasingly directed to the manufacturing industry in Tijuana and Mexicali. Since 1993, the Mexican government has denied the Cucapa people fishing rights on environmental grounds. While the Cucapa have continued to fish in the Gulf of California, federal inspectors and the Mexican military are pressuring them to stop. The government maintains that the Cucapa are not sufficiently "indigenous" to warrant preferred fishing rights. Like many indigenous people in Mexico, most Cucapa people no longer speak their indigenous language; they are highly integrated into nonindigenous social networks. Where the River Ends is a moving look at how the Cucapa people have experienced and responded to the diversion of the Colorado River and the Mexican state's attempts to regulate the environmental crisis that followed.

When I Wear My Alligator Boots - Narco-Culture in the U.S. Mexico Borderlands (Hardcover): Shaylih Muehlmann When I Wear My Alligator Boots - Narco-Culture in the U.S. Mexico Borderlands (Hardcover)
Shaylih Muehlmann
R1,469 R1,278 Discovery Miles 12 780 Save R191 (13%) Special order

When I Wear My Alligator Boots examines how the lives of dispossessed men and women are affected by the rise of narcotrafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border. In particular, the book explores a crucial tension at the heart of the "war on drugs": despite the violence and suffering brought on by drug cartels, for the rural poor in Mexico's north, narcotrafficking offers one of the few paths to upward mobility and is a powerful source of cultural meanings and local prestige. In the borderlands, traces of the drug trade are everywhere: from gang violence in cities to drug addiction in rural villages, from the vibrant folklore popularized in the narco-corridos of Nortena music to the icon of Jesus Malverde, the "patron saint" of narcos, tucked beneath the shirts of local people. In When I Wear My Alligator Boots, the author explores the everyday reality of the drug trade by living alongside its low-level workers, who live at the edges of the violence generated by the militarization of the war on drugs. Rather than telling the story of the powerful cartel leaders, the book focuses on the women who occasionally make their sandwiches, the low-level businessmen who launder their money, the addicts who consume their products, the mules who carry their money and drugs across borders, and the men and women who serve out prison sentences when their bosses' operations go awry.

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