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Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Social institutions > Customs & folklore > Folklore

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Myths and Myth-Makers; Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology (Paperback) Loot Price: R403
Discovery Miles 4 030
Myths and Myth-Makers; Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology (Paperback): John Fiske
Myths and Myth-Makers; Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology (Paperback): John Fiske

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Myths and Myth-Makers; Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology (Paperback)

John Fiske

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Loot Price R403 Discovery Miles 4 030

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...of the thunder-cloud and the procuring of water without especial reference to any struggle between opposing divinities. But in the myth of Hercules and Cacus, the fundamental idea is the victory of the solar god over the robber who steals the light. Now whether the robber carries off the light in the evening when Indra has gone to sleep, or boldly rears his black form against the sky during the daytime, causing darkness to spread Burnouf, Bhagavata-Purana, III. p. lxxxvi; Br al, op. cit. p. 98. over the earth, would make little difference to the framers of the myth. To a chicken a solar eclipse is the same thing as nightfall, and he goes to roost accordingly. Why, then, should the primitive thinker have made a distinction between the darkening of the sky caused by black clouds and that caused by the rotation of the earth? He had no more conception of the scientific explanation of these phenomena than the chicken has of the scientific explanation of an eclipse. For him it was enough to know that the solar radiance was stolen, in the one case as in the other, and to suspect that the same demon was to blame for both robberies. The Veda itself sustains this view. It is certain that the victory of Indra over Vritra is essentially the same as his victory over the Panis. Vritra, the storm-fiend, ia himself called one of the Panis; yet the latter are uniformly represented as night-demons. They steal Indra's golden cattle and drive them by circuitous paths to a dark hiding-place near the eastern horizon. Indra sends the dawn-nymph, Sarama, to search for them, but as she comes within sight of the dark stable, the Panis try to coax her to stay with them: "Let us make thee our sister, do not go away again; we will give thee part of the cows, 0...

General

Imprint: Rarebooksclub.com
Country of origin: United States
Release date: July 2012
First published: July 2012
Authors: John Fiske
Dimensions: 246 x 189 x 4mm (L x W x T)
Format: Paperback - Trade
Pages: 74
ISBN-13: 978-1-151-21502-4
Barcode: 9781151215024
Categories: Promotions
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Social institutions > Customs & folklore > Folklore
Books > Humanities > Religion & beliefs > Myths & mythology
Books > Religion & Spirituality > Myths & mythology
LSN: 1-151-21502-3

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