0
Your cart

Your cart is empty

Books > Language & Literature > Literature: history & criticism > Poetry & poets

Buy Now

Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America (Hardcover, New) Loot Price: R1,330
Discovery Miles 13 300
You Save: R260 (16%)
  • This item is a special order that could take a long time to obtain.

Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America (Hardcover, New): Deborah Nelson
Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America (Hardcover, New): Deborah Nelson

Share your images

Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America (Hardcover, New)

Deborah Nelson

Series: Gender and Culture Series

 (sign in to rate)
List price R1,590 Loot Price R1,330 Discovery Miles 13 300 | Repayment Terms: R124 pm x 12* You Save R260 (16%)

Bookmark and Share

Supplier out of stock. If you add this item to your wish list we will let you know when it becomes available.

"Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America" explores the relationship between confessional poetry and constitutional privacy doctrine, both of which emerged at the end of the 1950s. While the public declarations of the Supreme Court and the private declamations of the lyric poet may seem unrelated, both express the upheavals in American notions of privacy that marked the Cold War era. Nelson situates the poetry and legal decisions as part of a far wider anxiety about privacy that erupted across the social, cultural, and political spectrum during this period. She explores the panic over the "death of privacy" aroused by broad changes in postwar culture: the growth of suburbia, the advent of television, the popularity of psychoanalysis, the arrival of computer databases, and the spectacles of confession associated with McCarthyism.

Examining this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense moments of reflection in the 1960s, '70s, and '80s, Deborah Nelson produces a rhetorical analysis of a privacy concept integral to postwar America's self-definition and to bedrock contradictions in Cold War ideology. Nelson argues that the desire to stabilize privacy in a constitutional right and the movement toward confession in postwar American poetry were not simply manifestations of the anxiety about privacy. Supreme Court justices and confessional poets such as Anne Sexton, Robert Lowell, W. D. Snodgrass, and Sylvia Plath were redefining the nature of privacy itself. Close reading of the poetry alongside the Supreme Court's shifting definitions of privacy in landmark decisions reveals a broader and deeper cultural metaphor at work.

General

Imprint: Columbia University Press
Country of origin: United States
Series: Gender and Culture Series
Release date: December 2001
First published: December 2001
Authors: Deborah Nelson
Dimensions: 235 x 156 x 18mm (L x W x T)
Format: Hardcover - Trade binding
Pages: 232
Edition: New
ISBN-13: 978-0-231-11120-1
Barcode: 9780231111201
Categories: Books > Language & Literature > Literature: history & criticism > Poetry & poets
Books > Language & Literature > Literature: history & criticism > Poetry & poets > General
Promotions
LSN: 0-231-11120-7

Is the information for this product incomplete, wrong or inappropriate? Let us know about it.

Does this product have an incorrect or missing image? Send us a new image.

Is this product missing categories? Add more categories.

Review This Product

No reviews yet - be the first to create one!

Loyalty partners