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The House of Fame. the Legend of Good Women. the Treatise on the Astrolabe. an Account of the Sources of the Canterbury Tales (Paperback) Loot Price: R492
Discovery Miles 4 920
The House of Fame. the Legend of Good Women. the Treatise on the Astrolabe. an Account of the Sources of the Canterbury Tales...
The House of Fame. the Legend of Good Women. the Treatise on the Astrolabe. an Account of the Sources of the Canterbury Tales...

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The House of Fame. the Legend of Good Women. the Treatise on the Astrolabe. an Account of the Sources of the Canterbury Tales (Paperback)

Geoffrey Chaucer

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Loot Price R492 Discovery Miles 4 920

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...Awak ' 573. ltwould appear that, in Chaucer, seyntis sometimes dissyllabic; but it may be better here to use the feminine form seynt-e, as in l. 1066. Observe the rime of Mdrz'e with cdrie. 576. 'For so certainly may God help me, as thou shalt have no harm.' 586. 107/es, Jove, Jupiter; cf. 1. 597. This remarkable form occurs again in Troil. ii. 1607, where we find the expression ' 01/es lat him never thryve'; and again in Troil. iii. 3--' O 101/es doughter dere'; and in Troil. iii. I 5, where laws is in the accusative case. The form is that of an O. F. nominative; cf. C/zarler, /argues, _/u/es. Stellzjj/e, make into a constellation; ' whether will Jupiter turn me into a constellation.' This alludes, of course, to the numerous cases in which it was supposed that such heroes as Hercules and Perseus, or such heroines as Andromeda and Callisto were changed into constellations: see Kn. Tale, A 2058. Cf. ' N 0 wonder is thogh Iove hir stellifye'; Leg. Good Women, prol. 525. Skelton uses the word (Garland of Laurell, 963); and it is given in Palsgrave. 588. Perhaps imitated from Dante, Inf. ii. 32, where Dante says that he is neither /Eneas nor Paul. Chaucer here refers to various men who were borne up to heaven, viz. Enoch (Gen. v-24), Elijah (2 Kings ii. 11), Romulus, and Ganymede. Romulus was carried up to heaven by Mars; Ovid, Metam. xiv. 824; Fasti, ii. 475-512. Ganymede was carried up to heaven by Jupiter in the form of an eagle; cf. Vergil, Ain. i. 28, and see Ovid, Metam. x. 160, where Ovid adds: .'qui nunc quoque pocula miscet, Invitaque Iovi nectar Iunone ministrat.' ln the passage in Dante (Purg. ix. 19-30), already alluded to above (note to l. 534), .

General

Imprint: Rarebooksclub.com
Country of origin: United States
Release date: September 2013
First published: September 2013
Authors: Geoffrey Chaucer
Dimensions: 246 x 189 x 11mm (L x W x T)
Format: Paperback - Trade
Pages: 212
ISBN-13: 978-1-130-56193-7
Barcode: 9781130561937
Categories: Books
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LSN: 1-130-56193-3

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